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Local pronounciation of "Toronto"

  • Turonno

    Votes: 8 66.7%
  • Toronna (sometimes Toronno)

    Votes: 4 33.3%
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I just saw this , this morning and thought, WTF?


Turonno License Plate Lapel


To me it was always Torrona (rhymes with "Donna" as per the Cannuk classic Switchin to Glide). With some leeway given to the terminal vowel e.g how drunk you are, also contextually - e.g. O (vs A) if speaking to non-native; full T if speaking to someone that's not even here (e.g. on the phone with tech support). But that first vowel is definately an O not a U... right?

Frankly, at this point the only person who could convince me that Turonno is correct is Roscoe from Chimo who has become my yardstick for all things Hoser, but I am curious what the consensus here would be.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How about 'Toronto' ?
I'll forgive you because you're an Ontario-hating British Columbian. Yes, obviously we all say it that way in a formal setting (sober and wearing a suit or, as suggested in my OP, talking on the phone to someone not from here and not present here), but like in everyday casual conversation to other locals when we are not trying to be proper at all and not employing any pretense or otherwise being mindful about it.

I always thought that it's Tranna.
I consider that a subset of Toronna, but more like: T 'ronna. Def not 2 As in there though I could understand writting it out that way ( because it is fundamentally a spoken-only word) as Tran vs Tron are very close especially when slurred and phonetics can be a tad subjective.

I am also starting to wonder if there are regional accents in play here.
 

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I'll forgive you because you're an Ontario-hating British Columbian.
That's funny because if we said it any other way here locally, no-one would know what we were talking about. A little hint why is our connection to the Far East.
My biggest connection too to Toronto is business related so it stands it would be properly pronounced. ( I actually really like Ontario, as I do most of Canada)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah, because you need some sort of credentials to edit/create those entries. I'd disqualify it based on the example sentence - no hoser talks about the beautiful game that way; probably written by a Yank (it does sound like a Toledo, maybe Rochester, accent).

Oh and to prove my first point, I could just hit the button on this:
upload_2018-3-26_14-26-10.png
 

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The locals always seem to have a unique way of pronouncing their home town names. When I went to Vancouver a few years back I noticed all the locals seemed to pronounce it VanQuever.
 

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I think the last vowel is the critical one. Before switchin' to glide there was this, though it's still a little vague. ;)

 

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Traunna

(I did work there for 35 years)
 

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Again, think we're having a phonetic nitpick here: 'au' in this case sounds like the 'o' in T 'ronna above (see 'auto' vs 'electron')
Damn right !!*#*(
 

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The locals always seem to have a unique way of pronouncing their home town names. When I went to Vancouver a few years back I noticed all the locals seemed to pronounce it VanQuever.
Plus, you need to "up talk" and raise the pitch of your voice as you say it so that the "Van-Q-ver" sounds like a question: "Van-Q-ver?"
 

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Name of Toronto - Wikipedia

Mnjikaning Fish Weirs - Wikipedia

"The weirs – historically called ouentaronk (Huron) and tkaronto (Mohawk) – are believed to have provided the City of Toronto with its name, following a series of copy errors.[3][4] They were in use for about 5,000 years, until about the early 1700s.[5] Samuel de Champlain recorded their existence on September 1, 1615, when he passed the weirs with the Huron en route to the battle with the Iroquois on the south east side of Lake Ontario."

Interesting that it appears to have been the prior name of the Atherley Narrows. I've stopped there a few times over the years to fish, buy gas, etc. The Atherley Arms Hotel was some respite too, but that was many years ago.

It would be interesting to hear how it was, or might have been, originally pronounced. If my Mum was still alive (she spoke some Ojibway, and had experience with Blackfoot and Mohawk peoples) she might have some idea. Anyone?

As for how my family pronounces Toronto, some were even born there, others live there (though God only knows why) T'ronna or T'raunna, I suppose, except they're less inclined to those than Toronto.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Apparently the Turonno people are a slim silent majority so far. All you T 'ronna/T' raunna people click option 2 dammit.
 
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