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You know, the eighth letter of the alphabet. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, you just haven’t heard it yet. Please inform, if you have info on this. Remember that little song to memorize the alphabet in kindergarten? It now doesn’t flow so smoothly.
I’m just in a grouchy mood today.
 

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I first encountered 'Hatech' when I moved to England at age 11. I've only encountered it periodically since I moved back to Canada when I was 12.

I'm much older than 12 now.
 

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I think ive heard some ppl in Britain pronounce it with the "h" in front.
Maybe it sounds classier...like the way they pronounce "schedule" as "shed-ule" not "skedg-ule".
 

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reminds me of when one of my brit friends used the term "dustbin lorry driver"....seemed like a fancy way to say garbageman.
when ever we hung out, it was like this movie, with me as the Dennis Farina character.
 

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Friend of mine from Sri Lanka pronounces it haitch and he has kind of an English accent but not really
My last manager was Sri Lankan and pronounced "-iew" as "eef". It would throw me off from time to time, because it wasn't even an accent thing. If a Brit or New Englander says "Cah" instead of "Car", or an Aussie says "noyf" (knife), it's just accent and one can mentally hear or substitute the missing or exaggerated letter. "eef" was the sort of thing I'd have to warn new employees about. It would turn a legitimate word like "review" into a sort of nonsense word ("reveef") and you'd have to mentally go back over the sentence and think to yourself "Now what word was that supposed to be?".

As I recall, "haitch" was 'ow' Newfoundlanders would pronounce it. Rather, the letter itself was "haitch", but you lived in a 'ouse', where you kept your 'at', that you'd take off when you went to give your mum a 'ug'. But accents in that blessed province depend very much on what part you're from. City dwellers will often tell you they can't make heads or tails of how people from the outports speak.
 

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As I recall, "haitch" was 'ow' Newfoundlanders would pronounce it. Rather, the letter itself was "haitch", but you lived in an 'ouse', where you kept your 'at', that you'd take off when you went to give your mum an 'ug'.
Fixored that fer ya. ;P

And an illustrative example of why the rule for a vs an applies both to words that start with a vewel, or an H.
 
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