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Seriously, I'm done.............................
Nahhh. As Dave used to say right before stupid pet tricks: "It's an exhibition, not a competition. So please, no wagering."

Besides, he had Youtube as kid. That's a huge advantage. At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
 

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Haha. Write your own material, then nobody can steal your thunder.

This is why I did not participate in the "hero" thread. Nothing (except booze and dope) has interferred more with my music than comparing myself to others. I am my hero.

Everytime I quit, when I came back to my own material, I thought: "hey, that's not bad!"

Also, non-musicians seemed to really like my stuff.

Finally, guys who were "way better" than me, were always impressed whenever I did ANYTHING that they hadn't done.

Being original is what does it for me. Your mileage may vary.
 

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Decades back, that sort of proficiency was indicative of something truly special about the individual. But decades later, while one should probably still bow to the proficiency that comes from dedication and practice, the number of tools available to learners have multiplied. In 1971, we had NO tablature, no transcriptions of solos, no equipment for sampling or slowing down some virtuoso's playing, no video lessons showing where to put your fingers, not all that much music available to learn from (maybe you knew someone who owned a copy of Wheels of Fire or East-West, but that was pretty much it, with the exception of 15-second outbursts here and there in the middle of 2:30 radio songs), and beginner instruments typically had the sort of action that required a C-clamp to fret the string. We weren't fighting an uphill battle; we were trying to scale a kilometer-high cliff, that was Teflon-coated, and we were wearing mittens and billy-boots.

So, I don't wish to take anything away from the 12 and 14 year-old prodigies, but we could have probably accomplished much of the same had we dedicated ourselves to the same degree WITH the plethora of assistance that contemporary technology provides to the eager learner. Don't be so hard on yourself.

 

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Decades back, that sort of proficiency was indicative of something truly special about the individual. But decades later, while one should probably still bow to the proficiency that comes from dedication and practice, the number of tools available to learners have multiplied. In 1971, we had NO tablature, no transcriptions of solos, no equipment for sampling or slowing down some virtuoso's playing, no video lessons showing where to put your fingers, not all that much music available to learn from (maybe you knew someone who owned a copy of Wheels of Fire or East-West, but that was pretty much it, with the exception of 15-second outbursts here and there in the middle of 2:30 radio songs), and beginner instruments typically had the sort of action that required a C-clamp to fret the string. We weren't fighting an uphill battle; we were trying to scale a kilometer-high cliff, that was Teflon-coated, and we were wearing mittens and billy-boots.
I'll take that one step further and say I learn off of 8 track. Talk about tying one of my hands behind my back. But it was my own fault, I wanted a format that I could use in a couple years, when I was old enough to drive and bought a car.

On the positive side, I think that 8 track developed my ear. I'm a pretty fast learner now, because I had to be back then. Still, I wonder how good I could have been if I had Youtube at 13.
 

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Do you mean "8-Tack" in the sense of cartridges prone to switching channels in the middle of solos, or did you mean an 8-track recording deck (e.g., 1/2" tape)
 

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His playing is very good but I was more impressed with his voice. He sure did not sound like any 12 year old and he sang with feeling. He obviously has something in his DNA that I am missing.
 
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I remember a kid some time back in the 90's, Nathan Cavaleri, who ended up jamming with the Allmans and touring with BB King by the time he was 14 or so. His chops came from woodshedding when he was a pre-teen and battling leukemia while stuck at home. Trust me, you don't want his DNA.
 

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I like seeing this but I disagree with the soul and feeling statement. Chances are his dad bought him some records and gear and pushed him into it, at best he's going through the motions and worst case he hates it but doesn't want to disappoint. It's no different than sports. I don't think it'll be the Joe B story, maybe a Lang or Sheppard but probably not.
Years ago we, as kids, auditioned people for a guitar position in the band and this one kid showed up who looked very out of place. It looked like he didn't even want to be there. His dad came along and set up his gear. The kid picks up the guitar and runs through a bunch of Stevie Ray licks perfectly but so soulless it was sad. His dad approached us and campaigned to have him join even though the kid looked like he wanted nothing to do with the band. I felt a little odd about the whole thing.
 

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guitar tab is great stuff. Without it there would be nothing.
I don't think there would nothing, but it's pretty clear that the widespread availability of tablature - particularly that tablature that transcribes the work of virtuosos, such that it can be approached, if gingerly, by novices - puts people years ahead of where they would be without it. I'm saying this as a guy who learned when all you had was AM radio, a Mel Bay chord book, the odd "big fake book" (which was chords, and rarely solos) and maybe a couple of lessons from someone who had been playing a year or two more than you. No internet. No video. No MP3s. No loopers. No transcriptions. And access to pop music maybe 1hr a day, and an extra 7 minutes on Ed Sullivan.
 

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In the early days I remember playing an LP at 16 to try and copy a lick. Years later I had a Boss ME30 that could do half speed without key change for up to 16 seconds of a cd.

Yesterday I watched 3 different Youtube videos and printed the tab for the solo for Another Brick. Within 40 minutes I pretty much had it down.

Finally I am a 61 year-old prodigy!
 

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My point exactly.

I think we should give credit to kids who could be doing something entirely different, but decide to apply themselves to guitar in a very committed way. But I think we should also acknowledge that they are standing on the shoulders of a LOT of supports.
 

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In the early days I remember playing an LP at 16 to try and copy a lick. Years later I had a Boss ME30 that could do half speed without key change for up to 16 seconds of a cd.

Yesterday I watched 3 different Youtube videos and printed the tab for the solo for Another Brick. Within 40 minutes I pretty much had it down.

Finally I am a 61 year-old prodigy!
You young farts youtube, tabs, videos etc, when I started guitar I had to take lessons from an old fart like me and it weren't easy, like today with youtube and books loaded with tabs, incorrect as they may be, still a big improvement over 1/2 hr. lesson from someone who would rather be fishing or golfing.
:)
 

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You young farts youtube, tabs, videos etc, when I started guitar I had to take lessons from an old fart like me and it weren't easy, like today with youtube and books loaded with tabs, incorrect as they may be, still a big improvement over 1/2 hr. lesson from someone who would rather be fishing or golfing.
:)
So nice to be called a "young fart" these days. Thank you - you old codger! ;)
 

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I don't know how those kids do it. I had the Internet resources to learn from, but I didn't have the aptitude to put it to work.

It wasn't until I was in my early 20s that I feel I became capable of learning to really play. I picked up the guitar again after nearly a decade and it suddenly made sense. The notes, scales, feel, and everything just clicked.
 
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