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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've got a late 40's, early 50's TV Front Princeton that was stripped of it's tweed before I got it and recovered in some sort of red vinyl held on with tacks. Luckily the original name plate is there, tube chart is present, transformers and speaker are original. Original handle is long gone sadly as is one of the back panels.

I took the vinyl off since it wasn't glued and the amp looks kind of ugly as is (though better than the red stuff). I'm debating whether I should have the cab re-tweeded or not. It's a cool little amp, but probably not something I'll keep long term so resale value is the question I guess. Is it better for it to be bare (still some glue and little bits of tweed fibers) and original or recovered? Complicating things is the style/pattern of tweed that was used then isn't available anywhere that I can find.

Thoughts?

This isn't the amp in question but this is similar to what the outside looks like at the moment-

 

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If it was me, and I wasn't going to keep it long term, I'd leave it as-is. As you said, it's difficult to find someone who can re-cover it correctly and a lousy re-tweed job will be a turn off.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah I've been looking at it as it is for a while, may as well just leave it. Probably put a proper handle on it though.
 

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Those old pine cabs are often quite resonant. Leave it alone & let the next owner decide.
 

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If that's what it currently looks like, I'd take to it with a palm sander and remove the "crust". Any re-covering would require a better surface for the glue to adhere to anyway, and the revealed pine cab may well be attractive enough with a simple coat or two of shellac or varnish.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If that's what it currently looks like, I'd take to it with a palm sander and remove the "crust". Any re-covering would require a better surface for the glue to adhere to anyway, and the revealed pine cab may well be attractive enough with a simple coat or two of shellac or varnish.
I like that idea Mark, thanks for the suggestion!
 
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