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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Asking all the other GC dads/moms/bouncy people -- what do you do with a trampoline in the winter? I put up a good-sized one in our backyard for the kids, and as we approach fall, I have no freaking clue what to do to preserve it over the winter. Do I need to take off the centre (bouncy) portion? Leave it?

Please don't tell me I need to fully dismantle this thing...
 

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Asking all the other GC dads/moms/bouncy people -- what do you do with a trampoline in the winter? I put up a good-sized one in our backyard for the kids, and as we approach fall, I have no freaking clue what to do to preserve it over the winter. Do I need to take off the centre (bouncy) portion? Leave it?

Please don't tell me I need to fully dismantle this thing...
We never dismantled ours. We had two over the years and I think they were around 15' in diameter (round).

We just tarped (with bungie cables) ours in the winter and brushed the snow off when it built up.
 

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Haven't had one for years, but it still lives on! We always took the centre out, and springs off the frame. The "well, duh" aspect of not letting the springs sit unused for a few months in wet conditions kept them from getting rusty. We stored the centre, springs, and padded side surround in the basement over the winter. We did that for all the years we had it in our yard, and my bro in law still does it now that he has it. That thing is old, but still rockin'. Err... bouncin'!
 

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Yup. If it's not going to be used, you should take the bouncing surface off as it will load up with snow and eventually stretch the springs. My son used to use it all winter so we left it up and swept it off after every snowfall. If it's going to be used in winter, you'll probably want to pick up some of those grippy socks that they sell at those commercial indoor trampoline parks as bare feet get cold and regular socks will slip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. My thinking was to pull the springs and....I dunno, drum head?...and leave the rest. Maybe the netting too.
 

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^^^ Ours was so old it didn't even have netting. Old school fun! and, ours was waaaaaaay more bouncy than the ones bought even a few years later. Trampolines are dangerous, ours was borderline suicidal. Thankfully, nothing more than a few bumps & bruises in all those years.
 

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We have a spring free type, and we take the outside netting down then tip the whole thing on its side to keep snow from building up.
 

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I figured the thing would last long enough for the kids to outgrow it before I would need to start disassembling it every fall.

I was right.
 

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We had a Springfree type for about 7 years. Usually we would take down the side netting and put a tarp over the bouncing surface and that was more than fine. If there had been a huge snowfall then we'd sweep the excess off.
 

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Im on the west coast, but we left ours up year around, the kids used it year around too. Ours was a very large rectangle one. After 5 years when We did give it away, the metal frames where they went together were a bit difficult to take apart, other than that no problems.
 

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I would plasti- dip or spray paint the entire frame and then tarp it. When spring rolls around, I’d WD-40 or Vaseline the hell out of the springs and she’s probably good to go.

I don’t have children yet, but if they are anything like I was as a child and I’m anything like my grandfather was. There is no chance in hell that a trampoline will ever be a thing lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The kids like it, but aren't 100 percent enthusiastic yet.

As for them outgrowing it, the thing is rated to 440 pounds, so I think we're good unless my son turns into a glandular oddity. I had to buy one that I could get on it if needed without worrying about SPROING! followed by sudden downward motion.
 
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