The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 85 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,026 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here's an interesting theory of why Classic Rock is still holding on while many others since have come and gone.
I haven't done any research to support or refute this but it is interesting...

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-classic-rock-still-so-popular-whereas-genres-like-disco-grunge-new-wave-have-come-and-gone/answer/Daniel-Smith-986?share=a7a4e4be&srid=RQmK

Here's the text for those who don't like following links...

Daniel Smith, former Sr. Technical Analyst at Verizon (1994-2015)
Updated Wed

I have a theory that I never see proposed by others. I wonder if I’m right or actually full of sh__. Up through the 70s (in the U.S. anyway) music theory was a regular part of the curriculum through at least junior high or middle school. ALL students learned about notes, scales, clefs, rests, harmony, chords etc. as well as exposure to classical composers like Mozart, Bach, Beethoven et al through 8th grade, whether they cared about music or not. Those that did played in the band, sang in the choir and, perhaps, learned how to play the guitar. Most children who grew up in the 50s, 60s and 70s (and, of course, earlier decades) grew up with a basic understanding of music theory. Those that were inclined to put in the practice time became virtuoso musicians and used their background in theory and exposure to the classics to create the music of the times.

Now come the 80s and more and more schools are removing art, music, technical training from their curricula. Our penchant for instant gratification has us becoming less willing to spend the practice time necessary to become skilled musicians. Piano lessons are a boring, taxing, nonproductive exercise for the first 1/3 - 1/2 of the necessary practice required until the student becomes sufficiently skilled to start enjoying their art. They say it takes 10,000 hours of practice to become a virtuoso musician on any instrument. Young people today are unwilling to put in the time, or unable to do so due to it’s expense. And they don’t have the basic music education we boomers had. One of the tragedies of our current economic woes are that people, especially families, can no longer afford to take vacations; how are they going to support their budding family musician?

So bands from the 70’s and 80’s are simply better educated, musically, and are made up of better musicians than today’s. I coasted through Navy boot camp as a member of the “World Famous Bluejackets Choir.” Our company was made up of choir singers, band members and the drill team. There were serveral men with the coveted Navy MUsicians rating, some had graduate degrees and there was at least one PhD. While other companies spent their mornings marching to and fro to their classes yelling out the lyrics to “Anchors Aweigh”, our company sang it in 6 part harmony.

One way I can think to justify my theory is in the question: Name one popular rock and roll band that came into existence after 1990 that contains a virtuoso keyboardist. Now name six from the 70s/80s.
 
  • Like
Reactions: greco and Budda

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,691 Posts
I don't think it has anything to do with people being better educated in the school curriculum in past history. Everyone, now has more access to information than ever before in history. YouTube is like having personal lessons to anything you want to know. Theory can be self learned on line for free or access to famous musicians for a low cost. So those that are interested will find the information to get educated in music.
The industry is trying to tell us what good music is and presenting us with complete shit. Classic Rock still stands up very well against the crap they're trying to churn out now. Even with the geriatric musicians of the past playing it. Mostly if you want to find good music you have to do the work and find it your self in the indie scene.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,691 Posts
Classic rock is popular because Boomers still make up the largest population cohort.
Yes but its amazing how much of the younger generation are receiving classic rock as well. I remember when I was growing up in the 60's. You didn't dare admit you liked your parents music. Nowadays much of the youth are realizing just how good the old music is compared to today.
My daughter grew up on Taylor swift and some other stuff that I couldn't listen to for more than 2 minutes. I took her to a Britt Floyd concert (Pink Floyd Tribute) and she absolutely loved it.
I have picked up some music from my daughter as well. She listened to Green Day back in the 90's and I liked that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Yes but its amazing how many of the younger generation are receiving classic rock as well. I remember when I was growing up in the 60's. You didn't dare admit you liked your parents music. Nowadays much of the youth are realizing just how good the old music is compared to today.
The '60s were very different than now, that's for sure.

The music I listened to growing up stuck with me. I like classic rock, I like grunge, I like (some) modern rock, I like jazz, I like blues. But perhaps I'm an anomaly. I'm a Gen X guy, not a Boomer. My son likes rock music mainly because I play it for him. He's too young to want to reject his parents' music yet, but he probably will when he gets to be a teenager. My daughter listens to all kinds of pop crap, but she still likes some classic stuff, too.

