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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
They have strings, a few cracks, somewhat high action, but playable. I am far from being experienced with classical guitars, and never tried to learn the Flamenco way playability-wise. A 90 plus year old lady friend of my wife, told me if I have any interest in them, that I could have them.

I will clean them up tonight and carefully investigate them.

The Goya G-10 came with the original case and appears to be in the best shape. The Goya appears to be an early 1965. Actually no cracks seen at a quick glance.
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
The second one has the cracks, but has the patina of a player. It is a 1956 Argentina made Breyer Anos (Hermanos). Possibly I misunderstood what I thought was the letter ‘A’ in Anos; it is most likely an ‘H’, as in Hnos (Hermanos). I believe Hermanos means brothers.
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This one looks like a cool guitar. I need to humidify these guitars and deal with the cracks.

I mistakenly believed 'Maipu 267' was the model and number. I originally thought it was the address or place of manufacturing, but the 1928 one had the word 'Florida' and a number in the same spot on the label. A little more research shows that both Maipu and Florida are places in Argentina.

The brief search I did, shows this brand has some dating back to the turn of the century.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
There was a 1928, and a 1942 with the same kind of labeling. They were listed for sale by shops that specialize in old guitars. The asking price is, or was quite high. The 1928 sold. I also saw a 1961 and a 1969 in my search.

I am still assuming this is a lower line, but well designed guitar brand with some provenance. I guess the classical crowd is quite unique in their wants, needs.

Maybe I need to have this one looked at by someone with more knowledge.

The neck is a handful, and yet a comfortable handful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I just finished my preliminary cleaning of the ‘56" Breyer Anos. I looked up how various shops of reputation cleaned a classical guitar, and followed as much as I could with what I had available to work with. They cautioned against hydrating the guitar in the summer. I will look into that more.

I don’t have new strings available, so I restrung it with the old ones, tuned it up. It has a sound, but I don’t have those finger styling chops. It felt odd with a pick, and my lazy barre chords. Cowboy chords are OK, intonation seems to be pretty much there.

I will try again tomorrow.
 

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Nylon string tends to be higher action as strong tension is less therefore the stunt swings more when plucked. The gutters need attach when played. Even with a pick

I tied with a nylon string electric acoustic fire a few years. Heavy sounding hitter when played aggressively.

very cool
 

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The goya g10 is a very interesting find they can sound amazing because of the age of the spruce tone wood top. Both seem to have been played quite a bit years ago. I would suggest trying only lower tension strings, nothing over 90lbs total string tension. Here is a link to what I recommend trying out. This is as high a tension rating as you should try out. La Bella 2001 Classical HT Classical Guitar Strings, Full Set On the older Argentine guitar start out even lower with the medium La Bella strings. The Argentine built guitar looks like a pine top, not spruce which is fascinating if properly restored it might sound great or it might be a complete dog. No way to know without doing the work necessary. The reason why I think it is pine is the way the growth bands have swollen over the years. This is because the resins in pine wood are more volatile and as they evaporate over the years the hard growth layers seem to expand, but it is really the softer layers losing more material than the hard layers. The same thing happens over the years to wide grained Douglas fir that is prepared quarter saw. It can happen to spruce but not to as great an extent. I have seen older Adirondack spruce wide grain Martin D28's that have the same effect of the harder layer causing ridges, mind you the old 60's D28 sounded spectacular.

These are the essential steps to restoring old guitars to a playable state.

Once you have the strings off tap the guitar top, back and sides lightly all around with a soft tip drum stick or your knuckles in a very quiet place and listen carefully for any buzzing noises. Tape the tuning heads with masking tape if they cause slight buzz noises with the strings off. Make sure that the bridge and nut are not causing any noise. If you do hear noise that is like a snare drum after quieting any possible buzzing from the saddle, nut an tuners then most likely the instrument has loose parts inside or cracks that need to be addressed properly.

If you find that the instruments are not having wood separation issues then the next step is to carefully clean the finger board with steel wool and carefully take some of the years of finger crud off the edge of the frets with a dental pick without scratching the fingerboard. Once the wood of the fingerboard is cleaned gently with light guage steel wool wipe it gently with a damp cloth and dry it quickly. Then mask between the frets with a painting grade blue masking tape leaving the frets completely exposed. Take a high quality straight edge to see if any of the frets need to be addressed or if any of them have lifted. If a some have lifted then you will might need to a use a proper fret hammer or a very light hammer and a block of hardwood to tap in down slightly. Cleaning, re-crowning and polishing the neck and frets properly is a slow process that can really make the difference between a so so guitar and one that sounds great. There are videos on youtube that can detail crowning and polishing guitar frets. A little bit of a fret dress is really important on old guitars even if you cannot get things perfect it can still make a huge difference.

