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Discussion Starter #1
Been wanting to work with stains and oils for a while and now got 2 bodies that I plan to oil.

Saw some videos of Danish, and Linseed, etc... Tung Oil caught my eye for some reason.

Went to grab some the other day, and Circa 1850 had some, but too big... the smaller container was Tung & Teak Oil though so, something different I guess? Minwax contained Tung oil, but didn't say 100% Pure. I read somewhere to just stick with Lee Valley, and they have it in a few sizes, doesn't cost much more than Home Hardware's selection... but lists 100% Pure, Polymerized, and Polymerized Sealer....?

Anyone use Tung Oil?

I want a slight shine, but also can see and feel the grain... which is why I want to go for an oil.

Any recommendations... of the 3 that Lee Valley has, or the Circa 1850? I like Minwax but from what I've read, it's the furthest from pure in the list.

Oh... guitar wise. 1 guitar is mystery wood, I think basswood with grain, may try to use the leather dye I have, mahogany and a few browns and a black... do something with that. 2md guitar, got the paint off, and it's a really nice solid ash... with some misfortunate stuff happening, I plan to do a 1/8" thick veneer strip of maple and walnut.
 

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You don't want pure unless you are finishing a food-prep surface. Unless explicitly stated all tung oil products are polimerized, which makes it easier to work with and use, but no longer food-safe (nitro and poly ain't food safe either so that's not an issue for guitars). Lee Valley has both pure and polymerized IIRC. The pure has to be prepped/diluted before use (forget the details cuz I never bother with it) or it's a bugger because so viscous.

I have used Circa 1850 before (not pure), but the local store no longer carries that one so now I got a tin of some other brand. Tung and Teak oil (quite sure I've hused that one previously too) is just a little more honest about it not being pure tung oil but is essentially the same thing. Everyone mixes it up a bit different but it's not significant.

I know there are a lot of folks that say you gotta use pure or [insert imaginary problem here], but it's voodoo. I've done multiple instruments (as well as amp headshells, hifi speaker cabs, pedalboards and other non-musical furniture) with the stuff over the years. That includes 1 each electric, acoustic and bass. Mahogany and maple (3 pc) necks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The poly version at Lee Valley, I guess ready to use because said diluted with mineral spirits or something along those lines... produces a more durable coating as well, correct?

Can still apply the same way, with a brush or cloth?

I like the looks of stuff I've seen online with it, plus, just don't want to use spray cans any more than I have to for projects. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Watched this video

Nice to see comparisons done like that.

I've heard of tru-oil, see it mentioned often on forums, but I like the darker effect that tung has.
 

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The poly version at Lee Valley, I guess ready to use because said diluted with mineral spirits or something along those lines... produces a more durable coating as well, correct?

Can still apply the same way, with a brush or cloth?

I like the looks of stuff I've seen online with it, plus, just don't want to use spray cans any more than I have to for projects. :D
Yes, same application but easier because you don't have to work it in with as much (still some - in either case the more the better) friction/heat to get the wood to soak it up. In theory the finish is the same but in practice yes more durable because you are more easily able to penetrate into the wood and build up the finish from there - you can just keep adding coats but it does reach a point of diminishing returns after a bit. Contrary to that comparison vid above, you can build up a surface finish with enough coats. Also you really need to buff with 0000 steel wool between coats, at least after the first couple, which it does not appear this guy did. FYI "Danish oil" = Tung and Teak or similar polimerized tung oil. The durability test at the end is problematic as well. I would argue that the Tru Oil is too brittle (kinda like aged nitro, but not as cool looking); you want a bit of flexibility to the finish on a guitar. I don't know of any finish (not even poly) that will stand up to scraping with a flathead and the oil will behave differently on a non-porus surface like that vs actual wood where it can bond with the coats of oil underneath that are penetrated into the wood fibers.
 
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