We could never play enough CCR. The requests came from kids under 25.
And their parents would be? Boomers. Who played that music for them on car rides while they were growing up. It's great music, for sure. And kids under 25, but old enough to be in bars, are past the teenage "not gonna listen to dad's music" stage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
My own opinion is that, most Classic Rock was made in a time when artists were encouraged to find they're own identity and be themselves as opposed to being a "Superstar" or something other. I think it all started with the Beatles and then the Stones writing their own music. It wasn't until artists like Peter Frampton, Fleetwood Mac and Boston in particular, started making ginormous (Is that a word?) amounts of money, in a short space of time that I think, record companies (and their parents), wanted to seriously find the formula to this great windfall. I also think that there's an intangible element in the music that when artists and musicians make music they really believe and love, it somehow in someway comes across to the listener. I think the flipside is true as well, People can sense when an artist is insincere and going through the motions. I'm sure that there are many more factors than these at work, but this is what came to mind when I saw this thread. Cheers!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,829 Posts
Classic rock is huge because radio doesnt play much else, as well as reasons listed here.

You cant find the new cool thing if you arent exposed to it. You cant find awesome new rock bands if its all the same singles from the same bands on radio and tv. If you arent going down a YT wormhole of music, thats what you get - pre-programmed, overplayed music.

And dont get me started on the number of people who actually go to those local $5 shows versus the $75 nosebleed seat for X career band.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,492 Posts
Classic rock is huge because radio doesnt play much else, as well as reasons listed here.

You cant find the new cool thing if you arent exposed to it. You cant find awesome new rock bands if its all the same singles from the same bands on radio and tv. If you arent going down a YT wormhole of music, thats what you get - pre-programmed, overplayed music.

And dont get me started on the number of people who actually go to those local $5 shows versus the $75 nosebleed seat for X career band.
I know the once lengendary Halifax live music scene died out around the same time as the massive crackdowns on drinking and driving came into effect. When the glory days of the 70s and 80s died, working class folks couldn't afford a night at the bar, and then a 40+ dollar cab ride home. Not to mention the 25 cent drafts of the early 80s are now $7.50.

Bars, and thus bar bands, rely on their patrons having access to affordable transportation and drinks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
I know the once lengendary Halifax live music scene died out around the same time as the massive crackdowns on drinking and driving came into effect. When the glory days of the 70s and 80s died, working class folks couldn't afford a night at the bar, and then a 40+ dollar cab ride home. Not to mention the 25 cent drafts of the early 80s are now $7.50.

Bars, and thus bar bands, rely on their patrons having access to affordable transportation and drinks.
Recently overheard from a gigging guitar friend..."I think we're done with live gigs after being put in a set with two acts who were polar opposites to what we are. Time to just jam and live stream on Twitch if we want an audience...or not, who cares!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,467 Posts
Classic rock is still popular because for the most part, it's good.

No machine generated "beats", no looping (The Who being one exception, but they did it to enhance, not rely on it as being the whole song), no autotune. Lyrics that were actually sung in a melody with thought and feeling going into them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
I'm an "X-er". I grew up on my dad's Beatles/Stones/Who LP's, my Mum's Motown (how a girl born in Ireland could be such fan, is boggling) and my (older) sister's Duran Duran/WHAM/Corey Hart etc. I was cool with all of it, but none of it was mine, until I heard the Police! They were my band! From there, I got into just about everything. Led Zeppelin was "too late" for my dad, he had no interest, but through word of mouth, we found it. When I started having kids, I never, ever listened to Kiddie-Crap Disney or Wiggles, or anything else. "I am the driver, I will ditch this car!!!" But not really...
So my kids were exposed to everything I listened to. And now, at 18 & 20, they still listen to it. They have peer pressure, and listen to today's nonsense, but they've cut a pretty good balance. My 11yr old niece loves "Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For", and asks me to play the LP whenever she's here. She sits down on the couch in front of the speakers and listens to it from beginning to end. Seemingly mesmerized. Kinda cool to see music take hold right in front of you.

Classic Rock could go on forever because it's worth it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: jdto

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Classic rock is still popular because for the most part, it's good.

No machine generated "beats", no looping (The Who being one exception, but they did it to enhance, not rely on it as being the whole song), no autotune. Lyrics that were actually sung in a melody with thought and feeling going into them.
Good music is good music, no matter what instruments you use to make it. My brother can do amazing things with a drum machine and mixer, then play over top of it on his trumpet. You might not not like it, but that doesn’t make it bad.

There was a lot of bad music made in the “classic” era without autotune, loops and probably with lots of feeling. Lots of pop music is terrible. Most of it gets forgotten. The really good artists/songs stick around for a long time.
 
1 - 20 of 85 Posts
Top