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Discussion Starter #1
I've been asked by a few people recently if I give bass lessons.. which I don't. But then I got thinking.. why not? It would be a good way to make some money on the side. Are there any teachers here who could give me a few pointers... Like obviously reading music is a huge thing for bass, so I think that would be important to teach, and theory, and scales, and all that jazz..
But like... how do you get more students? Just put ads out? I'd rather not work for a music store, cuz I could make almost twice the money working independantly, if I can get students.

:food-smiley-004:
 

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As long as:

- you understand technical equality... meaning there's more than one way you can do something and they're all equally acceptable. I know a few people who have taken lessons and they say, for instance, putting your pinky on the pickguard while picking is wrong. That's when they laugh at the teacher, mention Petrucci and MAB, then leave the lesson.

- know your theory pretty well

- most importantly, have the time!

Post up on Kijiji / Craiglist, classified ads in the newspaper, maybe get yourself a website up (with soundclips... if you can rip on guitar and manage to amaze them, they might want to come to you), print out some posters and hang 'em up on bulletin boards all over the place (ie: restaraunts, a bunch 'round here have them... people stick business cards and what not on them), etc.

All that said, I've never had a teacher nor do I plan on it... I prefer learning from my mistakes, understanding why it was a mistake and how to correct it.
 

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I teach guitar/bass/mandolin from home full time and have for a few years.

Though it only works if you're good, nothing beats word-of-mouth for getting students, but you have to START more aggressively than that by getting the word out yourself locally. Ads in music stores, elementary schools, high schools, universities, colleges, church halls, libraries, gyms, grocery stores...anywhere that potential pickers or their parents go. Don't overlook cool cafes and rock oriented clothing stores and the like. Newspaper ads are expensive if you want graphic visibility so save your receipts for tax time. Ask to put an insert in school newsletters. Speak with other local instructors to see if they can off-load some of their waiting list. Be visible and vocal about your service at gigs, jams, sessions, etc. Put your professional looking business card in people's hands. Once you have a small core number of students, word-of-mouth should sustain your business. I do not advertise, at least I haven't done more than a poster in the local mom'n'pop music shop for years. Word-of-mouth does it all...I haven't had fewer than 50 students for a few years.

Know your theory, have firm lesson plans, read and teach reading, don't go slack on technique, have a good space, lighting, equipment, be punctual.

One pet peeve of mine are teachers who start up their business for occassional pocket coin rather than long term investment in learning continuity for dedicated students. This can be a huge disappointment for students who are dumped just because the teacher has changed his mind, found other work, or is too lazy to do the work involved in the job. Sure, it creates more job security for me, but there are lots of folks who just don't get lessons when they need or want them most...if at all.

I'd be happy to answer specific questions about payment, scheduling, books and whatever else if you're interested.

Peace, Mooh.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I teach guitar/bass/mandolin from home full time and have for a few years.

Though it only works if you're good, nothing beats word-of-mouth for getting students, but you have to START more aggressively than that by getting the word out yourself locally. Ads in music stores, elementary schools, high schools, universities, colleges, church halls, libraries, gyms, grocery stores...anywhere that potential pickers or their parents go. Don't overlook cool cafes and rock oriented clothing stores and the like. Newspaper ads are expensive if you want graphic visibility so save your receipts for tax time. Ask to put an insert in school newsletters. Speak with other local instructors to see if they can off-load some of their waiting list. Be visible and vocal about your service at gigs, jams, sessions, etc. Put your professional looking business card in people's hands. Once you have a small core number of students, word-of-mouth should sustain your business. I do not advertise, at least I haven't done more than a poster in the local mom'n'pop music shop for years. Word-of-mouth does it all...I haven't had fewer than 50 students for a few years.

Know your theory, have firm lesson plans, read and teach reading, don't go slack on technique, have a good space, lighting, equipment, be punctual.

One pet peeve of mine are teachers who start up their business for occassional pocket coin rather than long term investment in learning continuity for dedicated students. This can be a huge disappointment for students who are dumped just because the teacher has changed his mind, found other work, or is too lazy to do the work involved in the job. Sure, it creates more job security for me, but there are lots of folks who just don't get lessons when they need or want them most...if at all.

I'd be happy to answer specific questions about payment, scheduling, books and whatever else if you're interested.

Peace, Mooh.
Alright, thanks.. If I have any more questions I'll PM you. I don't want to go fulltime with this, because I'm going to school in the fall and won't have time for full-time teaching. But like evenings a couple times a week would be good...
 

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I would think that teaching part-time would be a great way of supplimenting your income, especially if you're a student. Flexible hours, knowledge of what's current with student tastes, and probably enough income to buy your groceries!

Good luck!

Peace, Mooh.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well yeah, sure beats working fast food for $8/hr.
 

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I only make 7 at tim hortons...

If you have any siblings/cousins, tell them. Someone might mention it and they'll know who to recommend. network! network!
 
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