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We're very interested in expanding our family to include a four-legged child. That being said, neither of us have ever owned dogs before. So far we've basically determined that we want a smaller dog, up to maximum around the 50 pound mark. I think our best option is a dog that has been trained beforehand. We're very interested in the rescue route.

There's so many breeds out there, it's a little overwhelming. Chances of getting a mutt with a dominant breed are pretty high, I think. No chihuahua's.

I know that one of the rescues around here crate trains all their dogs, and I don't know what the humane society does in that regard. They (HS) have an adorable Boxer up for adoption right now, and I'm very tempted to go visit tomorrow - they're right by my work.

We live in a townhouse with a tiny yard (backed onto a communal green spot where I see people walk their dogs) with access to a dog park fairly close by.

Any breed tips and things to look up/be aware of as we learn about dogs and try to find one?

Also if this thread doesn't fill up with dog pictures, we're terrible people.

Here's Lily at the Humane Society:

 

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We have done the Humane Society adoption. Not only are you helping a animal find a home the animals in their care are in perfect health with all the shots, deworming etc.... Lily look's like a sweetheart.
 

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I found a link to adoptable pets in London...

I'm on my 3rd site and I'm melting. Some candidates have appeared! I know that some dogs are more prone to various diseases than others, but I don't know which breeds are more prone to what. My google-fu is weak, so if anyone knows or is just feeling helpful, I appreciate any and all help!

My mother is (rightly) concerned about us working during the day. My understanding is that crate training means that being a good pooch parent should be viable.

I've wanted a dog for years, and work is kind of a constant for the foreseeable future...
 

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Good on you for rescuing a dog. Boxers are great dogs but need exercise as they are full of energy. Make sure you are able to take him out and let him run loose a lot. They can become destructive if not. Other than that, great dogs and this one looks like a winner. Best of luck.
 

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I love mutts with a strong border collie in them. I'm convinced they're the smartest dogs around.

I love my Goldies more than anything, but, man, they are needy.
 

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50 lbs is a lot bigger than you think :)

We've never owned a dog, but my son's gf has a lab puppy that we babysit occasionally. She's 65 lbs now and a BIG HANDFULL at that size lol.

Super cute boxer, I hear/read exactly what cboutilier says about them.
 

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If I had a longer lunch break I would just come home (where our home is now, at least) to let said dog out. I have coworkers that have that luxury haha.

I think Lily is high on the list. I've browsed a few other rescue sites and everything is great until "needs a fenced in yard" or "needs to be around its humans fairly often". We can't provide that right now :(
 

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It's great you're looking at rescue dogs. That's a win-win, IMO.

Also good everyone here knows what that means. At a backyard barbecue, someone showed up with a little Chihuahua rescue dog. My g/f's sister looked at it and said; "Who's that little thing going to able to rescue." Once the laughter stopped, we explained things to her. We also thought about that poor little dog with a brandy cask around it's neck.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Town house, small back yard,... do not get a Siberian Husky.
I think Huskies are gorgeous and I was fortunate to grow up near to one, however right now we are definitely not getting a husky. Which is a bummer since there's one eligible for adoption around here!

Assuming I'm able to do so, I'd like to go visit Lily tomorrow. I think it may also be worthwhile to send an email to a few of the agencies I've looked at basically stating our lifestyle and housing situation and seeing what recommendations the agency has.

Looking up dogs and tour vans while the boss is away, haha.
 

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I love mutts with a strong border collie in them. I'm convinced they're the smartest dogs around.

I love my Goldies more than anything, but, man, they are needy.
We love Goldies too. Our last dog was a Golden. They are beautiful dogs but not if you are working and not home unless you have a farm and have a large area where they can safely roam.

I would try and get a dog that is easy to look after and doesn't shed. Seeing you are new married, you want a dog that is very easy to care for. No sense adding stress when it is not needed. Boxers are great dogs but they have oodles of energy that you may not have the time for.
 

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That's why I'll be asking if our current structure works for dogs that are up for adoption.

My drummer was foster dad to a dog much like his own (a little guy, but not too little) but we didn't feel the timing was right. He ended up finding a place though.
 

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Dogs with floppy, laid down ears are prone to constant ear infections. A real pain. Just something to watch for.
 

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Dogs with floppy, laid down ears are prone to constant ear infections. A real pain. Just something to watch for.
I had no idea about this, thanks!
 

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You'll never go wrong with a Lab. My black lab is 15 and he has been a fantastic companion. On his last legs...literally. Tough times but still couldn't ask for any better dog.
 
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There's the breed, there's the owner, and there's the physical circumstances. My own bias is that you need all three to be happy, and having only two may not necessarily lead to misery, but increases the risk of it happening. Boxers are nice dogs. Lily looks absolutely adorable, and adopting a rescue dog is an admirable act of mercy. I don't doubt that, as newlyweds, you probably don't have a lot of stuff in the place at the moment. But I have to wonder if a dog with boundless energy ought to be in the stars at the moment. Not just because of the risk of damage, but because of the risk of heartbreak should it turn out that it's not a workable situation and you have to put her up for adoption again. I mean, you're already calling the dog your "four-legged child", and just look at that face!

Forty years ago, when I worked in neuroscience at McMaster, there was a thrombosis research and a spinal injury research unit in the teaching hospital, whose animals I would see daily in the animal quarters with artificially-inflicted spinal-cord damage. All the animals were large dog breeds, of the sort that started out absolutely adorable, and were given up because the owners found them too hard to handle: Irish Setters, St. Bernards, and other similar larger breeds. They ended up in shelters and eventually in research labs because whoever originally adopted or bought them had misjudged the commitment and their ability to honour it. Use your best judgment and try in any way you can not to be one of them.
 

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Yes, rescue.

I like Lab crosses, we call them Lab Experiments in this house. We have two, a Lab/Corgi, and a Lab/Golden Retriever.

We had a Springer/Collie/coyote cross that looked a lot like a Border Collie to the uninitiated, she was the smartest non-human I've ever known.

We had less luck with a Dalmatian cross of some sort that we fostered. He was great on his own but didn't like our other dog at the time.

Success comes with consistent single syllable primary commands, extra commands as required but always with consistent language; regular routine in feeding, exercise, rest, training, affection, reward, work, play; control the weight as overweight dogs develop health issues; limit or eliminate fatty treats, ie only healthy treats sparingly...and do some reading if you haven't already.

Our dogs have really benefited from an enclosed (fenced) yard so that they don't have to be chained and they can run around on their own. It gives us a great place to play and retrieve.

Each dog has its own memory foam bed, especially great for the older one with minor hip issues.

Cosmo 11 years old, and Otis almost 4 years old.




 
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