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Whenever we get a cold snap here in Calgary, my guitars necks seem to warp a bit. I usually get a lot more buzz than normally. My guitars normally reside in my basement which is completely finished. It is a bit colder there, but not much. It isnt super damp or anything down there either. Is this due more to humidity or temperature?

Btw, the guitars necks have a very thin finish. Very fast.
 

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hey..guitarz....
I have to do a seasonal adjustment to my guitar necks....due to changes in the relative humidity....
I dont leave my guitars in my finished basement due to higher humidity levels...than on our main floor
but it will help to run a dehumidifier.....as long as you dont dry it out too much.....

I find temperature will affect the strings more.than the neck....and therefore the tuning....

Auger
 

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Not only does humidity affect the necks, but its also the main reason acoustics crack, and the bridges lift..
 

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Xanadu said:
Not only does humidity affect the necks, but its also the main reason acoustics crack, and the bridges lift..
That happened to my shitty acoustic I got from Sears... "Mirage" or something like that. I wasn't too angry since I rarely played it and it's cheap, but I definetly learnt my lesson, lol.
 

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Is there anything I should know before getting a dehumidifier? Such as - are there ones made specifically for guitars - or would any dehumidifier do the job
etc.

thanks
 

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rsfilms said:
Is there anything I should know before getting a dehumidifier? Such as - are there ones made specifically for guitars - or would any dehumidifier do the job
etc.

thanks
You should get a hygrometer to measure the room's relative humidity. Acoustics should be kept at approx 45%

Here is some info I found

Is humidity control important for a solid-body, electric guitar?
Yes, humidity control is an important issue for any wooden instrument – even a solid body. When a solid wood guitar dries out, the wood can shrink across the grain. The fingerboard can also shrink, causing the fret ends to poke out from the sides. The fact is, that the vast majority of costly guitar repairs are caused by a lack of humidity control. The Ameritage® Humidity Control System was designed for this very reason. It allows you to easily manage the humidity level within your case, helping you to preserve and protect your investment.

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What is the ideal humidity level for my guitar case?
50% relative humidity + or - 5%.

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What is the ideal temperature for my guitar case?
68°F + or - 5°
 

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Thanks for the info - I'm going to have to look into this a little further, as it gets pretty humid here in the summer. (When i lived in Alberta, it was the other way around and I use to have one of those little case humidifier things - not sure how much it really helped though.)

later

:food-smiley-015:
 

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I've never heard of too much humidity causing a problem with guitars, unless there are mold or mildew problems.

Especially at this time of year. I would think humidity would be at it's peak in the summer months.
 

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Temperature has little to no effect on wood movement. We think it does, as when the temperature drops, the air has less humidity and wood dries out, and in the summer months the air contains more moisture and the wood swells.

If the humidity remained consistant, temp wouldnt change anything.

AJC
 

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Peavey Wolfgang EVH Wolfgang Charvel Style 2
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I live in Airdrie the City to the north of Calgary...

I find temperature and humidty changes to have an effect on most my guitars but it seems that humidity effects the ebony fingerboards most... in that I mean that the ebony fingerboards expand and contract the most.

I usually have to adjust relief twice a year.

Khing
 

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Yep, definitely humidity. I took a 52' reissue back home to Muskoka in August one year. After a week or so, the strings were lying on the frets, neck was backbowed (is that a word?) so much so as to be almost unplayable.

My main strat has quite a large neck and I find it hardly moves all winter. Most other guitars I have to adjust twice yearly, as per King. The Steinberger necks I've had - well, you could leave them in an ice hut all winter, then come spring breakup paddle an ice floe to shore, bolt it up, and the guitar would play like a dream.
 

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Definitely get yourself a hygrometer. I use a good quality digital one from the hardware store. It has temperature and humidity so I can monitor my guitars environment. I use a dehumidifier in the basement during the summer months. In winter I should use a humidifier but I am too lazy to keep adding water to it.

I have two guitars and my 20 year old BC Rich Mockinbird is like a rock. Nothing affects it. My 2004 50th Ann. Strat however is all over the place with temperature changes. I have to tweak the rod twice a hear in spring and fall.
 
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