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Discussion Starter #1
found this guy on you tube and he has a lot of interesting comments about specific guitarists.
plenty of videos to be found so if you like this one, check him out as he analysis your favorite guitarist.

I like this one cause he comments on the idea of trying to copy a solo from the original.
G.
 

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Thanks! Very interesting and enjoyable...

Frank Marino

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Frank Marino

Background information
Birth name
Francesco Antonio Marino
Born November 20, 1954 (age 63)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Genres Hard rock, blues rock, heavy metal
Occupation(s) Musician, songwriter
Instruments Guitar
Years active 1970 – 1993
2001 – present
Associated acts Mahogany Rush
Website mahoganyrush.com
Francesco Antonio Marino(born November 20, 1954) is an Italian Canadian[1] guitarist, leader of Canadian hard rockband Mahogany Rush. Often compared to Jimi Hendrix, he is acknowledged as one of the best and most underrated[2]guitarists of the 1970s.
  • Biography and career[edit]
After playing drums since he was five,[3] around age 13–14 Marino started playing guitar.[4] An often-repeated myth is he was visited by an apparition of Jimi Hendrix after a bad LSD trip,[5][6] a myth Marino has always disavowed, and still does so now on his personal website.[7] His playing, however, is inspired by Hendrix (on the Gibson website he is described as "carrying Jimi's psychedelic torch"[8]), and Marino is notable for strong cover versions of Hendrix classics such as "Purple Haze" and "All Along The Watchtower".[9][8] He has been criticized by some as a Hendrix clone.[10][11] Marino himself claims that he didn't consciously set out to imitate Hendrix's style at all: "The whole style just came naturally. I didn't choose it; it chose me." [12]

Mahogany Rush was moderately popular in the 1970s. Their records charted in Billboard, and they toured extensively, playing such venues as California Jam II (1978). Toward the end of the 1970s, the band began to be billed as "Frank Marino and Mahogany Rush."[13] Not much later, Mahogany Rush split up and in the early 1980s Marino released two solo albums on CBS. The band reformed and continued to perform throughout the 1980s and 1990s. In 1993, Marino retired from the music industry.

Marino returned in 2000, "I always knew we had fans, I just didn't know I'd find half a million of them on the Web," he said in an interview with Guitar Player in 2005.[3] He released Eye of the Storm, and went on tour again, playing more improvisational shows.[3] Frank is still active, recording and touring under his own name. He has also been involved in blues recordings with other artists as well, playing on tribute albums to Albert King and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Marino is uncle to Danny Marino, lead guitarist of Canadian metal band The Agonist.

Technique and equipment[edit]
Besides Jimi Hendrix, Marino acknowledged the influence of John Cipollina(of Quicksilver Messenger Service fame), Robby Krieger,[14] Duane Allman, Johnny Winter, and Carlos Santana. He plays blues, heavy metal, and improvisational styles; one of his notable tricks is playing (live) a lick as if it were played backwards, with the help of only a volume pedal and a delay.[3]His style has influenced many guitar players, including Zakk Wylde,[15] Joe Bonamassa,[16] Eric Gales and Paul Gilbert.[17] His tone is recognized by for instance Guitar Player, which called him a "full-spectrum guitar god," alongside Jeff Beck, Eddie Van Halen, and The Edge.[18]

Marino is a devoted Gibson SG player and uses them with the original PAF pickups and two with DiMarzio humbuckers.[3] He also has an SG with single-coil DiMarzio pickups.[19] He is noted for complicated setups; according to Guitar Player, he has "an entire pedalboard ... assigned to hold the expression pedals that control the parameters of the effects on anotherpedalboard."[3] In the past, he has built his own amplifiers to achieve the right sound; he also uses Fender Twins.[3] He currently uses a preamp which he built himself, reminiscent of a Fender, and any available power amp, through a 2x15" Fane cabinet.[19]

Discography[edit]
Solo[edit]
 

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I caught onto this guy a couple of months ago. He has a number of really good, insightful opinions on a number guitarists that are sometimes overlooked by many of the other channels that do this type of thing. I'm another Marino fan that feels he was so very underrated compared to many of his contemporaries. Marino seems to have flew under many musicians radar from my experience. I'm not really sure why.

Thanks for posting this @GTmaker . Much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
what I found interesting about that clip about Frank Marino was the idea that trying to copy a solo is real hard.
I always thought that too but its hard to explain to folks what that means.

Some songs have "guitar licks" ....these are signature passes that if your going to play that song, a guitarist needs to learn.
If you can tell a song just by listening to a particular guitar line, chances are that its a guitar lick.
A guitar solo is something else...Its improvisation. Although it may be similar, a guitarist will not play a solo exactly the same night after night cause that's really hard to do.
If you are going to copy a solo...unless you are a very exceptional player, that's even harder to do.

