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So something I’ve always wanted to do is a little recording . I figure I have enough guitars around. A tele with a traditional tele set up , a semi ,a tele with a humbucker , a nice acoustic , and a strat that could be fixed. So I have all the bases covered . So il be looking into a small three Chanel mixer , cheaper USB interface and three microphones . No here’s the real question .

I have never bought mic’s before . From I understand there are different kinds of mic. Um I’d need three one for vocals ,miking up a acoustic guitar and another for miking up a amp . I don’t have a lot of cash to spend so I was thinking aprox $200 cad for a microphone. So my question is what are the best options my budget ?
I am getting a unit made either by my self or a local carpenter that offered to help .

It will have about three or four shelf’s on it . The bottom will has a spot for amp . Above that will have a sliding shelf for the mixer , Above that will be were the USB interface will go . And on top will be the lap top . On each side of the unite will have a guitar hanger for a acoustic and electric . I got the idea off this picture I found online
. The dimensions of the amp are in the photos .



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Basically speaking, there are dynamic mics and condenser mics. I could explain the difference, but I don't feel like typing lol.

Definitely start with a Sure SM57 (dynamic) and then look for a maybe a used condenser.
 

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Basically speaking, there are dynamic mics and condenser mics. I could explain the difference, but I don't feel like typing lol.

Definitely start with a Sure SM57 (dynamic) and then look for a maybe a used condenser.
Lol that’s the second time I was recommended that microphone . Thanks for the advice


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Check out Advanced Audio for your condenser. I bought the u47 knockoff and it sounds great.

Shure 58 for vocals, 57 as mentioned earlier.
 

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A) The mixer is definitely optional. You don't have to have one. I don't. My mics go straight into my audio interface.

B) My three mics are MXL V67G (Condenser mic), Shure 58 and 57.

C) For an audio interface I use a M-Audio Fast Track Pro. I saw one of these on Kijiji recently for like $40. Hear good things about Scarlett.

D) You will need recording software. Check out Reaper. It's free to try and $60 to buy.
 

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Basically speaking, there are dynamic mics and condenser mics. I could explain the difference, but I don't feel like typing lol.

Definitely start with a Sure SM57 (dynamic) and then look for a maybe a used condenser.
I'd say stay away from condensers, especially LDCs, unless you are willing to spend a lot more money (than e.g. a 57). Check out ribbons (they can be cheap and the fig 8 vs typical cadioid pattern can be very handy; more proximity effect and more room ambience; also can use the null points for isolation if recording 2 things at once). An Apex 205 or 210 is cheap new and actually pretty damn good (also marketed under other brands, but in Canada it's easiest to grab an Apex from L&M - the 210 is like $110 IIRC). Another good option that won't break the bank is large diaphram dynamics (EV RE20; Shure SM7b; Sennheiser MD421; Heil PR40 etc), but those are closer to 300 CAD used.

Interfaces are all pretty damn good these days. It's a matter of price and featureset.

You only need a mixer if you are running more more mics than input channels on your interface (or if you want EQ etc before the interface; not necessary in the digital age, but some people prefer to work that way, and that's valid; otherweise don't lengthen the signal chain for no good reason).

Reaper. Not much to debate there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd say stay away from condensers, especially LDCs, unless you are willing to spend a lot more money (than e.g. a 57). Check out ribbons (they can be cheap and the fig 8 vs typical cadioid pattern can be very handy; more proximity effect and more room ambience; also can use the null points for isolation if recording 2 things at once). An Apex 205 or 210 is cheap new and actually pretty damn good (also marketed under other brands, but in Canada it's easiest to grab an Apex from L&M - the 210 is like $110 IIRC). Another good option that won't break the bank is large diaphram dynamics (EV RE20; Shure SM7b; Sennheiser MD421; Heil PR40 etc), but those are closer to 300 CAD used.

Interfaces are all pretty damn good these days. It's a matter of price and featureset.

You only need a mixer if you are running more more mics than input channels on your interface (or if you want EQ etc before the interface; not necessary in the digital age, but some people prefer to work that way, and that's valid; otherweise don't lengthen the signal chain for no good reason).

Reaper. Not much to debate there.
I I thought I would need a mixer . So I just need the interphase and mikes . Cool .


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I I thought I would need a mixer . So I just need the interphase and mikes . Cool .


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IF
the interface has enough input channels with mic preamps, then yes, no mixer required. ... also if you intend on mixing 'in the box'
 

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Yeah I could never really figure out why people had mixers in their home studios who are only recording one thing at a time. I guess it would save you from having to unplug something from the interface and plug something else in to change from say mic to guitar,etc.
 

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I ditched the mixer long ago to record everything with mics (I have this thing about acoustics, acoustic tone, "air" in the recording...rational and reasonable or not). So, mic in a shock mount plugged straight into the computer (Garageband). The exception is the rare kit drum track mocked up digitally. The whole thing is idiot proof.
 

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Yeah I could never really figure out why people had mixers in their home studios who are only recording one thing at a time. I guess it would save you from having to unplug something from the interface and plug something else in to change from say mic to guitar,etc.
yes permanent patching (not a trivial thing if it's one of those where you have to go behind the comp every time), but also:

- interface has no mic preamps (rare nowadays, to my chagrin because I don't want them, but back in the day)
- want to use EQ and/or other outboard on the way in to the comp (granted, for this purpose it would be better to get a nice channel strip, but that costs a lot more)
- workflow (e.g. riding faders to deal with transient loud bits)
 

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Rode NT1A would be great for vocals or an acoustic and you could probably find a used on in the $150 range
 

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It's important to mention that you could get very acceptable results with two mics. I doubt you'll ever need to use three mics at a time, unless you're planning on recording drums.

This could open up your options for audio interfaces since only two mic inputs would be required, which lets you either lower the cost or go for a better interface. If you're keeping the same budget in mind (three mics at 200$ each) but reduce the number of mics down to two, this also opens up your options considerably.

The SM57 is a proven workhorse, is very affordable and easily available on the used market around 60-80$ (be mindful of couterfeits). However, keep in mind it is not the only option...

Ok, say you go for a used 57 at 70$. That leaves you with a whooping 530$ for your second mic! First thing you need to ask yourself: do you need to spend that much? My advice is to keep a portion of this amount for room treatment (way more bang for the buck if you're ready to go DIY) which will benefit your recordings more than you can imagine.

With the remaining money, you can look for a nice multi-purpose LDC microphone that can pull double duty for vocals and acoustic guitar. Were I in your situation, I'd send Guosheng from 3U Audio an email... Lesser known company, established designer, proper QC, sold direct so no middle-man...
 

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If you have 10.00 or 11.00 the linked video may be of some interest. The difference between a condenser mic and a dynamic mic is explained in easy to understand terms.
 
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