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Having many friends that speak ASL (American Sign Language) and other sign languages, this article was of lots of interest to me. With the amount of interpreters available these days, it would not be difficult to find someone for these concerts and it wouldn't cost a lot either. In some cases, the extra tickets would more than pay the interpreters' fee.

'I rely on the beats and vibrations': Lack of sign language at concerts frustrates deaf Canadians

Shut out: Lack of sign language at concerts frustrates deaf Canadians
While videos of music interpreters go viral in the U.S., deaf music fans in Canada wait for change
By Eli Glasner, CBC News Posted: Nov 18, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 18, 2017 10:36 AM ET


Gaitrie lost her hearing at the age of nine months. But like many deaf and hearing-impaired Canadians, she has other ways to enjoy music. (Eli Glasner)


Gaitrie Persaud didn't think she could go see Jay Z perform in Toronto next week — not because she's deaf but because she didn't know if the venue would provide the sign language interpreter she requires.

Persaud, 31, lost her hearing at the age of nine months. But like many deaf and hard of hearing Canadians, she and her friends find ways to enjoy music. On a recent afternoon in Rexdale, in Toronto's west end, she and two friends who are also hard of hearing — Sidra Khan, 24, and Mellisa Casuga, 36 — push back the coffee table so they can dance along to Rihanna and Jay Z's Talk That Talk.

"It feels like my body has this urgency to move even though I can't hear," Persaud said.

'It feels like my body has this urgency to move even though I can't hear.'- Gaitrie Persaud
"I rely on the beats and vibrations. It's like an electrical current going through my body."

On the TV, a captioned YouTube video of the song is blasting, the volume cranked so Persaud and her friends can feel the vibrations through the floor. As the lyrics scroll by, their hands are a flurry of gestures as they use American Sign Language (ASL) to sing along in their own way.
 
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Music. Always a blessing.

Imagine whining about some genre/artist you hate, when there are deaf people and out there...
 

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Music. Always a blessing.

Imagine whining about some genre/artist you hate, when there are deaf people and out there...
We can't be that general about all music. Some of it portrays violence, racism, immoral issues and other negative themes. So, like in other areas of our life, we need to make wise choices to protect us against negative influences.

I have been to events with hundreds of deaf people where they sang and they love it as much as hearing people do. Perhaps because of signing the song, they enjoy it in a way many hearing people miss out on.
 
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