Both guitars may be worth the effort to restore to a great playing condition. Especially if the goya can be restored to what it is capable of being.
 

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Cool, enjoy!

I started with a classical guitar & it's a lot fun to play and do non-classical stuff on as well.
The soya looks decent.
I agree that I wouldn't put any high tension strings on either one.
 

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Cool, enjoy!

I started with a classical guitar & it's a lot fun to play and do non-classical stuff on as well.
The soya looks decent.
I agree that I wouldn't put any high tension strings on either one.
"Soya" guitars are made in Japan. This "Goya" was made in Sweden.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
@Eric Reesor , thanks so much for your insight, experience, and thoughts. I welcome good information. Some of those thoughts were coming to me intuitively as I was going over the Argentine guitar. Thanks for taking the time and consideration to respond.

I will definitely look into your string recommendations.

The Goya will be looked at, and gone over some time later today, if the wife finds something to keep her busy. This one should be easier to deal with, as its condition is less fragile. My late night reading on the Goya, indicates that they tend to be very good, well built guitars, that have a good chance of sounding great as the wood ages, opens up. Or not, as anything can be a dog. I am staying on the optimism side of the fence. They seem to have a following, and skilled players make them sound great. The connection to Martin, I find interesting, and want to read more about that.

I have a couple of other old, to very old Parlours, and an old Grange (Toronto), that are in need of much more work than these.

The Grange is written about somewhere in this forum. Basically it’s that beginners guitar that was stuck in your hands when I was a student at the Canadian Conservatory of Music. It needs a neck reset, but otherwise near mint. I would like to get that one to be the best player it could possibly be, then send it throughout the forum members who might appreciate having it for a month or so, then pass it on.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I picked up the Argentine and wiped off some excess oil from lubing the tuners. I spent a little more time removing old gunk, DNA from the edges of the fretboard. Then gave it a little Dunlop 65 polishing, to see what it does. I have been carefully scraping, removing what I believe is house paint splattered, here and there. I need to work on the bridged tuners, as the screws are not holding well.

Otherwise, I tuned her up to Standard. I better look up how these are tuned, or should be tuned. I measured at the 12th fret. It is between 4.5 to 5 mm on the low E, high E is at 4 mm. This is with the old dead, grungy strings. So this is within spec for a better player. At this time, I would prefer a mm less or so, but I will try to get used to it. The sound is very good. New strings should be an improvement.

I still want to address the cracks. Otherwise I am very happy with this guitar so far.
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I got around to cleaning up the Goya. It is actually in quite good condition for the age. The cracks in this one are just finish checking. The overall fit, integrity, and glue, seems intact. It has not been played for at least 25 years. The lady who gave it to me, her husband passed away shortly after retiring. I called her today, and thanked her once more, and tried to listen for any regrets on her part. She assured me, that she wants them enjoyed. She told me how her husband and brother-in-law, got together with others, and were actually quite entertaining.

I basically blew the dust out of it with my air compressor, and washed it down with a cloth, dampened with hot water, and a touch of dish soap. The fretboard was not as disgusting as the Argentine. For old strings, they look good compared to the disgusting ones on the Argentine. I oiled the tuners and neatly restrung it with the same strings for now.

Surprisingly, it played easy. The action is perhaps a touch higher. I didn’t measure yet. The sound is OK, but not very loud. I was playing it outside in the patio with the fans on though. It obviously needs new strings, they both do.

I tried the capo on the first fret, to see what it did to the action. I tend to like it without the capo. I will spend time with both scenarios.

As nice as the Goya seems to play, I am drawn to the older, more charismatic Argentine. I will likely keep the Beyer Anos, no matter what. The look of it, makes me want to pick it up, it’s voice shows audible promise. I also started trying to add a little humidity to the Argentine today. I am planning to check on it daily.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I have been digging in, searching out the maker, Breyer Hnos (Hermanos).

They may have been around for 120 plus years. They have made some interesting and even odd, specialized instruments. I saw a picture of a turn of the century 11 string guitar, basically some strings added on in a harp like manner.

I have seen some pictures of spruce tops similar to mine, and even one diagonal set into the guitar. I am not sure how this would be done, but the wood for the top was selected, cut differently from the norm to enhance the grain, and then set into the guitar in a different manner. I am not fully knowledgeable on any of the common strategies in building acoustics. I am sure there are basics, then whatever can be imagined.

I also tried looking up the name ‘Breyer’, it’s origin, targeted to Argentina. It’s not easy to find things, even though the name and product, seems to have been around for a long time. Information is a little here, a little there...
 
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