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Discussion Starter #1
When I listen to him there is never that old tired pentatonic box sounds that you here a million guitar players go to.

His tone of course is super nice, but the notes he hits are never the usual or in the usual order. Something about his approach is really above the regular blues wank.

I am not talking about his blistering speed riffs or runs, but there is something very unique to the order or approach to the pentatonic / blues scales / boxes that is much more appealing and musical. His phrasing seems to be going somewhere, and never wanking for wanking's sake.

This is a long concert video, so even just jump around and it is so tasty and non blues wanky

 

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Growing up he listened to a LOT of the old blues artists. He would emulate them as a youngster and slowly worked into his own style based on all that learning.

He always thought Jimmy was better than he was as well. I just finished a book about him called "Caught in the Crossfire" and learned a lot about the legend he is.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
His timing is superb as well. He knows how to hang notes, and how to leave dead space.
 

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64 Gretsch 6120, 65 Fender Tremolux and a 58 Supro 1624T
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He’s smarter than you.
 

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Being learning / playing couple of his songs, and I noticed that he was mixing a lot minor / major pentatonic
 

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Listen to some of those big influences on him. I don't think he was really doing much different, he just re-introduced a lot of that stuff at the right time.
 

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64 Gretsch 6120, 65 Fender Tremolux and a 58 Supro 1624T
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Some people always post rude snide remarks on the same persons threads and posts all the time. That's not joking, that's a form of bullying.
It’s persistence, consistency, funny, accurate and freedom of speech.
 

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2006 Custom Christopher Reesor Classical
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What made his playing so great was his playing. The song always comes first always something new to say and in new ways. He made great riffs his own plain and simple nothing more and nothing less. RIP Stevie!
 

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2006 Custom Christopher Reesor Classical
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I hope you find my comments considerate @player99 all I am trying to emphasise is how in trying to analyse the how and what, sometimes it is the song in time that gets lost. When asked one time by an admirer "how do you find the chords you do on the guitar and the orchestra" the great composer Heitor Villa Lobos is quoted as saying he did not know. SRV I am sure if asked would not have gone into a long discussion about the theory of how he managed to insert new cadences into his playing. His guitar was his voice and he made it sing whatever came into his head, it is as plain and simple as that. The daily exercise of creating a new song with your voice anytime one comes into your head and then picking up the guitar and making the notes of the song happen is the key.

You can learn a great deal by imitating the exact sounds of others but to reach beyond that just make your own song and variations upon melodies and do it all the time instead of endlessly practising an ephemeral moment of music that someone else created.

But most importantly create your own tunes, even if they are as simple as variations upon Mary Had a Little Lamb or En roulant ma boule, it does not matter, sing something and then do it on the guitar, add some harmony and presto things start to happen but only if you try not to over analyse the harmony of a song. Mary had a Little Lamb can be done in any harmonic form Chinese traditional harmony, Indian rag style, Arabic with quarter tones and breaks into measures of 9/8 contrasting with 11/8 if you really get off the charts and dig deeply into what is possible.

Yes play pentatonic scales in all keys major and minor with swing off and on the beat in as many patterns as you can but then learn to throw in accidentals off the beat or lead to a scale tone from below the tone. You will find that scooping down semi tones is not as rewarding as ascending to a principle note chromatically or even sliding down long intervals for effect. Avoid scooping up a minor second.

But if you come away exhausted from practising without inspiration to create a song of your own then the exercises have failed and perhaps did more harm to your sense of musicality than good. In the same light you cannot explain harmonically in terms of anything other than pure creativity most of the great music of Marice Ravel. Like this famous piece which music theorists have long argued about harmonies until the arguments have reached the absurd. The music is what it is plain and simple any attempt to explain it in a codified way is not productive at all.
 
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