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2 months of pain and maybe 2 months more. A couple of months ago we needed to move our bed (which weighs a half ton) and as soon as I lifted it I heard a pop in my left wrist. Finally ended up going to the doctor a few days ago becuase it does not seem to be getting any better. Tells me it's a non-surgical type thing and it will heal. Question is when? Barre chords are basically impossible.

Tenosynovitis is the inflammation of the fluid-filled sheath (called the synovium) that surrounds a tendon. Symptoms of tenosynovitis include pain, swelling and difficulty moving the particular joint where the inflammation occurs.
 

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2 months of pain and maybe 2 months more. A couple of months ago we needed to move our bed (which weighs a half ton) and as soon as I lifted it I heard a pop in my left wrist. Finally ended up going to the doctor a few days ago becuase it does not seem to be getting any better. Tells me it's a non-surgical type thing and it will heal. Question is when? Barre chords are basically impossible.

Tenosynovitis is the inflammation of the fluid-filled sheath (called the synovium) that surrounds a tendon. Symptoms of tenosynovitis include pain, swelling and difficulty moving the particular joint where the inflammation occurs.
Is the pain in the thumb. If it is, it sounds like something I was dealing with a couple of years ago. Three physio appointments and a few months later and I'm OK. I knew someone that's been dealing with the same thing for a over a year so I asked the therapist why I healed rather quickly and their still dealing with the pain. Her answer, "because you did the exercises I gave you" so keep that in mind.
 

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2 months of pain and maybe 2 months more. A couple of months ago we needed to move our bed (which weighs a half ton) and as soon as I lifted it I heard a pop in my left wrist. Finally ended up going to the doctor a few days ago becuase it does not seem to be getting any better. Tells me it's a non-surgical type thing and it will heal. Question is when? Barre chords are basically impossible.

Tenosynovitis is the inflammation of the fluid-filled sheath (called the synovium) that surrounds a tendon. Symptoms of tenosynovitis include pain, swelling and difficulty moving the particular joint where the inflammation occurs.
I had some issues with my left forearm and had a pinched ulnar nerve that caused numbness in the fingers (pinky and ring). The ulnar nerve is common for "old folks" - i tried many remedies including; chiropractic, neurologist, acupuncture, RMT - The biggest improvement was with the Osteopath and RMT second. I still have a bit of numbness in my pinky and it varies day to day depending on other factors like fatigue. A friend suggested the Osteopath and it might be worth checking into it. cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No pain at all in the thumb. It's right in the wrist joint. Apparently there is a tendon that runs down your arm and connects to the joint. I can move it up and down without issue, it's side to side or twisting that hurts
 

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As a retired physio assistant i can tell you that these things take time to heal. I have had many problems with joints and tendons. Take your time and be patient. Highly recommend physio, acupuncture and other altenative treatments as it will help stimulate the blood flow around the affected area.Your body will heal itself slowly, no miracles just time. Best of luck.
 

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He gave me a script for cortisone shots if I want them, will hold out on that for a bit. He say's rest it and ice it nightly. I am fine with that but how long is this going to drag out?
Yeah, stay away from cortisone as long as possible as it is a short term remedy.Ice it a lot as it helps with the swelling. Rest it is also recommended. Depending on how severe the damage is, it will take at least another couple months.Every time i injured myself, it was about a 2-3 month layoff. If you dont rest it, it will take more time. Pretty much it my friend.
 

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One of the annoying problems with some kinds of joints is that it is hard to NOT use them. Staying off one's feet is easy. No heavy lifting is easy. Not using one's hands or wrists is much much harder. As a result, it becomes difficult for any inflammation to subside, because the damn joint never gets much rest.

I know it's not the same thing, but whenever I start to get the sort of inflammation in my mouse hand from too much clicking, I whip up a restraint for the afflicted fingers from masking tape or whatever is handy, so that I can't use that joint, even if I wanted to. It's tantamount to taking the joint's phone away from it and sending the joint on a tropical vacation where it can't even hear the news on the radio, let alone think about work.

I don't know how feasible that is for the afflicted area, but I do know that much of what prevents inflammation from subsiding is the near-reflexive unconscious use we make of those joints. Which is why sometimes you have to use artificial means to restrain them and give them a fighting chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One of the annoying problems with some kinds of joints is that it is hard to NOT use them. Staying off one's feet is easy. No heavy lifting is easy. Not using one's hands or wrists is much much harder. As a result, it becomes difficult for any inflammation to subside, because the damn joint never gets much rest.

I know it's not the same thing, but whenever I start to get the sort of inflammation in my mouse hand from too much clicking, I whip up a restraint for the afflicted fingers from masking tape or whatever is handy, so that I can't use that joint, even if I wanted to. It's tantamount to taking the joint's phone away from it and sending the joint on a tropical vacation where it can't even hear the news on the radio, let alone think about work.

I don't know how feasible that is for the afflicted area, but I do know that much of what prevents inflammation from subsiding is the near-reflexive unconscious use we make of those joints. Which is why sometimes you have to use artificial means to restrain them and give them a fighting chance.
I have a wrist brace, not super rigid but does restrict movement. I was not wearing it but the doc did say wrapping etc during the day would help, ice at night. So I am going to start wearing the brace and icing, see whaat happens.
 

