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Young is funny that way. I think in a very real sense he has two distinct sets of fans. There are some who like both, but I know many who are either a fan of his electric stuff or his acoustic stuff but not both.

My wife and I are in the acoustic only camp when it comes to Neil.

I think your analogy of his electric playing is a good one.
Yeah my wife hates his electric side.

I love both but they would definitely be two different Spotify playlists.
 

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Lots of names come to mind, but the guys that I really like today are the guys like Dave Rawlings who don't need to be the centre of attention, but can add something tasteful to just about any mix - and if they can't they are happy to just be quiet. As a kid, I liked David Lindley a tonne - partly for the same reasons and partly because he shunned "guitar orthodoxy".
I saw David with Gillian Welch at the Phoenix in Toronto years back. Hot sweaty summer night. It was amazing.
 

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One?

Maybe Chet Atkins

Maybe Jeff Beck
I agree with thise on the favourites pile. Zappa as a complete musician, more than just a guitar player.

Best..... Lenny Breau is the Bobby Orr of guitar. If I could play like any other, I'd love to play like Joe Pass.
 

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You know who never gets mentioned in these threads (and probably should, as least once or twice)?
Tom Scholz.
They pre-date me slightly, but Boston was a tone monster of a band and the guy was a technical genius. Id love to know why hes so overlooked....were they too "pop-y"?
 

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Young is funny that way. I think in a very real sense he has two distinct sets of fans. There are some who like both, but I know many who are either a fan of his electric stuff or his acoustic stuff but not both.

My wife and I are in the acoustic only camp when it comes to Neil.

I think your analogy of his electric playing is a good one.
I like alot of his electric stuff but I'm primarily a fan of the acoustic and thats what I think of when I think of Neil Young. I'm not sure I agree that you could only be a fan of one or the other. Although its his acoustic stuff that I prefer how could you not like Southern Man or some of his other electric hits.
 

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I like alot of his electric stuff but I'm primarily a fan of the acoustic and thats what I think of when I think of Neil Young. I'm not sure I agree that you could only be a fan of one or the other. Although its his acoustic stuff that I prefer how could you not like Southern Man or some of his other electric hits.
I like some of his electric songs. His writing was never an issue. It's his electric guitar playing that I don't enjoy.

As soon as he picks up that Les Paul....

But there's enough positives to focus on with Neil. With a D45, piano, dulcimer.....he's magic.
 

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You know who never gets mentioned in these threads (and probably should, as least once or twice)?
Tom Scholz.
They pre-date me slightly, but Boston was a tone monster of a band and the guy was a technical genius. Id love to know why hes so overlooked....were they too "pop-y"?
You're absolutely right. I am a big Boston fan, mainly the first album which I think they were never able to equal. But when I think of Boston I don't think of the guitar player being a dominate force. I think of the band as a whole and maybe if their were a dominate force it would be Brad Delp. However Tom Scholz is a heck of a guitar player and does have a fantastic tone. They did get very pop oriented though.
 

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You're absolutely right. I am a big Boston fan, mainly the first album which I think they were never able to equal. But when I think of Boston I don't think of the guitar player being a dominate force. I think of the band as a whole and maybe if their were a dominate force it would be Brad Delp. However Tom Scholz is a heck of a guitar player and does have a fantastic tone. They did get very pop oriented though.
OTOH, when I was a kid, there were 3 guys that the guitar magazines were always trying to work their names into every discussion of the "greats"....Steve Lukather, Neal Schon and Steve Morse. I never really could figure out why...all were pretty meh in the pantheon of all time great musicians IMO. But the magazines loved them.
 
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For favourite, that's easy: the late, great Edward Van Halen. Great songs, great rhythm, wild lead player,and totally unique.

That said, the biggest influence on my was likely Steve Vai, specifically in "Crossroads" (note: not the Britney Spears movie). The mix of blues and pyrotechnics was absolutely intoxicating to 16-year-old me, and it changed everything about me as a nascent player.
 

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Knaggs Kenai, Knaggs Choptank, Knaggs Honga, Fender Strat
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So many amazing players to choose from, and music is such a personal thing, there really is no wrong answer.. for me at this point in my life and musical journey I'm still captivated by the playing and phrasing of Eric Johnson.. but switch him out with Joe Bonamassa or Doug Rappaport and I'm just as impressed. Again, so many amazing players. Johnny Hiland ranks way up on my list of favourite players still as well.
 

