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I use the Canare GS-4 at home and rehearsals, and Canare GS-6 on stage. Though, the GS-4 can be used on stage too, if a bit more careful. Neutrik jacks always, ordered couple of the silent ones to try them...
 

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Unless one has an "active" guitar, that provides a buffered output, cable capacitance is going to be most consistently relevant to the cable from guitar to whatever you feed it to first, since much of what sits on one's pedalboard will provide low-impedance outputs that defeat the tone-tucking effect of cable capacitance. That said, as helpful as low-capacitance cable can/will be to one's guitar signal, as a first cable, I would imagine the physical robustness and flexibility is equally important. The cable should fall, lie, coil, in a manner that you find comfortable and convenient.

Despte its various advantages, true-bypass switching effectively turns all cable following it to the next buffered stage/device into one long cable when you've bypassed your pedals. So, if you have a 20ft first cable, and run that to six TB pedals (not a sin, I hasten to add), joined together by 5 six-inch patch cables, when those 6 pedals are bypassed, you now have an additional 30 inches of cable (2.5ft) added to your initial 20, and the unbuffered output of the last TB pedal may feed another 20ft to the amp. In total, that would make 42.5ft of cable and associated capacitance. As an example, 42.5ft of the Canare GS-4 would be like strapping a 2000pf (.002uf) cap on the output jack of your guitar. So much for sparkle.

All of this is to illustrate that capacitance CAN become a deciding factor in some contexts, and moot in others. For a great many players, the cable going from the last thing on their board to the amp, will frequently be buffered and have a low-impedance output. So unless one has a penchant for playing stadiums where your amp is 50ft+ away from your pedalboard, capacitance will matter much less for that cable than for the cable from your guitar to your pedalboard. If you run ONLY true-bypass pedals, without any buffering anywhere, then all your cable should be low-capacitance, since it all adds up. If your guitar signal necessarily hits something on your board that has an always-on low-impedance buffered output, then the last cable doesn't need to be low capacitance. If all the patch cables on your board travel every which way (usually because of odd or simply different pedal shapes and wakwardly located in/out jacks), then probably not only low capacitance will matter but so will ability to turn corners AND have excellent shielding properties. And so on.

As for solid male-to-male adapters, I used to like them, until Colin Scott (CS Guitars) drew my attention to the fact that many cast-aluminum enclosures don't have perfectly parallel sides. I looked more carefully, and sure enough, he was right. I don't know if there are some brands or sources whose sides are less right-angled than others (and that may only be a 1-2 degree slope), but it poses a problem for solid adapters that assume flawlessly parallel sides that are perpendicular to the bottom surface. That doesn't mean that ALL use of such adapters means sudden death for the pedal, but it is good to confirm, before installation, that use of such adapters to couple two pedals together WILL allow them to lie perfectly flat without posing a stress on the jack.
 
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