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Discussion Starter #1
Bought 2 live-edge slabs of wood this year, kiln dried and been stored inside where it's dry. One big slab, maybe 3 bodies worth of 2" thick Ash, and a slab of 1.75" Walnut.

Walnut would be enough for 2 bodies, not sure how it'll look, the outside edges get lighter... I'll post a pic maybe when I get home.

Initially the plan was a strat and a tele body from the walnut, but now, debating a body and a walnut neck since always wanted to try making a neck.

Here's where I'm looking for some thoughts, ideas etc...

- If I do a body/neck, I could potentially do 1 single piece, no gluing.
- I could laminate it, strip or two of maple up the middle, widen it enough that the light edges are a non-factor, but, then I lose the fact that it's a 1 piece body.
- Or, make a body and make a neck and glue together. Probably easiest and if I make a mistake on the neck, just make another neck, but loses the appeal of being a solid single piece.

Which way would you guys go? Single solid pieces top-to-bottom? stronger laminate? simple/safe?

Also... skunk stripes... are they for show only or would one make the neck strong? If a two-piece, I could skunk stripe maple, since I love the looks of those stripes I can do a reverse skunk. Though, since skunks are dark with a white stripe, I guess it would be a normal skunk stripe and fenders have reversed stripes. :)
 

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That would depend on which way the grain is running in the wood. If you somehow got a piece of wood that when looking at one end (with what would be the guitar laying flat) the grain is vertical not horizontal or a big horizontal curve, you could get away with it. If it's not vertical grain, get a couple skunk stripes in the neck part, just to keep things from going astray. In a neck-thru, they are for stability more than looks. You want to stay away from all the grain running horizontally in a neck. The skunk stripes break that up, alter the grain, make the different woods work against each other to keep the neck as straight as possible

Another thing to watch out for is weight. Any of the harder woods are heavy, specially ash
 

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How about a 2 piece walnut body with a one piece ash top? Or a one piece ash body with a book matched walnut top. Some people book match and keep the sap wood in the center. Ash and Walnut are both pretty heavy so having a separate top and body allows you to chamber as necessary.

You could also try a neck through build. Like my avatar build. Do a one piece ash neck and center piece with walnut wings. Here's a bigger pick of my neck through Firebird.
bodytrimmed03.jpg


Cheers Peter.
 

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If I had the skills..... I would do a one piece walnut body and a separate glued on or bolt on neck. I would laminate the neck, either 3 or 5 pieces of walnut, and use a scarf joint for the headstock angle (traditional classical guitar constructions).
Gibson just reissued “The Paul” which is walnut. The neck is laminated. Older top end Gibson jazz guitars always had multipiece laminated necks. I think the reason is that Walnut is not as stable as straight grained maple or mahogany so laminating it helps to keep it stable with humidity changes.
 

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1 piece bodies can warp. A 2 piece body has less chance of warpage. A laminate neck is stronger and less prone to warpage as well. Walnut body with walnut /maple striped neck would look pretty good. If you have sapwood in the body try to match it with the maple stripes in the neck. Bookmatch the walnut with the sap towards center
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Ya, I think I'd go for a 2 piece glue-in deal.... laminate the neck with maple for a skunk-stripe and strength.

Scarf joint will be my down-time project this week. When a lull in work, research how it's done. :D

Sadly, the hardest decision now, is "what" to make... shape wise and hardware. Likely, I'll get one of those mosrite style trems, just think they look cool, and a set of trisonic Brian May style pickups, do a Brian May guitar... but doesn't look like his. I like the sound, I like his playing, I'm on the fence about how the guitar looks. :D

Of course... wiring may be what changes my mind on that one... looks.... less than fun.
 

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If I had the skills..... I would do a one piece walnut body and a separate glued on or bolt on neck. I would laminate the neck, either 3 or 5 pieces of walnut, and use a scarf joint for the headstock angle (traditional classical guitar constructions).
Gibson just reissued “The Paul” which is walnut. The neck is laminated. Older top end Gibson jazz guitars always had multipiece laminated necks. I think the reason is that Walnut is not as stable as straight grained maple or mahogany so laminating it helps to keep it stable with humidity changes.

I have cut a lot of black walnut, maple, and cherry from the trees. Frankly I find black walnut the most stable of the others I have milled. If you are doing a 3 or 5 piece laminate neck I would not use a scarf joint. The reason, to me, is that it is a difficult method to construct and with a laminate neck you can easily get the depth to cut the head stock angle. The nice thing about laminated necks is that generally boards are flatsawn which when you rip and laminate can result in all the pieces being pretty much quartersawn which is very strong.
roughsawn necks.JPG


1 piece bodies can warp. A 2 piece body has less chance of warpage.
I guess 1 piece bodies can warp but I have not really seen any that have warped significantly. They are generally pretty thick pieces of wood so less prone to cupping significantly. After finishing this is even less problematic. If the blank is pretty much stable as an unfinished piece of wood once there is a finish it should not move much with changes in humidity. Again if that is a concern try going with a quartersawn piece for the body, or two piece but make sure the two piece bodies are constructed to fight against each other, or there would be much more chance of warpage.

Cheers Peter.
 
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