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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, time for my weekly weird question. :D

I have a small 2oz brick of triple filtered beeswax from when I worked on a few vintage smoking pipes, been using to put onto screws to help 'lube' them up to go in more easily, but the 2oz brick is solid as a rock.

Watched a Crimson Guitars vid, and he was using some sorta mystery cream that even he had no idea where it came from which looked way easier to work with.

Started to google search and lots of videos on making a beeswax wood polish which I suspect is what he had, but lots of variations... some were wax/turpentine/linseed, some wax/turpentine, wax/mineral oil, wax/jojoba oil... kind of the same stuff but many variations.

Anyone ever work with this stuff? Recommendations?

Linseed sounded good but when dried out may almost glue those screws in, jojoba I suspect in time may go rancid though won't be using that much, still, would hate for any wood rot around the threads... what do you guys think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was thinking that... just used the last of my coconut oil with sweet almond oil to make some beard oil yesterday, which is what got me thinking about the wax. :D

Was going to take a chunk of the wax and melt into the mix, make it a bit more of a balm.

... maybe I'll mix it all and make a beard balm screw lube. That'll be a fun label to make.
 

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Mineral oil, available in the laxative section of your local drugstore, is a standard oil to mix with beeswax, works very well & is dirt cheap - just heat up on the stove in around a 50/50 ratio, adjusted to how juicy you want it to turn out. Mineral oil is foodsafe meaning you can use that mix to treat your wooden salad bowls etc., but also won't eventually go rancid the way some oils will. Just be careful melting it together with the wax on the stove, as it's flammable. Keep it in the pot away from the flames, and don't do a beer store run while waiting for it to heat up on the stove.

Most woodworkers use paste wax to lube screws, from Johnson & Johnson, or Minwax or someone like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oy, just looked online at the SC Johnson Paste Wax, $40 a tin. Bit much for my needs. :D

I do have abnout the same amount of mineral oil as I have wax so will give that a go. I like using what I have on hand vs buying stuff... but if doesn't work well, that minwax mentioned is about $12.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
16oz, $40.60... but hey, free shipping!!!!

May be one of those items on Amazon that for some reason is just really pricey. Walmart.ca has it for $92.59 as a 6pk only not as single tins, so only $15 each but, stuck buying 6 tins. :D

I'll give the wax+mineral oil a try first. Minwax second.
 

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So, stupid question... just melting a candle and dipping the screws in that wax is not recommended? That seemed the cheapest option to me, but maybe I'm wasting my time.
 

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Parafin wax available at any hobby store
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have found that dish liquid tends to make the screw rust ,if i never had the proper wax i would grab something practical & cheap like chapstick .
Exactly why I started this thread... couple mentions of dish soap, which now doesn't seem to be that good of an idea unless you like rusted screws.

My concern with the cream wax recipes were that some involved linseed and food related oils... I wanted to avoid having screws getting essentially glued in, or the wood swelling/rotting around the threads which over time may cause the screws to wiggle loose and have to glue dowels in and redrill holes again.
 
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