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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Kijiji ads attract all types. This one is from an area code in the US. Wants me to ship to Guelph. Gives me what looks like a legitimate address and wants to send funds via PayPal. Since I knew he was a Kijidiot from the beginning, I led him on.

The last of the texts are attached. What's the scam? So I send this to a house which he may or may not live at. He gets the item and either claims I sent him a rock or the PayPal account was created using a stolen credit card. But then I have his address for the police? I'm guessing he'll claim I sent him a rock as the police won't care about that.

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My Kijiji ads attract all types. This one is from an area code in the US. Wants me to ship to Guelph. Gives me what looks like a legitimate address and wants to send funds via PayPal. Since I knew he was a Kijidiot from the beginning, I led him on.

The last of the texts are attached. What's the scam? So I send this to a house which he may or may not live at. He gets the item and either claims I sent him a rock or the PayPal account was created using a stolen credit card. But then I have his address for the police? I'm guessing he'll claim I sent him a rock as the police won't care about that.

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Paypal is notoriously skewed towards buyers, and snatches money back from sellers on very modest pretexts.

The address might be one your "buyer" can have someone watch and snatch from? Or have someone there receive and forward from before claiming non-receipt, or a rock, or that your package was left out to be picked up for return and it disappeared, or...? He might claim that's not the address he told you to ship to, something was changed / missed along the way?

I dunno, I'm proud of the fact that I'd make a VERY bad liar/thief but those are some things I can think of.

However even if I couldn't nail down a likely scam I'd drop the deal anyway because the following would trigger enough alarm about it being a scam:

Do you have an account with paypal that I can pay into plus how is the condition of the watch?

IMO that is unnatural thinking for a buyer... "how do I pay?" before "what exactly are you selling?" Has the same tone as a lot of other scams, emphasizing the payment you're going to get to excite more interest than caution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Paypal is notoriously skewed towards buyers, and snatches money back from sellers on very modest pretexts.

The address might be one your "buyer" can have someone watch and snatch from? Or have someone there receive and forward from before claiming non-receipt, or a rock, or that your package was left out to be picked up for return and it disappeared, or...? He might claim that's not the address he told you to ship to, something was changed / missed along the way?

I dunno, I'm proud of the fact that I'd make a VERY bad liar/thief but those are some things I can think of.

However even if I couldn't nail down a likely scam I'd drop the deal anyway because the following would trigger enough alarm about it being a scam:

Do you have an account with paypal that I can pay into plus how is the condition of the watch?

IMO that is unnatural thinking for a buyer... "how do I pay?" before "what exactly are you selling?" Has the same tone as a lot of other scams, emphasizing the payment you're going to get to excite more interest than caution.
Oh yeah, was a scam from the beginning, I was just seeing where this led and wasting his time. I though about the 'ol watch the house trick but if I required a signature, that wouldn't work. I suspect he was going for the "he sent me a rock" scam. That way, PayPal will refund him, he won't have to send anything back to me. He gets to keep the item and sell it.
 

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I haven't sold anything online in a long time, but I liked when I was contacted by a Nigerian prince who's business associate was traveling in my area tomorrow.

I also liked being contacted by the guy in Russia who wanted me to ship a '52 Reissue Tele to him, and he would pay COD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just got off the phone with the Guelph Police and let them know that someone with a phone number from an area code in California may be squatting at that home. Some of the texts you didn't see were about how this home belongs to a friend who is out of the country. They're going to send a car over.
 

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I just checked my e-mail and got a note regarding:

Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer: PAYPAL REFUNDS sent you money.
From: "PAYPAL REFUNDS" <[email protected]>



The amount is unexpected, and I have never gotten any money via Paypal that had an expiry date. Moreover, my Paypal account is through a VISA with a different bank. The superficial aspects look legit, but something has a phishy smell. I have a URL for the "Deposit Your Money" link, though I'm certainly not going to click on it until I have some confirmation that it IS legit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just checked my e-mail and got a note regarding:

Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer: PAYPAL REFUNDS sent you money.
From: "PAYPAL REFUNDS" <[email protected]>



The amount is unexpected, and I have never gotten any money via Paypal that had an expiry date. Moreover, my Paypal account is through a VISA with a different bank. The superficial aspects look legit, but something has a phishy smell. I have a URL for the "Deposit Your Money" link, though I'm certainly not going to click on it until I have some confirmation that it IS legit.
Mark, log into your PayPal account and see if the money is waiting for you there. If not, this is certainly a phishing attempt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just got off the phone with the Guelph Police and let them know that someone with a phone number from an area code in California may be squatting at that home. Some of the texts you didn't see were about how this home belongs to a friend who is out of the country. They're going to send a car over.
Ok, got a call from the police. The lady residing there doesn't know anything about the name provided and has never ordering anything to be shipped from Kijiji. It appears they picked her house at random. To what end? I guess if they sent a PayPal transfer they would have put in a different shipping address at that time and would have come up with some excuse as to why the old address wouldn't work anymore.
 

