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Discussion Starter #1
At least for the next little while.
Played in a small bar last night. 4 piece band and the corner we were in was pretty tight.
I was standing beside my amp and could just barely hear it.
Subconsciously, this made me dig into my strings harder than usual.
I hate using picks on bass. lol.

20180617_072707.jpg
 

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Holy [email protected]&$....

I've never gotten that bruised even after 8 hrs straight of playing! :eek:

You need to build up some corn or tape up your finger with hockey tape...

Hope the recovery is not to painful. ..:confused:

Get a bigger bass amp !

I only use a bass pick when a get finger cramps... hate those...
 

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Getting a bigger amp doesnt mean you have to drown them out. Look at all the guys with halfstacks who turn down :p
 

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I once did something like that before I realized my first finger kept hitting the screw on the neck pickup of my first bass...

Don't give up---unless you want to use a pick...
 

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I’ve got the pick for you. And I’d say one you go pick with good tone, it’s hard to go back. There are more available dynamics. Your photo is the evidence that you wanted more forte

Nevertheless the pick is no 2nd fiddle. It’s legit. It’s my preference live on bass.
 

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I played bass for years before I picked up guitar and for some silly reason wouldn't dare use a pick until I heard Bobby Vega use one.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Used one (of three that I took) at tonight's rehearsal.
Took 3 songs to used to it, plus shortening the strap to raise my bass a bit.
Feels weird, but I can get used to it.
Just have to drill a hole or file the pick for grip.
Kept rolling around between my thumb and finger as I played.

Adapt and conquer!
 

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Okay, I'll admit it -- I'm odd.

I use a thumbpick on bass. Have done since I started playing bass in the mid '70s, because that was what I played guitar with. I use and really like the Herco blue nylon thumbpicks (again, because that was what I played guitar with); they were a little hard to find for a while so I bought a gross of them when I found somebody who had them. They've since gotten easier to find.

They do wear out, though, especially if you use roundwound strings.

:eek: It turns out that, now that they come from Jim Dunlop, they're available in a choice of 4 gauges: Light, Medium, Heavy, and Extra Heavy. I wonder if anybody sells sampler packs... (further consideration suggests that the web page is simply broken, and shouldn't show anything of the sort for these guys :rolleyes: )

And -- according to the HERCO® THUMBPICKS   website, "These picks provide long life and excellent memory." I don't know about the first part, but the second part hasn't worked on me...
 

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Light touch .....let the bass amp do the work. Get an extension cab, stick it underneath ....no bigger footprint and now you can hear and still feel your pant legs move.
 

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Little hint if you can't hear the bass: try to make sure the amp is on the same level as your feet so you can feel it. Don't put it up on a stand or chair or riser or something. It you want it to point at your head, try leaning it back, but make sure that it is resonating the floor so that you can feel it with your feet. Sometimes if you can't hear it, feeling can help a ton.

Nevertheless the pick is no 2nd fiddle. It’s legit. It’s my preference live on bass.
I don't get why some people say, "I'll never play bass with a pick!" Use the tools that sound the best for the job, don't limit yourself to some weird rules. Lots of great players sometimes use a pick and sometimes don't. I'll even use a pick and fingers in the same song as I've become quite adept at hiding the pick in one finger while the others continue to play. Sometimes I'll use a pick to get some attack and note definition back if the person running sound thinks the EQ for the bass should be mush. Listen to what sounds best for the situation and adapt your style to fit.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Little hint if you can't hear the bass: try to make sure the amp is on the same level as your feet so you can feel it. Don't put it up on a stand or chair or riser or something. It you want it to point at your head, try leaning it back, but make sure that it is resonating the floor so that you can feel it with your feet. Sometimes if you can't hear it, feeling can help a ton.
Hmm. Now that you mention it, there was one gig where it was
on the floor whereas at other gigs, I had it on a milk crate.
I could hear/feel it on the floor better. Thanks.
I'm keeping my eyes out for an extension cab too. Either a 112 or 210.
 

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I don't get why some people say, "I'll never play bass with a pick!" Use the tools that sound the best for the job, don't limit yourself to some weird rules. Lots of great players sometimes use a pick and sometimes don't. I'll even use a pick and fingers in the same song as I've become quite adept at hiding the pick in one finger while the others continue to play. Sometimes I'll use a pick to get some attack and note definition back if the person running sound thinks the EQ for the bass should be mush. Listen to what sounds best for the situation and adapt your style to fit.
I probably play bass with my fingers about 98% of the time
But sometimes I prefer a pick--certain rhythms I find sound better with a pick
(& are easier for me to play with a pick)
But most work better for me with my fingers...
So I don't rule it out, but I know some who do
 
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Okay, I'll admit it -- I'm odd.

I use a thumbpick on bass. Have done since I started playing bass in the mid '70s, because that was what I played guitar with. I use and really like the Herco blue nylon thumbpicks (again, because that was what I played guitar with); they were a little hard to find for a while so I bought a gross of them when I found somebody who had them. They've since gotten easier to find.

They do wear out, though, especially if you use roundwound strings.

:eek: It turns out that, now that they come from Jim Dunlop, they're available in a choice of 4 gauges: Light, Medium, Heavy, and Extra Heavy. I wonder if anybody sells sampler packs... (further consideration suggests that the web page is simply broken, and shouldn't show anything of the sort for these guys :rolleyes: )

And -- according to the HERCO® THUMBPICKS website, "These picks provide long life and excellent memory." I don't know about the first part, but the second part hasn't worked on me...
The previous bass player in my band used a thumbpick and his tone was amazing. His style sounded like he was playing an upright, and on some recordings people thought he was.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
I did try that and it worked for a bit.
Scrapped off after a couple of songs.
I'm all healed now btw.
 

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Carol Kay says use a pick for everything. ;)
Jamerson says hook it with yer index finger only - I'd put him on par with Kay for influence and ubiquity. All of Jamaica plays fingerstyle too.

Both are valid approaches; it's all a matter of what suits the situation best. I started out exclusively fingerstyle and hated the pick sound. Switched to pick when I started playing more riffy (chords) surrogate rhythm guitar parts and just never went back even for the more melodic songs. I try to play some stuff fingerstyle at practice occasionally so I don't lose the technique, but not as often as I should.

A pick will get you a significantly more defined attack; cuts in a mix better (fingerstyle sounds better solo'd - that's what I suspect makes people hate picks for bass) so works better for dense rock. If sparser folk or dreamy/dubby stuff then stick with fingerstyle; you just need a bigger amp (or even just a more efficient speaker to give you that little bit more). That Markbass rig should be enough, so see below.

Another thing I find is just stage sound - small stages (esp with monitors) are just bad for being able to hear yourself. You will never hear yourself well standing next to your amp. You need to be a few feet at least in front. Sometimes that's not possible so aim that speaker at yourself (lay the amp flat on it's back if you have to) - also gives a nice diffuse sound to the audience). On a small stage I will often ask the guitard to have our amps opposite sides from us for that reason. Makes it more of a walk to tweak, but at least you can hear yourself. Additionally, and compounding this, would be if bass was coming through the monitors (if any). 2 sources of the same sound, facing each other = out of phase and at least partial cancellation so it's at least muddy and indistinct if not inaudible. Turning up just makes it worse in such cases. Especially on small stages - only kick and vox (and anything also not amplified like horns or DI only keys) in the monitors and everyone will be happier;stage volume can be lower.
 
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