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Here is my performance of Villa-Lobos: Suite Populaire Brésilienne, W020 – I. Mazurka-Choro/IV. Gavotta-Choro.

I hope you enjoy!
If so, please consider sharing the video and checking out my debut album which features this piece, along with music by Darr, Matiegka, Mignone Krenek and J.S. Bach:
Shop – Liz Hogg
 

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2006 Custom Christopher Reesor Classical
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Well played indeed. Is the score you worked from the original sold to Max Eschig in the 1920s by Villa Lobos? It should have no to very sparse fingerings but very clear dynamic indications and be very easy to study and learn because of no stupid page turns out of sync with repeats the way Hal Leonard and Mel Bay mashup mixed up anthology editions are usually published. You know the 3 pages when it can be done easily in two nonsense of wasted paper.

I am using only original Fernando Sor editions of his fabulous studies and publications for this very reason, the fewer editorial messes and fingerings or worse inaccurate tablature splattered all over the page the better!

Hopefully the new editions now being distributed exclusively by Hal Leonard are a little better than the crap those jokers having been foisting upon us classical guitarist lately! Suite Populaire Brésilienne - Guitar Solo I have a few of the originals without the crap that has been added by new "owners" of the music, of the first edition original scores proof read and approved for publication by Villa Lobos, including a few of the ones he famously collaborated in the creation of with Segovia. And were first played in concert by both Segovia and his most gifted student Alerio Diaz.

Mel Bay is now the distributor for Schott in North America and those clowns are even worse than Hal Leonard at messing up classical guitar publications and making them almost unusable for guitarists that actually read music. So the original Segovia collaborations with other composers like Federico Moreno Torroba are also being hacked and whacked by the paper pusing clowns from the USA.

Quite often, especially with classical music going back to the original writing of the composer and the musicians they wrote it for is an eye opener to say the least and can actually speed up the memorization of guitar masterworks for those of us who read music. Even if Segovia was at times a bit of a tyrannical figure on the guitar his contribution by spurring on and helping the most gifted composers to write for the guitar is undeniable.

Keep up the thoughtful playing am looking forward to hearing more!!!!
 

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Nicely played.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Well played indeed. Is the score you worked from the original sold to Max Eschig in the 1920s by Villa Lobos? It should have no to very sparse fingerings but very clear dynamic indications and be very easy to study and learn because of no stupid page turns out of sync with repeats the way Hal Leonard and Mel Bay mashup mixed up anthology editions are usually published. You know the 3 pages when it can be done easily in two nonsense of wasted paper.

I am using only original Fernando Sor editions of his fabulous studies and publications for this very reason, the fewer editorial messes and fingerings or worse inaccurate tablature splattered all over the page the better!

Hopefully the new editions now being distributed exclusively by Hal Leonard are a little better than the crap those jokers having been foisting upon us classical guitarist lately! Suite Populaire Brésilienne - Guitar Solo I have a few of the originals without the crap that has been added by new "owners" of the music, of the first edition original scores proof read and approved for publication by Villa Lobos, including a few of the ones he famously collaborated in the creation of with Segovia. And were first played in concert by both Segovia and his most gifted student Alerio Diaz.

Mel Bay is now the distributor for Schott in North America and those clowns are even worse than Hal Leonard at messing up classical guitar publications and making them almost unusable for guitarists that actually read music. So the original Segovia collaborations with other composers like Federico Moreno Torroba are also being hacked and whacked by the paper pusing clowns from the USA.

Quite often, especially with classical music going back to the original writing of the composer and the musicians he wrote it for is an eye opener to say the least and can actually speed up the memorization of guitar masterworks for those of us who read music. Even if Segovia was at times a bit of a tyrannical figure on the guitar his contribution by spurring on and helping the most gifted composers to write for the guitar is undeniable.

Keep up the thoughtful playing am looking forward to hearing more!!!!
I'm using the 1990 Max Eschig edition
 

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I'm using the 1990 Max Eschig edition
I thought so. Really helps clarify the real intentions of Villa Lobos to play the editions Villa Lobos approved for publication in the late 1940's after the second world war. Thank heavens the music in France was not lost the way a great deal of some incredible Catalan composers manuscripts were during the Fascists bombings in Spain during the late 1930's

Even though some of the original manuscripts had been put to printing plates by Max Eschig since the 1920's the second world war played hell with the music publishing business especially in France and Italy. The problem were still evident when I first started studying classical guitar in the early 1970's. Eschig still sat on quite a bit of Villa Lobos and only released limited numbers of copies on request for large dollars unless it was the Preludes which sold in enough volume for them to justify larger print runs.

I should be posting recordings of a few pieces quite soon. I am deliberately playing some Bach as if he had been around during the early 19th century and was writing for both the guitar and Terz. The sound should be something like the way a true Terz guitar that both Giuliani and his gifted daughter played. Giuliani was considered the Paganini of guitar and for good reason. It is recorded that he was insulted and derided by violinists for playing Bach's "violin" pieces on the guitar but his audience loved it, the same problems Segovia frequently faced for playing Bach on the guitar... LOL What they played on the Terz or full size with capo should have somewhat akin to a viola but with much more bite and harmonic possibilities.

Perhaps a Terz is an instrument that was way ahead of its time. I hope to demonstrate the potential of one built with a modern bracing and more powerful new classical guitar strings some day. Till then my Shubb capo will just have to do.

It is also a very interesting exercise to play BWV 998 capo first to put it back into E flat, the original key it was conceived for the Luth and Clavicembalo. Helps greatly in studying the piece because the exercise slightly shortens the string length and lowers the action but on a well set up good classical can sound great with the open strings sounding on a zero fret. I know, some guitarists and worse teachers consider using a capo tabu but to me that attitude is complete crap, the exercise of learning with one in every key and transposing as you play is great especially if you take off the capo and then try to play in a difficult key like e flat with new fingerings it helps to learn inversions faster than any other method I have tried.

Interesting that some of the first guitarists to play these great Bach pieces preferred to play on a Hauser like setup with a zero fret instead of a traditional Spanish bone nut action so that the difference between an open string sound and a fretted one was negligible. I play a standard 650 and have no problems with pieces that were written for the guitar but navigating the fuge from BWV 998 has always been just a little bit of a stretch of my hand size without deliberately truncating the note duration a little too much for my tastes. But with a capo the piece absolutely comes alive on my 648 scale 1875 Torres clone, without straining my left hand, on this particular guitar my brother built.

Keep making the guitar sound great.
Eric
 
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