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... Her answer, "because you did the exercises I gave you" so keep that in mind.
Your therapist certainly doesn't have any confidence issues!!...LOL
In all fairness, as a retired physio, I likely used the same line at some point...it is a classic.

I am drawn to these threads after so many years in the profession.

@GuitarsCanada I would suggest going back to your doctor to discuss receiving some form of active intervention. You don't really need his/her referral (unless he/she wants you to be seen by a another physician who is a specialist) but I feel it is important that your doctor knows what is happening and is part of the treatment "team". This is not only out of respect but to help ensure good communication and to maintain the patient <> doctor relationship you have developed. In addition, duplication of some treatment modalities is not wise. Others here will disagree.

Please keep us updated. Best wishes to get through this and back to playing the guitar as soon as it is reasonably possible.

@marcos I am in Ottawa on occasion. We should meet (seriously) and talk about working in the profession (at least for a few minutes)....and then about music, guitar, gear, etc for the next few hours...LOL.

EDIT: I type so slowly that there were several postings while I was tapping away.

@mhammer ..You are so skilled with words!!
I wish that you had written many of the texts that I had to study!
 

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Just living through my first bout of Gout - thought I had a mild sprain last Friday but woke in the middle of the night with the most incredible intense pain in my foot. Saw the doc and got some prednesone (only option with one kidney) and am just starting to be able to move without limping and hobbling a week later.

Joints! Arggggh! It's amazing how they can take you down :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just living through my first bout of Gout - thought I had a mild sprain last Friday but woke in the middle of the night with the most incredible intense pain in my foot. Saw the doc and got some prednesone (only option with one kidney) and am just starting to be able to move without limping and hobbling a week later.

Joints! Arggggh! It's amazing how they can take you down :(
Had a bout with the gout several years back, it hurts......
 

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A lot of different opinions here. The problem with my thumb was inflammation of the sheath in the wrist area that surrounds the tendon that goes to my thumb so it does sound similar. Some say rest yet I was given exercise. I've always been told that cortisone is the final treatment if all else fails yet Scott already has a prescription. When I first became aware of the problem, I was sent for x-rays and was then given a prescription for physio. I couldn't play my guitar for a few months due to the pain.

As for gout, I had that many years ago and have been taking allopurinol ever since with no re-occurance and yes, it does hurt like hell.
 

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A few years ago I was squatting down to pick something up, and I lost my balance and ended up having my hand hit the floor in a punching motion. I didn't think anything of it at the time, but as the day went on it really started to hurt. It got to the point where even using a computer mouse was causing a lot of pain. I tried to just ignore it, but after a few weeks of pain I really started to think I had done something, so I ended up going to the doctor. He sent me for x-rays to make sure I didn't have a small fracture, but said that I most likely would just have to wait it out. No factures, and it got better shortly after. I think it took about a month or so to stop hurting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A lot of different opinions here. The problem with my thumb was inflammation of the sheath in the wrist area that surrounds the tendon that goes to my thumb so it does sound similar. Some say rest yet I was given exercise. I've always been told that cortisone is the final treatment if all else fails yet Scott already has a prescription. When I first became aware of the problem, I was sent for x-rays and was then given a prescription for physio and I can tell you I couldn't play my guitar for a few months due to the pain.
Interesting. My Doc says aggravation (use) will only prolong the recovery. Suggests wrapping during the day, keep it still, then ice every night. He gave me the script as a personal option only. Said if I feel I need it, which at this point I don't. I thought for sure I would be sent for X-Ray but after I explained to him what I did and the symptoms and after he did an exam he quickly indicated what it was.
 

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Interesting. My Doc says aggravation (use) will only prolong the recovery. Suggests wrapping during the day, keep it still, then ice every night. He gave me the script as a personal option only. Said if I feel I need it, which at this point I don't. I thought for sure I would be sent for X-Ray but after I explained to him what I did and the symptoms and after he did an exam he quickly indicated what it was.
Perhaps he has x-ray vision. (Sorry, I couldn't resist)
I don't remember the actual time I hurt my thumb but I'm thinking it was when I was rolling 800 lb bales of hay around as part of my farming activities. You did say you felt a pop so that may be the difference between our injuries.
 

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Not wanting to rain on the parade of this thread. We all want to be helpful.

However, (here it comes) I just want to let you folks know that you are beginning to compare apples to avocados to mushrooms with regards to virtually (if not) all of these pathological conditions.

The anatomy of the forearm, wrist and hand is extremely complex. Hence, the resulting sequelae of injuries/pathology and the associated treatment(s) varies
exponentially.
 

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Not wanting to rain on the parade of this thread. We all want to be helpful.

However, (here it comes) I just want to let you folks know that you are beginning to compare apples to avocados to mushrooms with regards to virtually (if not) all of these pathological conditions.

The anatomy of the forearm, wrist and hand is extremely complex. Hence, the resulting sequelae of injuries/pathology and the associated treatment(s) varies
exponentially.
Good point. Now I have to go get my dictionary so I can look up "sequelae of injuries":)
 
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