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I have been fooling around with a couple of compressore ( Diamond , Boss Eden Touring ) but would like to see what a limiter would offer me. Not looking for sustain, but rather , percussive notes .
 

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Interesting topic. I can't help.

Compression and EQ are poorly understood and often mistaken for part of a creative process rather than a corrective procedure. Their proper application is tricky to say the least.

I will watch the replies to this with interest, as I have never really got the hang of it myself.
 

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My experience on bass is modest, but I find most limiters make you sound like garage band-it can work for certain things but is pretty one dimensional. I do like compressors, but low ratios with a blend control, they help even things up just a bit but allow range if you need it.
 

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If compressors are killing your dynamics, yer definitely doing it wrong. I play with a pick and fairly heavy compression, can go from caressing barely heard to big string excursion pounding. I have the Diamond Bass Jr, and I admit it's not *quite* as dynamic as my Empress, where I can blend some, but it's still entirely usable. I use them mainly for limiting purposes, so the loudest doesn't spike through as hard. But my style probably not what most of you are doing.
 

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I have been fooling around with a couple of compressore ( Diamond , Boss Eden Touring ) but would like to see what a limiter would offer me. Not looking for sustain, but rather , percussive notes .
Thump = high initial attack with a short duration.

Flatwound strings with a foam mute.

Use your fret hand to control duration and choke off the note in rhythmic time.

If you’re using a compressor use a slower attack speed so that more of the initial transient pops through.

You can also use rounds, palm mute, and play with a pick of your thumb.

I think left hand technique is important to getting good thump.

I’ve tried using my right hand to mute the strings before they pluck but I can’t get it to produce the same rhythmic result as I can get when using both
 

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In the studio, Universal Audio compressor, just so the bass is tamed in a song's framework. Live, I get the sound I want before we start, and then when the band crank's it up, I throw all that out the window. If it's too much woof woof, I'll play less notes, which in my case, is not too difficult to do.
 

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I have not been happy with any bass comp/limiter I have tried (I have not tried the more expensive ones). I too am not looking for sustain so much as dynamic control - evening out the notes a bit. For that I would assume a fully featured (full control of threshold, ratio, attack, and release [often mislabelled as attack on most basic 3 knob comp pedals]) unit would likely be required. There are a few but expensive so haven't botherred yet (considering DIY).
 

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My preferred method is a tube preamp. It’s dynamically interactive in that the harder I play the more it clips and it naturally limits my output. It’s a natural sort of compression/limiting that - to me - feels musical.

The problem I have with compressors is that they feel like I’m running into a wall. I dig in harder expecting a dynamic result, and what I feel is something holding me back. I’d rather it be done at the board, that way the soundman has control of how I sit in the mix and I don’t have to feel it interact with my playing.

Some people have a technique that works great for compression and they can play the compressor like I can play a tube amp. I’m not one of those people.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I am seeking a sound similar the Prakash John during the days of the Lincolns .
 

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If compressors are killing your dynamics, yer definitely doing it wrong./QUOTE]
Thats the impression you get when you don't match the output level to unity, that's really the only way to hear what compressors are doing.
That's the impression you get when you don't match the output level to unity, which is the only way to hear what a compressor is doing.
The work of a compressor is to shape the waveform, for that it has to reduce its dynamics, limiters don't even do that, they clip the crest and that's it. The only way to make a waveform even without changing its shape is volume riding:
 

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That's the impression you get when you don't match the output level to unity, which is the only way to hear what a compressor is doing.
Or if you are squashing the shit out of your signal.
 

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Biggest problem for me is I just can't perceive the subtle nuances in music post production. It's not poor hearing, it's being raised on shitty restaurant jukeboxes and crappy home hi-fi. I learned to hear what I want to hear and disregard the rest. I will have to leave the fine tuning to the experts.

The OP is looking for a specific sound. How can he get that? Maybe has nothing to do with compression...
 

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Percussive notes: transient enhancer = compressor with medium to slow release, fast to medium attack but not to slow that it doesn't compress the body of the note, just a few MS to let the transient go through unaltered, and a fairly high amount of GR and output to unity. The release time is tricky, it has to be long enough so the compressor remains active for as long as every note is playing but it can't be too long that it is still compressing when the next note kicks in, that's why is often called recovery time. I do that with several compressors (sometimes limiters but for other reason), here's are some examples in a mix context and using multiband but the theory is the same and can be applied to the guitar, you just need a good compressor with attack, release controls, I think the blue pedal from boss will do it:
 

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Then you get the character of the circuit which is easy to confuse with compression because it's a form of limiting. Guitar compressors would be easier to understand if they had gain reduction meters.
Agreed. There are a few that have GR meters though.
 
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