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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting tires on the car this weekend and was planning to go with winter tires, but am also considering all weather tires (not all season tires, but all weather tires). Does anyone have any experience with them?

They offer the benefit of being able to be used all year round so no figuring out where to store tires, no need to have them swapped over each fall/spring, etc. But are they as good for winter driving as winter tires? Or are they close enough to being as good that someone driving in an urban area in southern Ontario wouldn't notice the difference?

Any comments from those who have used all weather tires would be appreciated.
 

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I have some kind of heavy tread hankooks on my f150. They are not a winter tire but do well in heavy snow storms because of the tread. You can’t compare them to all season car tires though because they have a big ass tractor tread. All season care tires are crap in any season.

I have a set of blizzack ice tires for winter and the main benefit with them is that the soft compound provides more grip, control and stopping power in cold, wet slop conditions like we get in the GTA.

That’s the main benefit. Both types are about the same in deep snow but the soft ice tire compound works better in winter crap than the harder compound in the summer / all season tire. However, the soft compound is made for cold weather so once it gets to about 10C you have to go easy on them. Leaving them on in the spring will wear them out fast.
 

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I have never heard of all weather tires and I have never seen those words on any tire website.

All Season
Winter
Summer
Been around for years. Softer than all season,. harder than winter,. sort of a mix in between for people who just want one set for the whole year. They won't last as long as all season but longer than a winter set being used in the summer time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm assuming you won't get a winter tire discount on insurance if you use all weather tires though.

They have the same winter rating as winter tires, but I would check with my insurance broker.
 

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Ok if you stay in the city. Good but not as good as a true winter tire. Possibly better than some winter tires as there's a real variety of grades. I'd run them if I didn't do so much rural driving
 

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Any tool that claims to do multiple things do none of them great. Winter tires are made from a softer compound. That and the tread pattern make them do one thing, work well in the winter. I would recommend going with different tires for summer and winter. I also like each set on their own rims. On my own car I have winter tires on the stock rim that are narrower than stock and a set of nicer rims with summer tires that are wider than stock. Both are sized very close in diameter to the stock size to keep computers in the car happy.
 

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I've tried all weather/season tires on several vehicles from a Plymouth minivan to Rav4s, half ton Dodge to a Bronco II. They were fine for three seasons but none were up to winter driving. Our current Rav4 and Matrix just got their snow tires on for this winter. In the long run, it's not any more expensive for us to keep two sets of tires on rims, the miles driven remains the same.
 

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When i was young, i used to run mud and snow tires all year long and did not know the difference. Having said that, when i bought my two wheel drive Element 6 years ago, it had mud and snow tires on. On the same day, we had a bad snowfall and i could not get up the hill to our house.I left the car at our garage down the road and he put some snows on. Four hours later, went up the hill no issues.The roads where not plowed and from then on i was a believer.
 

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I’ll be able to tell you later this year. I have a set of Nokian WRG3s being installed at the end of the month on a four wheel drive.
 

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For years, I had thought that the difference between winter and all-weather tires was simply tread design. In more recent years, I learned that the real difference is in the composition of the rubber and its ability to remain pliable at colder temperatures. Winter tires remain pliable at lower temperature, improving their grip on the road.

All of that is to say that the value of having two sets of seasonally-appropriate tires would depend on a) where you live, and b) how much driving, and what type, you do during winter months. Winter tires would be of less use/criticality if one lived in the BC lower mainland, or some of the more temperate parts of southern Ontario or Nova Scotia. The so-called "905" is a judgment call. Close enough to Lake Ontario that there isn't much snow and the temperature is warmer than Ottawa or Bracebridge, but the traffic intensity recommends assurances of better grip where feasible. If one's driving is primarily local lower-speed to the grocery store in Burlington or Pickering, I would personally feel comfortable with only all-weather. If one spends more time at higher speed on any of the various 4xx-series thoroughfares in the region, then one wants better grip on those days when, despite the absence of snow, sub-zero temperatures stiffen non-winter tires. After all, being able to steer out of the way of some doofus on the 400 showing off their "skills" is not only a function of one's own reflexes. The vehicle has to respond appropriately; right down to its tires.
 

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I have Continental DWS-06 on my car, DWS meaning Dry, Wet, Snow. Their ability is mostly a function of tread depth but they are a W rated tire. Regardless, I run dedicated winters and just replaced worn out Dunlop WinterContacts with Hankook Winter iPike RS. If I was in GTA/Southern Ontario, I think an All-Weather tire should be sufficient for all but a few exception days. The biggest issue is that normally those exception days are the ones you really need to be somewhere of course.
 

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For years, I had thought that the difference between winter and all-weather tires was simply tread design. In more recent years, I learned that the real difference is in the composition of the rubber and its ability to remain pliable at colder temperatures. Winter tires remain pliable at lower temperature, improving their grip on the road.

All of that is to say that the value of having two sets of seasonally-appropriate tires would depend on a) where you live, and b) how much driving, and what type, you do during winter months. Winter tires would be of less use/criticality if one lived in the BC lower mainland, or some of the more temperate parts of southern Ontario or Nova Scotia. The so-called "905" is a judgment call. Close enough to Lake Ontario that there isn't much snow and the temperature is warmer than Ottawa or Bracebridge, but the traffic intensity recommends assurances of better grip where feasible. If one's driving is primarily local lower-speed to the grocery store in Burlington or Pickering, I would personally feel comfortable with only all-weather. If one spends more time at higher speed on any of the various 4xx-series thoroughfares in the region, then one wants better grip on those days when, despite the absence of snow, sub-zero temperatures stiffen non-winter tires. After all, being able to steer out of the way of some doofus on the 400 showing off their "skills" is not only a function of one's own reflexes. The vehicle has to respond appropriately; right down to its tires.
Problem with having grippy winter tires is that you will always stop faster that the impatient tailgater behind you. Rear-end collisions are now the most common winter accident.
 

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Then I guess the choice is between rear-ending the person in front of you, because one's own tires have insufficient grip, and being rear-ended by the person behind you, eh?
 

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It's not an option in Québec. It is mandatory to have winter tires from November 15 to April something.

An all season/weather tire might just work for you for the first winter, but by the time you went through 3 other seasons with it, it will be too worn to go through another winter. So, you don't gain anything.
Here on the mountainous dirt road where I live, a good winter tire isn't doing the job on its 3rd winter. So I sell them for cheap and get new ones. That is, if you don't want to visit the ditch too often.

 

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Problem with having grippy winter tires is that you will always stop faster that the impatient tailgater behind you. Rear-end collisions are now the most common winter accident.
id call that a quality problem to have. you cant control what other people do.
 

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Then I guess the choice is between rear-ending the person in front of you, because one's own tires have insufficient grip, and being rear-ended by the person behind you, eh?
Not really. You have to leave extra room in front of you so you can stop more gradually. You not only have to drive your own car, sometimes you have to drive everyone else’s cars around you.
 
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