The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering what makes a guitar have a warmer sound, like is it the wood or age, etc.?
thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
I will throw strings into this mix too. If you want warm try the Martin Retro strings. I find them warmer than phosphor bronze. You can try other none phosphor bronze strings if you are looking for a warmer sound, but I don’t know brands or names.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
I have very worn strings on my Taylor which are known for being bright guitars. I'm trying to decide if using worn strings is a secret to a warm sounding Taylor. I think it is.

%h(*&

Ok so perhaps I've just been procrastinating changing strings because I want to take it in for a setup and just haven't gotten around to it.
This will be done in the New Year.

To answer the OP question, it's the sum of all parts but the most influential are construction and strings, IMHO. A Taylor dreadnaught made of rosewood back and sides with a spruce top will not sound like a Martin Dreadnaught made of rosewood back and sides with a spruce top which will not sound like a Gibson dreadnaught made of rosewood back and sides with a spruce top.

To me, this clearly shows how significant construction is to the sound.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,833 Posts
String gauge, string alloy percentages, string age, thickness of pick, pick material, materials of the guitar, size of the guitar, picking closer to the neck instead of closer to the bridge, atmosphere you're playing the guitar in (dry versus humid); there's a lot of factors.

It's kind of remarkable what difference a string type and pick type change can make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Wood, age, construction, strings, playing style and technique...and any combination of these and other things.

Why do you ask?
well i've been playing an old 70's yamaha and doing recording with it, playing small shows, etc. but the guitar is getting to a point that its time to lighten the stress for it and start using a new guitar; the only problem is that the yamaha has such a dark earthy sound, and every guitar i pick up sounds so bright and happy. (bright and happy aren't words i'd use to describe my music XD)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I have very worn strings on my Taylor which are known for being bright guitars. I'm trying to decide if using worn strings is a secret to a warm sounding Taylor. I think it is.
yeah, my yamaha hasnt had a string change in at least 5 years; idk what strings were put on it to make it last this long, but the sound always blows the listener's mind. as a passerby once said while i was busking, 'theres a rawness to that guitar, and i love it'
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,833 Posts
Sorry, why does it need to be retired? Just because its old?

The fact that its broken in is probably why you prefer the tone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,614 Posts
Well, as other said, many factors... including technique, naturally.

As you describe, old strings gives a duller sound: new ones sound brighter.

Bigger acoustics (Gibson SJ-100, Taylor GS-5/516) give more bass and resonnance than a smaller orchestra (Gibson L-1, Taylor 512). Body height also goes the same way.

Rosewood back and sides warmer than mahogany or maple.

X-bracing gives rounder sound than ladder bracing.

That is why I did try so many guitars : sound quest is not that easy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Guyfrets

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Sorry, why does it need to be retired? Just because its old?

The fact that its broken in is probably why you prefer the tone.
the bridge is starting to lift from the body, and im too afraid to break it
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,950 Posts
Any guitar can be fixed. A lifting bridge is a common repair, not always cost effective, but worth investigating.

Want a darker sound? Have you considered an all mahogany (top, back, and sides) guitar? I have a Seagull that fits the bill. A cedar top guitar might also serve your needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Any guitar can be fixed. A lifting bridge is a common repair, not always cost effective, but worth investigating.

Want a darker sound? Have you considered an all mahogany (top, back, and sides) guitar? I have a Seagull that fits the bill. A cedar top guitar might also serve your needs.
ive looked at a few, currently considering the martin d15m, but working minimum wage, $1600 will take a little while XD
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,133 Posts
Well, as other said, many factors... including technique, naturally.

As you describe, old strings gives a duller sound: new ones sound brighter.

Bigger acoustics (Gibson SJ-100, Taylor GS-5/516) give more bass and resonnance than a smaller orchestra (Gibson L-1, Taylor 512). Body height also goes the same way.

Rosewood back and sides warmer than mahogany or maple.

X-bracing gives rounder sound than ladder bracing.

That is why I did try so many guitars : sound quest is not that easy.
Does anyone else notice that the G string (no jokes please) is the first string to go dull or flat. That's a warning to me that it's time to change the strings.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top