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This is Thursday.
Four days ago, Sunday, at about noon,
I went to visit the lead guitarist in our new band.
I haven't played out in years.
He has played out steadily for the past 44 years.
we had a few jam/rehearsals and were working out some ideas.
When I saw him on Sunday his speech was slurred,
and he had trouble picking up his coffee.
He was having a stroke.
He survived.
But
His life will be completely different.
He was the best guitar player I have ever heard.
Now he is working on learning how to walk again.
And speak clearly and use his right hand.
He is upbeat and hopeful.
So am I.
 

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I wish and hope for a quick and total recovery.

Personal recent story:
My mom suffered a mild stroke on a Good Friday. She couldn't speak (her side of mouth was "paralyzed"), she couldn't lift one of her arms and she has 82 years.

I arrived a two days after that, and she was almost completely recovered. Speech was back to normal. Arm almost.
In about two weeks from then she was completely fine.

I hope and pray for your friends quick and complete recovery

yours truly
Bojan
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank you for the kind thoughts
Many of us on the forum are not kids.
Enjoy the time you have.
Play lots, play loud.
Laugh
the clock is ticking
 

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Best wishes. What a guy that he is so upbeat. (I think I might be bummed out and resentful.) Here's hoping for the best possible outcome!
 

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I've told this story before, but it bears repeating. In the early 80's my dad - younger then than I am now - was coming off his second stroke. His speech was fine but he had significant loss of balance, and an inability to judge the volume of his own speech (which remained at a constant conversational level, whether he thought he was whispering or shouting). The balance thing plagued him, and required constant use of a cane. To simply turn around while standing required about 8 shuffled steps. He walked like a 90 year-old, despite being a mere 61.

My thesis supervisor's wife worked in rehab medicine with stroke patients, so when my dad came out for a visit we arranged for him to have a consult with her. She was using vibrational stimulation as an aid to stroke recovery, based on a great deal of clinical anecdotal reports of patients who regained function faster than expected. She herself had seen patients who used electric shavers regain speech faster, rural patients who propped up the chainsaw on their bum arm regain use of it faster than expected, and so on.

She gave my dad a quick functional assessment, asking him to walk to the end of the room turn around and walk back, and seeing how he recovered his balance when pushed. She then pulled out a big vibrator that had an intensity control (1980-style, so it looked like a Roman column with a rounded end), cranked it up, put it in his right hand, and asked him to repeat the walking task. To our and his utter amazement, when it cam time to turn around, instead of 8 shuffled steps to do a 180, he deftly pivoted on one foot and swung around. It was like he had been bullshitting us all those years, and was as close to a miracle as I ever saw or likely will ever see. The instantaneous recovery of that particular function was so unexpected, he couldn't stop laughing.

The intent for her patients was to start out with intense vibrational stimulation, and gradually reduce intensity as recovery progressed. From her perspective, she felt that pretty much any intense stimulus could have been used for his type of stroke, but vibration was something that was not socially disruptive, and didn't affect conscious attention the way that loud sounds or strobe lights or strong smells might. My dad quickly learned how to hold the item and keep it hidden in his shirtsleeve so that the vibration could be sensed by him alone. Though he didn't live all that much longer (another 18 months or so), he never used a cane again for the rest of his life, and the fact that he reclaimed something he was told he had lost forever gave him hope.

As I understand it, a more formal approach to use of vibrational therapy has been employed over the subsequent 35 years, although it is not for every sort of stroke. Still, it is noninvasive, harmless, inexpensive, and very adaptable. No harm in trying something like attaching a buzzer or other vibrating object to his fretting arm, or something like that.
 

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First certainly hope your firned gets better...
Strokes, heart attacks, etc--or anything that could be one--is a serious thing--but with stuff we know now they can be treated better--but yeah--scary stuff
I keep thinking of stuff i am leaving undone.
Right now I am too tired to do any of it (And some of it would disturb those asleep in the house.)
 

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It seems from your post that you were there when it happened. Having someone there who could get you help soon is a very good thing as others have said.
 
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