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Discussion Starter #1
I've always used a capo with my acoustic guitar. I've played a lot of bluegrass and its just an accepted tool in order to maintain the bluegrass sound no matter the key.
But when it came to electric guitar I've always looked at it as unprofessional. Starting electric guitar in the 70's it just seemed a no no in the circle of friends and musicians I hung out with.
Lately I've been experimenting with the capo just to get different sounds.
One example: I've been learning the song "Paper Back Writer" by the beatles for a band. The song and signature lick is in G but the singer sings it in E. So in order to learn it and play along with a youtube video I simply put the capo on and played it in the E shape but in the key of G. I also did learn it in G with out the capo. So I played it 3 different ways. In E open, G the way the record is and in the key of G with the cap on the third fret playing the E shape.
To me it sounded the best with the capo on the third fret playing an E shape. So I can understand the use of a capo not for making an easier shape to play but for getting a particular sound.
I'm pretty sure that the Eagles played Hotel California with the capo up around the 7th fret. So I imagine it was to get a particular sound?
 

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Capo can be a very useful tool, to bring different colour and nuances to your playing. I too sometimes use it on electric guitar. Even if I'm not the biggest fan of capo on guitars, I have to say that it can come in handy!
 

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A capo is the easiest way to shift the key of a song you already know - to suit a singer's range for example. Effectively you are re-tuning the guitar and then playing all the same familiar shapes in a new key.

It's technically possible to transpose a song into a new key by changing every chord in the song, and there are many accomplished musicians do exactly that and have no trouble with it, even in real time "on the fly".

I am not one of those accomplished musicians. I use a capo every day.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A capo is the easiest way to shift the key of a song you already know - to suit a singer's range for example. Effectively you are re-tuning the guitar and then playing all the same familiar shapes in a new key.

It's technically possible to transpose a song into a new key by changing every chord in the song, and there are many accomplished musicians do exactly that and have no trouble with it, even in real time "on the fly".

I am not one of those accomplished musicians. I use a capo every day.
Yes I'm one that can transpose on the spot if I know the song well enough. Which is one reason I stayed away from capos for electric. Its strange though as I had no problems using it on an acoustic. But even just playing my acoustics at home I'll throw a capo on, not to enable me to play a particular song but just for the tone change of playing open cowboy chords up higher. It sweetens the sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Capo can be a very useful tool, to bring different colour and nuances to your playing. I too sometimes use it on electric guitar. Even if I'm not the biggest fan of capo on guitars, I have to say that it can come in handy!
In the past I put the capo on an electric simply just to play along to a song on youtube to a guitar tuned different. But the capos I used, keyser and shubb were too finicky with tuning. So I never saw it as practical in a band situation to put a capo on and have to retune. But the elliot elite that I bought goes on quite easy and does not alter the tuning at all.
 

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In the past I put the capo on an electric simply just to play along to a song on youtube to a guitar tuned different. But the capos I used, keyser and shubb were too finicky with tuning. So I never saw it as practical in a band situation to put a capo on and have to retune. But the elliot elite that I bought goes on quite easy and does not alter the tuning at all.

I use the Schubb ones live, and have no issues with bad tuning, on either acoustic or electric guitars.
 

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It you are finding the tuning goes a bit off when you put a capo on try this:

Palm mute all 6 strings near the bridge. Add a little pressure to stretch the strings a bit, then put the capo on. Of course, you will need a capo that can be put on with one hand. I use a Keyser Capo.
 

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It you are finding the tuning goes a bit off when you put a capo on try this:

Palm mute all 6 strings near the bridge. Add a little pressure to stretch the strings a bit, then put the capo on. Of course, you will need a capo that can be put on with one hand. I use a Keyser Capo.
I'll have to try that. I use a Keyser and place it directly on the fret. It's the only way I've found that didn't effect my tuning and bending. I play 8s on my guitar so its very sensitive to pressure.
 
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