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Discussion Starter #1
It appears to make some difference? Can you hear the difference?

 

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I've never tried one. Maybe it makes your acoustic sound better. Can't imagine it being more fun than just playing your guitar. There are so many other gear related items I'd rather spend my money on before something like this.
So if you leave it on your guitar for 3 or 4 days, trying to get your guitar to sound better thats 3 or 4 days I could have been just enjoying how my guitar sounds now.
 

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There may be some value to it, but I generally play the crap out of new guitars when I get them so I don't really require artificial means. Most of my instruments hang on the walls, exposed to every vibration and sound wave that happens here (stereo, TV, lessons, recording, the rumble of trucks passing by...I mean, when I sneeze every instrument starts ringing) so though it may be more gradual an affect, if it does indeed help mature the tone, then I don't need a Tonerite. Years ago some folks would advocate setting their guitars in front of their stereo speakers for the same purpose.

We got along just fine for generations without, and all those classic guitar tones were achieved without. Not that we shouldn't experiment mind you, but my instincts tell me that aging a guitar should be like aging wine.
 

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It worked for me on a couple of new guitars, less so on a couple of others. I found it helped my J-45 True Vintage to "open up", giving it a warmer, more open sound, more bass and more punch. It had a similar effect on my Halcyon NL-00. In both instances, I played the guitar with new strings prior to Tonerite and then put new strings on after Tonerite. On my Yamaha LL16 ARE (now sold), it had some effect, but not as noticeable as with the previous two. For my Hummingbird, it didn't do as much, but that's a 12-year-old guitar.

I've never tried one. Maybe it makes your acoustic sound better. Can't imagine it being more fun than just playing your guitar. There are so many other gear related items I'd rather spend my money on before something like this.
So if you leave it on your guitar for 3 or 4 days, trying to get your guitar to sound better thats 3 or 4 days I could have been just enjoying how my guitar sounds now.
It's not more fun than playing your guitar, but you can still play your guitar while giving it the Tonerite treatment. You take the Tonerite off, play it, then put it back on when you're done. Unless, that is, you've figured out how to play 24/7 for a week (please share your secret :)). I found it helped the guitar sound better and I have several guitars I can play at any given time, so if one is getting treatment, I won't lack for something to play.

There may be some value to it, but I generally play the crap out of new guitars when I get them so I don't really require artificial means. Most of my instruments hang on the walls, exposed to every vibration and sound wave that happens here (stereo, TV, lessons, recording, the rumble of trucks passing by...I mean, when I sneeze every instrument starts ringing) so though it may be more gradual an affect, if it does indeed help mature the tone, then I don't need a Tonerite. Years ago some folks would advocate setting their guitars in front of their stereo speakers for the same purpose.

We got along just fine for generations without, and all those classic guitar tones were achieved without. Not that we shouldn't experiment mind you, but my instincts tell me that aging a guitar should be like aging wine.
Appeal to tradition is a logical fallacy. We also got along "just fine" for generations without antibiotics, cars and running water :D.

Sure, you can probably have the same effect playing the guitar for many hours over many weeks or months, but putting the Tonerite on it when you're not playing it for the space of a week or two does help accelerate the process, based on my experience. Whether it's worth it to do so or not is completely up to the guitar's owner. I found it to be interesting and helpful and I was highly skeptical when I first got it. I tracked down a slightly used floor model on EBay because I was skeptical enough to not want to pay full retail. I have been convinced, as has my dad. Is it necessary? No, but it works.
 

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Register a loud NAY for me ! :p
Got a look at something alike years ago...
I am now getting rid of electronics and gadgets...
So will not add any in the "failed attemps drawer".
 

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Having talked with famous guitar builders ( actually several ) who have used it on some of their new builds they has stated that to them it made a difference on the guitar and understanding the logic of what it is suppose to do it makes sense that it does the wood.
So like on the other forum we see lots who agree and lots who say it is a waste of time and money which is perfectly fine for them to think whatever they want for those that believe well they may have coaxed out a sound from their instrument that takes years of playing so me I'm on board as they had nothing to gain from saying they thought it helped and for the rest well take your time and enjoy your guitars
 

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My D18 felt tight when I first got it and it seemed to get played in over maybe a year or less but it also sounded great to begin with so no big deal. I have 3 other decent dreads and everyone of them it was "that guitar sounds great I have to buy it right now" so if all of them stayed the same as when I bought them I'd be OK with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mooh said:
I mean, when I sneeze every instrument starts ringing

What a great line. I might steal that for a love song...

"Baby when you sneeze, every instrument starts to ring..."
But it couldn't be just any old sneeze. Mooh, would have to teach you how to sneeze in tune.:)
 

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My D18 felt tight when I first got it and it seemed to get played in over maybe a year or less but it also sounded great to begin with so no big deal. I have 3 other decent dreads and everyone of them it was "that guitar sounds great I have to buy it right now" so if all of them stayed the same as when I bought them I'd be OK with that.
Thats how I feel. Loved the sound of my guitars on day 1 and would be fine with them sounding that way from now on. The sound of a guitar maturing has to do with how much its played and the wood getting older. Technologies like the Toneright and wood torrefication try to accelerate this process and there will always be those of us that do not buy in to it or don't care. I'm not motivated to buy a device to play my guitar but I'm not saying that it doesn't work. I just don't care enough to find out for my self. If I get curious enough to find out for my self one day I'll buy one.
One of my Martins has a VTS top (torrefication) and one does not. I don't really know if the torrefied top makes it sound like a prewar but I have compared it directly to real 1941 vintage D-28 (the same year my authentic is based on) and it did not sound the same. Dramatic difference.
As much as some of these technologies give us hope for a new guitar to sound like a well played in old guitar I have a feeling nothing beats the sound of an 80 year old guitar.
 

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To me it killed the briteness in the video. After the Tonerite it sounded dark and muddy which the freq analyzer backed up. Maybe it was an improvement in real life. On the video it sucked. I always thought old guitars sounded better but thought it was due to drier wood and crystallized pitch. Never once have I heard vibrations improve a guitar. It does seem to make an objective difference though.
 

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I always thought old guitars sounded better but thought it was due to drier wood and crystallized pitch.
Ha, I thought I was crazy thinking my Seagull MiniJumbo sounds better in the winter than the summer.
after 10 years I'm convinced .
 

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Guitar geeks addicted to gear will apparently buy all sorts if crap to feed the monster. Buying guitars after awhile is expensive and soul hurting so we turn our attention to trinkets and trash. Fancy expensive picks, capos, straps, buttons, tuners, all with promise of better performance. Tonerites no exception in my mind at least. Just more trash. Tones is talent.
Having said this I am going to sort my guitar junk drawer today.
 

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To me it killed the briteness in the video. After the Tonerite it sounded dark and muddy which the freq analyzer backed up. Maybe it was an improvement in real life. On the video it sucked.
That was the impression I was left with after listening to the video as well.

It also seemed to me that a greater difference in tone could be had by just changing the weight/material of the picked used.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That was the impression I was left with after listening to the video as well.

It also seemed to me that a greater difference in tone could be had by just changing the weight/material of the picked used.
The pick manufacturers will love you for this post and you are right.
 
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I don't think that guy is a good enough guitar player to strum the exact same way after 1 week. I was very disappointed to see the before graph line yellow on a yellow background, while the after was high contrast blue on yellow. I think the entire test was bad, and the device probably just breaks in the strings.
 
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