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Hey All
I'm restoring a yba-1 traynor head, does anyone know were I can get original type grill cloth?
 

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Ah, the age old question . . .

The age old answer: you cannot find it anywhere.

Why freakin Traynor does not start selling old logos and grill cloth I will never know. There is such a massive demand for these things they could make a killing.

TG
 

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"Details, always details!"

Ah, the age old question . . .

The age old answer: you cannot find it anywhere.

Why freakin Traynor does not start selling old logos and grill cloth I will never know. There is such a massive demand for these things they could make a killing.

TG
How would you define "massive demand"? Once again my friend, it's all in the volume. (if you'll pardon the pun)

A custom logo or grill cloth pattern can only be ordered in quantity. Knowing Yorkville as I do if they couldn't justify buying by the thousands or by the kilometre they wouldn't bother. To order a 100 or so logos to satisfy the hobby restoration market would not seem to be good business. The potential profit even with a huge markup would seem like micenuts to Yorkville.

As for support for the older amps, how much support do you find for schematics at Fender's modern site? Look for yourself and you'll see that it's worse than Traynor.

Lots of guys are looking for Traynor knobs and lament how Yorkville can't help them. There are reasons for this. When Pete first made his amps he chose a catalogue knob he could easily buy cheap from a number of vendors. Today, NOBODY makes that knob! That's why we can't find them. What was Yorkville/Traynor supposed to do? Lay in 10,000 extra knobs and keep them in stock as replacements for 40 years? Especially when 40 years ago how would you know that your amps would BECOME collector pieces? Traynor didn't know for sure if his next batch would even sell.

There's also some unspoken "dirty laundry" in the Traynor history that you won't find in any official FAQ - certainly not the one on the Yorkville site. Pete and Yorkville were a good marriage for some years. He was the quintessential mad scientist of rock and roll! He truly wanted to make great and wonderful amps that would please players everywhere.

As the company grew it seemed that although no one wore a tie perhaps they should have. It was more and more run by "suits" who had a totally different vision than Pete. They saw their money in PA and sound reinforcement, in taking on the Gibson master distributor role for Canada, in (gasp!) solid state amps 'cuz they were cheaper to make with more profit margin.

To make a short story long, in the 80's Pete finally bailed. He retired into the country and wanted nothing more to do with "business". Many strongly suspect that not only did he not get the respect he deserved from the company built on his back but he didn't get nearly as much money as he deserved either. We'll likely never know. Pete's too much of a gentleman to talk about it. Still, it's no secret that he was NOT happy!

It must have been a ballbreaker to get turned down for budget for a new solid state bass amp design and then watch Sunn or Acoustic come out with the same damn thing.

When Pete left it seems Yorkville just totally abandoned its tube amp line and any parts left in inventory. It was about 15 years before there was a new champion in engineering and some support from marketing who were following the Ebay demand for the old amps and we saw the birth of the YCV series. I had a bet for a few beer with one of their salesmen. Their first production run was for 500 units and I bet they would sell out in a few months. I was right and he was wrong. They had to do a second run right away! Never did get my beer, as I recall.:mad:

So my point is that there are practical reasons why companies don't support their legacy products. If we want a logo it might be more successful to talk to people like Antique Radio. They've got repros of Fender, Marshall and other major names for faceplates and stuff. They're based on lower volume stuff and might see an opportunity to add old Traynor logos or cloth to the mix.

Maybe if Pete had stayed...

:food-smiley-004:
 

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How would you define "massive demand"? Once again my friend, it's all in the volume. (if you'll pardon the pun)

A custom logo or grill cloth pattern can only be ordered in quantity. Knowing Yorkville as I do if they couldn't justify buying by the thousands or by the kilometre they wouldn't bother. To order a 100 or so logos to satisfy the hobby restoration market would not seem to be good business. The potential profit even with a huge markup would seem like micenuts to Yorkville.

To make a short story long, in the 80's Pete finally bailed.

When Pete left it seems Yorkville just totally abandoned its tube amp line and any parts left in inventory.

So my point is that there are practical reasons why companies don't support their legacy products. If we want a logo it might be more successful to talk to people like Antique Radio. They've got repros of Fender, Marshall and other major names for faceplates and stuff. They're based on lower volume stuff and might see an opportunity to add old Traynor logos or cloth to the mix.

:food-smiley-004:
Good post Bill,

Of course I'm not sure how many people are looking for logos but given how many old Traynor amps are missing logos (everyone was embarrassed to play them so they ripped off the logo) I think it is well above 100. Ebay sometimes becomes frenzied when a logo goes up for bid.

You are right though, perhaps a smaller shop specializing in repros would be a better way to go. Do you know anyone at Antique Radio who might be able to get this going?

BTW, I think Pete actually left in 1976 and tube amp production went on until about 1980 or 1981. Some of the post-Pete amps still sound good but they don't sound like the older ones.

I forget who complained about a lack of service for old Traynors but no company is going to freely service amps they made 30 years ago. The good thing about these old Traynors is that the are nicely laid out, the schematics are available online, and any decent tech should easily be able to get one up and running. Of course, I don't need to tell you that! :)

TG
 

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The factory is 5 min from my house. I contacted them with the same question. The answer was...when the last of the old stock was used up, that was it. No more coming in, ever.
Your only chance of scoring some cloth, used of course, is to buy some old Traynor cab and use that fabric on your amp or smaller cab.
 
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