And yes...i too will be enjoying more videos.
G.
 

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I caught onto this guy a couple of months ago. He has a number of really good, insightful opinions on a number guitarists that are sometimes overlooked by many of the other channels that do this type of thing. I'm another Marino fan that feels he was so very underrated compared to many of his contemporaries. Marino seems to have flew under many musicians radar from my experience. I'm not really sure why.

Thanks for posting this @GTmaker . Much appreciated.
My neighbor is a big Marino fan. I have never heard one of his songs until today.
 

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I remember a '70s interview in GP with Marino. He said he was recovering from an OD in hospital when he picked up the guitar, and the rest as they say was history. The article came with the obligatory "Kids, please don't try this at home." LOL
 
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My opinion on altering covers:
If you're not going to improve on the original (do it better) then you have no fucking business changing it.
"Making it your own" isn't enough unless you can do better.
Nuf sed.

My 2 cents
 

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My opinion on altering covers:
If you're not going to improve on the original (do it better) then you have no fucking business changing it.
"Making it your own" isn't enough unless you can do better.
Nuf sed.

My 2 cents
I'm probably committing the highest level of guitarist sin here, but I like Marino's version better than Jimi's. But I grew up on that sound, not Hendrix.
 

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My opinion on altering covers:
If you're not going to improve on the original (do it better) then you have no fucking business changing it.
"Making it your own" isn't enough unless you can do better.
Nuf sed.

My 2 cents
With artistic endeavors, how do you make something better than the original?

The original was exactly like the originator intended. If was perfect when he completed it. Anything other than his original 'design' is a modification or distortion of the original. You might like something more, but is it better? Can someone make a better Mona Lisa? I don't think so.

Mechanical concepts, like cars or guitars or amps, I think an argument could be made that Brand X is better than Brand Y (features, quality, whatever). But in art? Nope, don't get that.
 

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With artistic endeavors, how do you make something better than the original?
Better execution.

The original was exactly like the originator intended. If was perfect when he completed it.
It was as good as the originator could get it at the time, perhaps but something is not perfect simply by virtue of being complete. There are scads of interviews out there where the artist, after the fact, says he/she wasn't as happy with it as they would have liked.
 

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Better execution.

It was as good as the originator could get it at the time, perhaps but something is not perfect simply by virtue of being complete. There are scads of interviews out there where the artist, after the fact, says he/she wasn't as happy with it as they would have liked.
How do you define "better execution", though?

I know guys who could record a Neil Young song 'better' than him, from a technical POV. But it wouldn't have the passion, vibe, feel of the original. Or the quirks. I don't know if 'better execution' can be define, except on a personal basis. I don't see a universal agreement. While not a big NY fan, I'll happily admit he is obviously great at what he does. Look at how much he's sold and how much passion people have for his music, how much joy they get from it. Can't argue with that.

I also believe artists are their own worst critics. One of my favorites, Devin Townsend, just about universally hates everything he's done. The artist will always 'what if' his own creations, after they've been pressed, printed or dried. It's easy to listen (or look at) to something nailed down and think of what they could have been done better.

Maybe changing that one thing would have made it worse, in the long run, after repeated listenings / viewings? Don't we all do that with arguments and comebacks. "Man, I shoulda said .....". Personally, I'd give a nut (maybe two) just to create one song as great as a few dozen of Heavy Devy's works of art.
 

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How do you define "better execution", though?

I know guys who could record a Neil Young song 'better' than him, from a technical POV. But it wouldn't have the passion, vibe, feel of the original. Or the quirks. I don't know if 'better execution' can be define, except on a personal basis. I don't see a universal agreement.
I agree with this,one man's better is another's schlock.

They are both right to themselves,to suggest that one must be superior or whatever ignores artistic creativity .

Monet and Van Gogh both painted sunflowers,is one better than the other ?
 

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I happen to believe there is a such thing as being a better musician in every way than someone else.
I know many people who are more emotive and have better chops than an uncountable number of artists whom have already sold albums of their own original writing.
There are better musicians in this world.
There's always a bigger fish.
If a superior musician performs a cover and makes it better I think it's wonderful but I, and millions like me, have no interest in listening to some hack job.

To be clear, I'm not talking about bar bands that play covers and I'm especially not talking about new and inexperienced bar bands that are still developing their basic skill-set.
I'm talking about people who take artistic license and the result is a disappointment that leaves the listener asking why.

Also ....
I did say "My two cents" at the end of my original post.
It's an opinion.
Opinions are like belly buttons.
Everybody has one.
This one of mine just happens to be a strongly held one.

Again, this post here is my two cents as well.
 
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