The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow humans , I just brought home a " Vibration Technology Ltd. 4M 140 Serial # 1252 ' amplifier. I have yet to find any useful information on this product other than it was manufactured in Scarborough, Ontario and that the company is no longer in business. Could somebody please help me find any other useful information. Many thanks and I will provide pictures shortly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hello fellow humans , I just brought home a " Vibration Technology Ltd. 4M 140 Serial # 1252 ' amplifier. I have yet to find any useful information on this product other than it was manufactured in Scarborough, Ontario and that the company is no longer in business. Could somebody please help me find any other useful information. Many thanks and I will provide pictures shortly.
Any chance you found information on your VT? I have a VT212 that I got in the 70's, I actually loved it until it started misbehaving. I had it worked on by (an incompetent) tech in Texas but it was never the same. I just found an EQ-140 in Austin Texas that has a similar issue. I'm hoping to find some information about what got changed in mine and hopefully get them both working.

Most people either love them or hate them. I actually love mine, I had DeMarzio dual sound pickups in my SG that really worked well with this setup. Of course mine still has the 25w greenbacks in it. I have heard (actually heard) pedal steel through these amps and they are absolutely off that charts amazing.

Any help with archives, schematics, parts crossovers etc would be greatly appreciated... I'm trying to resurrect these old amps because they are a great example of both early transistor amps that sounded interesting and they are early Canadian guitar amps, which seem as rare as chicken teeth.

Thanks!
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
More commonly known as VT.

Does yours have the phasor?

Just bumped older thread for you.
I have a VT212 (Phasor Twin) that I got in the 70's, I actually loved it until it started misbehaving. I had it worked on by (an incompetent) tech in Texas but it was never the same. I just found an EQ-140 in Austin Texas that has a similar issue. I'm hoping to find some information about what got changed in mine and hopefully get them both working.

Most people either love them or hate them. I actually love mine, I had DeMarzio dual sound pickups in my SG that really worked well with this setup. Of course mine still has the 25w greenbacks in it. I have heard (actually heard) pedal steel through these amps and they are absolutely off that charts amazing.

Any help with archives, schematics, parts crossovers etc would be greatly appreciated... I'm trying to resurrect these old amps because they are a great example of both early transistor amps that sounded interesting and they are early Canadian guitar amps, which seem as rare as chicken teeth.

Thanks!
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
This is the EQ 140 I just got from a guy in Austin, TX. He said the power transistors are bad but I'm thinking it was running a 2 ohm load that a burned resistor that toasted something else in the chain. The circuit board on the power side is darkened and there is a dark resistor opposite.

I'm going to start pulling the caps and the big resistors and replace them to see if that helps. Any other ideas?







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,833 Posts
Resistors get burnt by bad transistors, not the other way around.
The transistors are socketed, so they are easy to remove and test with the diode function of a multi-meter. Keep track of which goes where. Google around for transistor checking with meter, there should be plenty of tutorials.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top