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I've been working really hard on my guitar playing for a few years now and now that I'm finally seeing results I get a flare up of tennis elbow in my left (fretting hand) side.
Doesn't hurt much while playing but lifting a certain way hurts quite a bit and after a night of playing I'm rather sore in the morning.
Has any of you dealt with this? What did you do? How well did it work? Giving up playing is not an option!
 

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Last year I was working hard to learn a solo with lots of bends and it resulted in the same thing as you're experiencing. I've had bouts of tendonitis before and tried all the snakeoil treatments but nothing seemed to work as well as just laying off it for a while. It doesn't mean you have to quit playing but you do have to be aware that the harder you work it, the longer it will take to heal.
On the other hand, I work with a 65 year old cowboy (active team roper) who had tendonitis so bad he couldn't hold a rope any longer (or a cup of coffee for that matter). He was recommended to a sports physio guy who did IMS (intermuscular stimulation). I won't bore you with the details of the procedure since you can google it at will, but I will offer testimony that in his case it absolutely worked after 4 treatments. This was 3 years ago and he continues to rope with no further issues. He told me at the time it was one of the most painful things he's ever experienced (and he's broken a lot of bones). His physiotherapist warned him "You're gonna hate me...". Apparently with this procedure, the pain indicates that it is working. No pain, no success.
 

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I was also going to recommend talking to Dave (the other one). When I suffered through a bad episode of tennis elbow years ago (brought on by playing tennis) I did all of the research on it that I could at the time. Ended up finding a blurb from the Australian Tennis Association about it. Bottom line was to play through the pain but immediately engage in some physio. I believe the focus was on the forearm muscle but again, wait to hear from Dave. Worked like a charm for me, although it hurt like a bugger for a couple of months. :)
 
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My strumming hand's wrist has been acting up for a couple of years.
It's why I can't use a pick on bass.
I also have a little nerve damage from childhood that sometimes
I need both hands to drink my coffee to avoid spillage.
And arthritic fingers in my left hand which makes playing cowboy chords a little painful.

As we get older, our bodies remind us of our old war wounds. lol.
 

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ive had it, but not related to guitar...had to do with some yard work and other outdoor projects I was doing.
theres prob lots to read about playing with your guitar hand in a relaxed position, and learning to relax while you play, not strangling the neck of your git. Taking breaks prob helps too.
 

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I had it years ago and the chiropractor fixed it in less than two weeks. There is a type of acupuncture done on the ear lobe that he used in addition to standard treatment.
 

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I had it in my strumming picking hand several years back--hurt to play--so I played as little as possible (I was teaching guitar at the time--some students knew how to tune their guitars well--others got extra practice at it in lessons--others I just dealt with it...)
I find often the tendonitis hurts whether you use the body part affected--but overuse makes it take longer to heal.
I avoid lifting heavy objects, rest & sometimes chiropractic help...
(I have had tendonitis in the elbow only once--but several times in one or both knees)
It was worse when I had frozen shoulder.
I could only play my 12 strung if I stood with the guitar on a strap and angled almost perpendicular to my body.
Otherwise I couldn't put my arm over the guitar body.
 

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I am finally responding to this. I have been busy and procrastinated as it is difficult for me to write. @Hamstrung is one of my closest friends ad we have talked about his 'Tennis Elbow' very briefly.

This is the situation. I qualified as a physiotherapist not all that long after the elbow was invented. The majority of my career was in paediatrics and I spent the last 9 years before retiring working in my wife's private psychology practice as the office manager. See where I'm going with this? A few years ago I decided not to comment on specific treatment concepts, etc with others. With every day that goes by, my memory of the details of anatomy, physiology and pathology is diminishing exponentially.

The film @335Bob posted is excellent. The approaches to treatment that have been mentioned (e.g., dry needling (IMS), acupuncture, bracing, etc.) are all used to varying extents.

I will end by throwing a clinical question back to those who have been treated for this condition in the recent past...
Did anyone receive ultrasound and was it helpful?

Thanks for you understanding. I was in the medical/helping profession(s) all of my working life and it is very upsetting not feeling comfortable and confident with trying to help others in this manner.
 

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Did anyone receive ultrasound and was it helpful?

Thanks for you understanding. I was in the medical/helping profession(s) all of my working life and it is very upsetting not feeling comfortable and confident with trying to help others in this manner.
I didn't receive ultrasound for my tennis elbow but I did when I pulled the ligaments in my foot and it helped and also when I sprained my MCL. It tends to speed up the healing process is what I was told.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
A wealth of information here! Thanks guys!
I'm trying the stretches shown in the video. Hopefully I'll get a handle on this soon.
 
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