The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,581 Posts
Following your topic here Robert, I'd suggest anyone trying to get a good grasp on these triad voicings (inversions) check out a song or 10 that use this type of idea. One I recently learned for my buddy was "School" by Supertramp. Roger Hodgson is a good example (of many) that use this in their style of playing guitar...both on electric and acoustic. I try to apply this to every open position song I know in as many positions as possible on acoustic. If you know your scales and modes in all positions, this lesson can really bump your playing up a notch or 2 on electric because of what you mention in your lesson..

This is a much more important lesson than many out there realize as it builds the foundation of positional chord and scale relationships. Less movement is good movement in guitar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Isn't that and application of the CAGED system ?
Ernie Hawkins teaches that on Homespun DVDs, including simplified three notes chords.
It helped me understand how to climb up the neck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,581 Posts
Isn't that and application of the CAGED system ?
Ernie Hawkins teaches that on Homespun DVDs, including simplified three notes chords.
It helped me understand how to climb up the neck.
Basically the same thing. I personally don't like the whole CAGED Method way of thinking though. Instead of learning how triads (ie: chords) are constructed and the types of notes you can add, subtract, or rearrange to get a different voicing, you're "play the "C shape" here" and play that "D shape" shape there. But it's a great system for those that do not want to spend the time on the theory and at times specific details regarding keys, where the chords lie, which specific note (or tonic interval) is on top of said chord. When you start getting into chords that are a little more intense, ie: Drop 2 chords and trying to build a chord progression under a specific Melody that's contained on the top note of the chord, things could get very dicey with CAGED.

Having said that, that type of chordal Melody is typically used more in a Jazz or Fusion based context, but you'll certainly also hear it from many Rock, Blues, Metal, Country....pick your poison, songs and players. The classical theory wy of learning this is not for everyone, so ya, caged is good in general I suppose. That's just my opinion related to how I learned CHords and Triad Inversions though. I'd like to hear @dolphinstreet 's response to this actually. Robert has a very good way of explaining things...much better than myself I'll admit.,
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top