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I was changing the strings on my acoustic guitar this afternoon and I put a wee bit of Haws lemon oil on my fret board. I have been doing this for years as it was suggested to me my a guitar tech.

I have a Takamine with a solid cedar top, and Koa sides and back, matte finnish, and I was really tempted to give the whole guitar an oil...but then I stopped because I wasn't sure if this was a good idea.

Does anybody with a matte finnish guitar oil the body -front and back?...would it effect the sound?

I'm the kind of guy who leaves my guitars out in various rooms, so I have to take my pleasure with my pain with respect to guitars drying out (because of not having the appropriate amount of humidity). I hate keeping my guitars in cases, but I have paid the price. That's why I have the oil question.

cheers, and have a great day
 

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For the 35 years or so that I have owned both acoustic and electric guitars I have only ever oiled the fretboards. This has had no adverse affects that I know of. I just wipe down/ polish the body with a soft cloth. Now humidity and acoustic guitars that is another subject.......
 

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well I know that putting lemon oil on maple is a very bad idea....it can discolor it. At least thats what the back of my dunlop lemon oil says. I would definately not put any lemon oil on the body dude...not necessary.
 

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olive oil

I have used Olive oil, but only on the neck.
 

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88% humidity?

In Alberta we call that rain.
 

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In regards to putting lemon oil on your matte finish, don't do it. The best way to do maintenance on your matte finish is a damp cloth and dry it off. Don't use wax eather. As for the fret board use an approved fret board oil like someone else said "fret docter". Lemon oil is not really a good oil for your finger board, there is too much water in it and it really does on do a good job. Stewmac sells a great fret board oil that I use but if your finger board is maple then it should have lacquer on it.
Dennis
 

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Another nod to Fret Doctor.
I've used Haws for 20 years on my rosewoods with no ill effects but when I bought my first Les Paul last year I was concerne about the binding. I now use Fret Doctor on all my RW fret boards. It's wonderful stuff!!! Much nicer than Haws.

Sean
 

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i like to keep my guitars out in the open too, incentive to play them all a little, but i have too many for this, lots are in cases, many are stacked in corners and under the bed etc. i bought a decent digital hygrometer, and have several cheap analog ones here n there, monitoring the humidity in my room-i dont let it go below 40%.
ive used oil on new acquisitions that had dry fretboards(with fret ends sticking out) itll hydrate the wood to a point where the wood sorta rejuvinates- expands- and then the fret ends dont need to be filed down much. but on a well hydrated guitar i hate the feel of oil- and if done to excess it can unseat frets- maybe not saying dont oil- but just so yu kno- go lightly would be the advice id give- if the guitar plays and feels fine i would not oil it- for certain. i wipe all my stuff with naptha on a tshirt at every string change and leave it at that
 

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I've seen many techs recommend bore oil (usually used for horns) for fretboards. I wouldn't use anything on the body.
 

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From Simon & Patrick's website-
What do you recommend I clean my Simon & Patrick with?
Do not use any wax based products on the guitar, especially on the top! This will cause unwanted wax build up over time which will impede the top from vibrating. Instead use a small amount of soap based guitar polish sprayed on a cloth (never directly on the guitar) and gently wipe off your guitar. For the fingerboard we suggest removing the strings and applying Lemon or Danish oil to a cloth and then working it into your fingerboard. Let the oil soak in for a few minutes and then wipe off the excess. This should be done once a year on rosewood or ebony fingerboards only. Doing so not only cleans, but conditions your fingerboard against cracking and keeps it from losing its luster.
http://www.simonandpatrick.com/faqs.htm
 
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