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This scam is usually the buyer using a stolen PayPal account. But sending to a known address but wrong person living there is a new thing I've not heard of. Was he providing the shipping company? Or were you asked to ship it someplace specific? He may have provided you with an address but if he provided the company he can tell the shipper the "proper" address which you would never know about. And that link is a phishing email to get you to login to your PayPal account while they log your keystrokes and steal your username and password to repeat the process on someone else
 

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With a shipping date and you have someone watching the house for delivery and you scoop the package off the porch they think they are getting smarter but lets face it we question even real deals these days and ask for all sorts of verification's from the buyer I once asked someone to go outside and take a picture of the house address just because I wasn't sure if it was real. But does sound more like he was phishing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This scam is usually the buyer using a stolen PayPal account. But sending to a known address but wrong person living there is a new thing I've not heard of. Was he providing the shipping company? Or were you asked to ship it someplace specific? He may have provided you with an address but if he provided the company he can tell the shipper the "proper" address which you would never know about. And that link is a phishing email to get you to login to your PayPal account while they log your keystrokes and steal your username and password to repeat the process on someone else
Nope, they weren't specifying a shipping company. They just gave me that address to ship to. It's totally weird. I suspect that they might have added that part later.
 

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I just checked my e-mail and got a note regarding:

Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer: PAYPAL REFUNDS sent you money.
From: "PAYPAL REFUNDS" <[email protected]>



The amount is unexpected, and I have never gotten any money via Paypal that had an expiry date. Moreover, my Paypal account is through a VISA with a different bank. The superficial aspects look legit, but something has a phishy smell. I have a URL for the "Deposit Your Money" link, though I'm certainly not going to click on it until I have some confirmation that it IS legit.
When I'm in my email inbox, if I hover my mouse over the sender name, it will show the actual email address it is coming from. I doubt yours is actually coming from that interac.ca address as shown?
 

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There is no such function in my e-mail server, but I *can* view the "full header", which more or less provides a full summary of the entire transaction that resulted in the e-mail. But there are an awful lot of intermediaries and servers along the way for even a normal benign note, so it's hard to spot anything conspicuous.

If I'm not mistaken, isn't there a way one can enter a numerical URL and find out where and who it is? I bet Kerry would know.
 

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Just specify in person local meeting only, ignore anyone bringing up shipping as 99.999999% scams and tough beans on that 1 legit guy out there that wants to buy your stuff. Tell him to arrange a local agent WITH CASH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There is no such function in my e-mail server, but I *can* view the "full header", which more or less provides a full summary of the entire transaction that resulted in the e-mail. But there are an awful lot of intermediaries and servers along the way for even a normal benign note, so it's hard to spot anything conspicuous.

If I'm not mistaken, isn't there a way one can enter a numerical URL and find out where and who it is? I bet Kerry would know.
Did you log into your PayPal account using the known good URL and see what's there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just specify in person local meeting only, ignore anyone bringing up shipping as 99.999999% scams and tough beans on that 1 legit guy out there that wants to buy your stuff. Tell him to arrange a local agent WITH CASH.
Normally I'd agree with you. Yesterday, I sold an item on Kijiji to a guy in Toronto. But, before I would do the deal I had him call me first to make sure we were both comfortable. Turned out all was good.
 

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I just checked my e-mail and got a note regarding:

Subject: INTERAC e-Transfer: PAYPAL REFUNDS sent you money.
From: "PAYPAL REFUNDS" <[email protected]>



The amount is unexpected, and I have never gotten any money via Paypal that had an expiry date. Moreover, my Paypal account is through a VISA with a different bank. The superficial aspects look legit, but something has a phishy smell. I have a URL for the "Deposit Your Money" link, though I'm certainly not going to click on it until I have some confirmation that it IS legit.
Paypal would not send you an Interac Money Transfer, so that's a tipoff right there.

PayPal money wouldn't expire, but an Interac E-transfer would expire, eventually, and have to be re-sent, so that is not a red flag in itself.

Are you expecting a refund from PayPal of that amount? That's tipoff number two.

If you are getting a refund from PayPal, it would be in your PayPal account, so you could go check your history in PayPal to see if there is any action with that amount (or the equivalent in USD).

In general, this rings all sorts of alarm bells for me, so I'd say you shouldn't click anything.
 

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There is no such function in my e-mail server, but I *can* view the "full header", which more or less provides a full summary of the entire transaction that resulted in the e-mail. But there are an awful lot of intermediaries and servers along the way for even a normal benign note, so it's hard to spot anything conspicuous.

If I'm not mistaken, isn't there a way one can enter a numerical URL and find out where and who it is? I bet Kerry would know.
Its actually very easy to send an email with a from address of anythign you care to type in. That's how all those 'do not reply' emails work - that email does not exist. The system (any SMTP server ) allows you to input the sender - I can go into any number of systems I support and send you an email 'from' [email protected] . APIs are available to add email alert functionality to any app you care to code for yourself that include this ability. Proves nothing.

The best thing to so is any of the following:

1) Think it through - gotta be fake becasue Interac and Paypal don't work together like that. Paypal would send you a credit via their own system and not via Interac (even when you download your Paypal balance to your bank account, that goes through as a back end wire transfer and nothing to do with Interac (debit card system with additional fees Paypal does not want to pay)

2) right click on the link button, copy the URL, paste it into notepad (or whatever; just not a browser) and look at it - it won't be going to paypal.com or ca (or interac or whathaveyou) though it may have that (or whatever) keyword in the URL - if not sure, go to your paypal and look at the URL. Official sites like this would not use numeric URLs or direct IP addresses; they always use your real full name (as registered with them) never sir, madame, valued customer or something generic (that used to be the tipoff; they've gotten better, so your real full name is no longer a good indicator of legitimacy) and all links will be to their official domain. Yes, you can also reverse lookup any IP or URL at any number of sites including WHOIS.

3) What @1SweetRide said above - log in to your paypal (and/or internet banking) and find the transaction there; only accept it there vs following an email link.
 
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