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Discussion Starter #1
3 questions about them:

- Any disadvantages?

- What should I look for when buying one?

- Is $300 enough to get me a decent one?

Any tips / help is appreciated!
 
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+1 to the X2 wireless products -- anything I could have listed in the disadvantages section got erased when they released their XDS95 unit. They really have brought affordable, reliable wireless to the masses. You'll need a little more scratch than $300 to get one new but it's worth every penny.

Some people find wireless units make you feel "disconnected" from your gear. Especially if you're a straight-to-the-amp type player who doesn't normally play through a buffer (like you do if you're using a pedal between guitar and amp). You can restore a bit of that push-pull feel you get with the Radial Dragster. Handy little unit. Just run it between the wireless transmitter and your guitar. I use one between my guitar and DI when I'm recording direct into the PC and using software for amp simulation. Makes the whole thing "feel" just a little more real.
 

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Wireless is awesome. I use it all the time, even at home. Once youve been shocked, you'll do the same. You never can tell when you go to some place and play and the wiring is fragged. I use the Samson one. I used to use a Shure one, but the pack was really big, and I prefer the little bug the Samson uses..............
 

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I've been gigging with an AKG Guitarbug fotr a couple of years now.


No complaints whatsoever and you CAN get one for $300.

I really prefer the transmitter design over the traditional beltpacks.

Instrument switching is silent and super quick.


Range, reception and battery consumption are all excellent.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info... I'll check 'em out.

My step dad has some 'Gemini' one, it's a major pain in the ass. I tried using it 1 time while practicing and it was fine for like 30 minutes... then out of no where it got this mad buzzing sound and then just stopped working. I'm assuming 'cause it was old and pretty beaten up... he used to gig with it a lot.

Now since I practice sitting down most of the time I mess up the ends on the cables, then I have to pull the 'cut and re-solder' act like once every 3 months. I could get right angled cables to avoid the problem but I think I'd rather try wireless again. I like the idea of being able to walk around and not tangle the cables up lol.
 

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If you try one and are happy with the sound and general performance, there's no turning back.


Cords are a total pain in the a$$.


Even things like sound check are much easier with a wireless. It's nice that I can stand behind the board and tweak my sound from the audience's perspective.
 

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I picked up a Shure one awhile ago, I think it was about $250 at Axe. VHF, not UHF, but I went for the Shure name, diversity, and wanted to stay around that price range.

Works flawlessly. And batteries last much longer than I'd expected.
 

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The problem with wireless units are that they are inconsistent - or at least the environments that you use them in are. Once players (and singers) get accustomed to them, they will use them even if the conditions do not permit, and this is where wireless gets a bad name. I've seen really cheap ones that work well and really expensive ones perform horribly in different situations. Keep a cable handy, and you will be covered.

When you are using a cable and you want to check to make sure that the AC is not 'frigged', hold your guitar by the wood and touch the strings to the metal ball of the vocal mic. If there are no sparks or huge cracks from either the PA or the guitar amp, you are safe to touch both of them at the same time.

I saw a guy electricuted in a bar in Hamilton about 15 years back - not something I'd recomend anyone try.
 

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Actually, you can almost always tell.

I always use an outlet checker before I plug in. Always. I always use GFCI protected quad boxes. I always use a "wiggy" to check for voltages between mics and guitars and what not. Always. The checking and double checking adds a bit of time to set-up, but I figger the shocks I don't get might add decades to my life.

I always use the standard AFM contract which requires the purchaser to provide a safe working environment for the musician and the musician's equipment. Safe environment includes electricity. If the purchaser refuses to sign the contract, that's a clue to me that they really don't want to commit to the price we agreed upon, or to providing me with a safe place to work. My standard line when presenting the contract is that using the contract allows me to participate in the AFM pension plan, (this is 100% true). The pension plan is a good to great one, and it doesn't cost the purchaser anything extra. It's been a long time since a purchaser turned me down on a contract.

I take a more extreme approach (surprise surprise). We carry a distro and tie in to clean power for most gigs. It's necessary because we drag a pretty big PA around and when we set up a lighting rig it's even MORE necessary.


I also use a wireless which further protects me.

I haven't been a member of the AFM for more than twenty years. I asked them to send me a package explaining the merits of membership, which they did, but I was unable to justify the cost vs benefits.
 
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