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I tend not to have a single favourite anything, but I hugely admire Lindsey Buckingham and Billy Duffy, for similar reasons.

They can both play up a storm, but I never felt like the overplayed - the song came first. Both have recorded some fantastic melodic guitar lines, and knew when not to play, which is a talent in itself.
 

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OTOH, when I was a kid, there were 3 guys that the guitar magazines were always trying to work their names into every discussion of the "greats"....Steve Lukather, Neal Schon and Steve Morse. I never really could figure out why...all were pretty meh in the pantheon of all time great musicians IMO. But the magazines loved them.
Yup, you're right. None of those players appealed to me. Of course during their time I wasn't listening to that kind of music. Was heavy in to the hair metal, eddie, George Lynch, and even Yngwie although he could bore me after about 5 minutes.
 

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I like alot of his electric stuff but I'm primarily a fan of the acoustic and thats what I think of when I think of Neil Young. I'm not sure I agree that you could only be a fan of one or the other. Although its his acoustic stuff that I prefer how could you not like Southern Man or some of his other electric hits.
He didn't say you could only be a fan of one or the other. He said many people are fans of only one or the other.
 

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Tough choice as I have quite a varied taste in music but I'd have to say my favourites would fall into the blues vein. Buddy Guy would lead the pack followed closely by Johnny Winter and Roy Buchanan.
 

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A few have been mentioned, Setzer, Lindley and Van Halen.

SRV had a lot of influence on me and I can appreciate his help in the resurgence of blues.
Though I'm not a Pink Floyd fan boy, I find that Gilmour plays with taste and beautiful feel.
 

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Some of my personal favourites:

Blake Mills
Marc Ribot (Tom Waits, Ceramic Dog)
Elliott Smith
Nick Drake
Julian Lage
Ry Cooder
Charlie Hunter
Jimmy Bryant
Paco Péna
Béla Fleck (banjo)
Daniel Lanois
Greg Brown (early CAKE guitar work). Has humility and kicks ass at the same time, completely sans-weedles.
Tom Verlaine & Richard Lloyd of Television
Jim Campilongo
Neil Young, on acoustic & electric
Norman Blake. Amazing acoustic flat picker, especially late in his career for me.
Jimi
Paul Simon (think his self-titled)
Robert Smith. A true original.
Andrew Bird (violin, tons of pizzicato & strumming)
David Grisman (mandolin)
Jerry Garcia (acoustic late era folk music with Grisman)
Toumani Diabaté (kora)
Molly Tuttle. I don't actually lean towards the sweetness of the music, but I could listen to her touch and be amazed by her skill endlessly.


I mention the non-guitar/other players as they've had a pretty heavy influence on my playing.
 

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John Frusciante for me. More his solo work then RHCP stuff.

Curtains continues to be one of my favourite albums to play start to finish.
 
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Some of my personal favourites:

Blake Mills
Marc Ribot (Tom Waits, Ceramic Dog)
Elliott Smith
Nick Drake
Julian Lage
Ry Cooder
Béla Fleck (banjo)
Daniel Lanois
Greg Brown (early CAKE guitar work). Has humility and kicks ass at the same time, completely sans-weedles.
Tom Verlaine & Richard Lloyd of Television
Jim Campilongo
Neil Young, on acoustic & electric
Norman Blake. Amazing acoustic flat picker, especially late in his career for me.
Jimi
Paul Simon (think his self-titled)
Robert Smith. A true original.
Andrew Bird (violin, tons of pizzicato & strumming)
David Grisman (mandolin)
Jerry Garcia (acoustic late era folk music with Grisman)
Toumani Diabaté (kora)
Molly Tuttle. I don't actually lean towards the sweetness of the music, but I could listen to her touch and be amazed by her skill endlessly.


I mention the non-guitar/other players as they've had a pretty heavy influence on my playing.
Yes I completely left bluegrass out of my post which is odd since I'm a big bluegrass fan. My influences there are of course Tony Rice, then Bryan Sutton, David Grier, then to match your choice of Tuttle for the bluegrass youth I'll add Billy Strings as quite a dynamic and unique bluegrass picker.
 
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