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Discussion Starter #1
Just thinking of expanding my choices beyond traditional electric or acoustic guitars. How do people feel about resonators? I'm more of a fingerstyle player, is slide difficult to learn? Looks like fun,but is there a big learning curve? Any recommendations on brands, options or other considerations would be appreciated.
 

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There was a bunch of them on the floor at cosmo. Tried them all and after playing 2 or 3 notes on the national I figured right away that would be the one to get. It was over 3 grand though but sounded how I think they are supposed to sound - lottsa tone.
 

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I really liked the brass body Gretch Honeydipper I played at L&M a couple a years ago. Always wished I had bought it. Sounded fantastic, looked well made, cost about $700 new.

I'm not sure they are made any more. If they are, L&M doesn't carry them.

I'd also love to try the Eastwood Delta 6 - electric resonator.
 
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Steel body Regal, wood body Dobro, Gold Tone resonator bass guitar, Kala tenor ukulele. I've been trying to breed them but it's not working.

I would start with a wood body Dobro, they tend to be cheaper than say a National tricone, some D'Addario Flattops strings, open tuning (I like G), and a selection of slides. Hop on YouTube and ride through some instructionals.
 

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Slide comes easily for some, and not so much for others--and in between for many--so you'll only know if you give it a shot--so do that--it's fun.

And open G is great--only three strings change--so it feels more natural to me.
Although I'm certainly no expert or slide virtuoso

Resos are fun--I've just never come across one I like enough to buy that I can also afford--but maybe one day.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the suggestions! I have an eye on a Regal 30 model that I might try then buy but I need to try a lower end metal body as well. From videos I've watched, they seem to have more of that distinct sound that a reso offers, at least to my ears. I'm also intrigued by combo models like an Eastwood Folkstar or Danelectro 59 reso. The internet lesson world possibly awaits and maybe I can try to channel my open tuned reso Page.
 

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I don't play much slide in open tuning, but I do play a bit in standard tuning. With that situation, string muting is important. There are many more bad string pairings or combinations than good ones and the dissonant notes have to be muted, not easy if you don't finger or hybrid pick.
 

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I love resonator guitars! I had a cheaper wood body spider cone one for years, but always wanted that nasty steel/brass bodied 20's/30's sound. Wood body is a lot "warmer" sounding, but just doesn't compare to the metal ones. After about 5 years of searching for a single or tricone model, I finally came across a good deal on a National NRP Steel 12-fret. There is just something about these National resonators that is a step above everything else. The volume and tone is incredible. This will be a guitar I take to my grave along with my Martin!
Good luck in your search!
 

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Some of my favorite players are Mike Dowling, Catfish Keith, Kelly Joe Phelps and Charlie Parr plus all the old school blues guys from back in the day!
 

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Having owned a few in the past,it is not only the body material but the type of cone. The biscuit cone is your traditional blues sound and the spider is more woody sounding as used in bluegrass. Tri cones are another story.

When it comes to metal bodies, there is brass and then there is steel. Steel will give you the rawest sound but weigh a ton. Brass is more melodic sounding. My favourite was the wood body National.
 

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As a sound hunter, I came to "dobro", midway from acoustic to banjo (ok, also got a banjitar lol !).
I did own an authentic Gibson Hound dog for a while : nut width some 1 5/8", too thin for me. Need 1 3/4"...
Bought a "Hot Rod" tricone (Lenny Gerthoffer, collector/trader of vintage dobros in California developped a mid range $ dobro line, around 1k$). As I remember he should also have biscuits type, not sure. Quite heavy compared to Hound dog. He offers 12 and 14 frets.
N.B. Biscuit type tend to flatten the cone over time, dampening the sound so that the cone could need replacement.

*** Put his name on google : had apparently serious problems in 2015.... Sorry, the tricone sounds great !
 
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