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Okey, so i have a question for all of you. What the hell does: Takes pedals very well mean?
I see this a lot and have no idea what it means. Much appreciated and be gentle with me. LOL
 

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Personally I've found some drive pedals, for example, work nicely with certain amps but not with others. I'm not sure why. However, I take that to mean that an amp works well with a variety of pedals.
 

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I had a Vox AC15C2 that did not sound good with most drive pedals. Didn't really bother me because it was pretty sweet on it's own. When you get an amp that doesn't work well with pedals you will understand exactly what "works well with pedals" means.
 

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I find that I prefer to put my dirt through the gain channel. Only a few sound good through the clean channel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had a Vox AC15C2 that did not sound good with most drive pedals. Didn't really bother me because it was pretty sweet on it's own. When you get an amp that doesn't work well with pedals you will understand exactly what "works well with pedals" means.
So its mostly with gain pedals correct? I have always thought that if i dont get the desired sound out of a certain pedal that i should change said pedal and not the amp. Right now i am using a 77 Champ with a Barber Gain Changer and when i crank it, it really sings. Wouldnt playing humbuckers also give me a better performance from my amp with some drive?
 

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I always take it to mean that it won't get muddy or suddenly change the base tone just because there's pedals in front.

JCM800's take pedals well, as do JMP's.
 

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So its mostly with gain pedals correct? I have always thought that if i dont get the desired sound out of a certain pedal that i should change said pedal and not the amp. Right now i am using a 77 Champ with a Barber Gain Changer and when i crank it, it really sings. Wouldnt playing humbuckers also give me a better performance from my amp with some drive?
Some amps just get shitty and fizzy. drris in the reverb trem channel for instance I think sound terrible.
 

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Just some personal experience i had on Saturday night on a outside gig. Started with a Strat with Klein Jazzy Cat pickups and was not feeling i had the right sound so at the second set i switched over to my Tele with JS Moore pickups. What a difference in sound. Its like my amp came to life. Same set-up, same amount of gain. The weekend before had another Strat with Vineham 69's and it was really dialed in. One of the best sounds from my little Champ ever.
 

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So its mostly with gain pedals correct? I have always thought that if i dont get the desired sound out of a certain pedal that i should change said pedal and not the amp. Right now i am using a 77 Champ with a Barber Gain Changer and when i crank it, it really sings. Wouldnt playing humbuckers also give me a better performance from my amp with some drive?
I don’t use a lot of pedals. I rarely take a pedal board with me. At gig level volumes I like the sound of an overdriven tube amp. I live in a duplex so an overdriven tube amp is way too loud, especially the AC15 which is really loud at breakup. At home I use a mild boost or overdrive to simulate my live sound. With the Vox I could not get anywhere near my live sound with any pedals I tried. It was just a fizzy, shrill mess. If you were at gig levels the pedals were fine. It was just at home practice levels.
 

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Amps with built in effects can and do often react differently to various pedals. A solid transparent foundation (amp) works well with pedals in my opinion.
For example a dirty tweed fender type amp needs no dirt or reverb to sound great. It seems to sound best all by itself. They can be picky with pedals.

A Blackface or Silverface Bassman or Bandmaster for example, in my opinion is a solid clean full sounding amp that works very well with most any pedals. They aren’t picky and deliver the goods. These amps I would say work well with pedals.
 

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A lot of open, or no feedback, loop amps (ac15-30 - Tweed Deluxes) often don’t take pedals well. Usually the harmonic content is full with an open loop: floppy, full bass and a cool energized mid and top. There’s no room for pedals to do their thing.
It’s not always the case of course.
I also find a super loud clean tube tone sometimes don’t jive with pedals.
My favourite tube platform is a closed loop slightly driven sound.
 

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I found it interesting that Charles added a section here on his web site specifically for Pedal Platform Amps: Pedal Platform Amps | Guitar Amplifiers | Electric Mojo Guitars

He writes: Pedal-platform amps refer to amplifiers with lots of clean headroom: allowing you to get the most our of your effects. Pedal-platform amps offer a clean canvas which can be pushed and colored with pedals.

I have the good fortune right now of playing through a 100 watt Port City called the Pearl. It's built to be a pedal platform amp. Man, it's like playing in hi-fidelity. You can hear what your pedals are *supposed* to sound like... along with my barely-passable-guitar-playing.
 

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Give me something with 50+ watts and a full-bodied clean voice. Saying it "takes pedals well" is in the same category as "it gets pretty loud."

No shit.

Headroom and balanced eq. My 100 watt Royal Atlantic has a 2nd lease on life as a "pedal platform" because of those two things. It's spectacular.
 

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Give me something with 50+ watts and a full-bodied clean voice. Saying it "takes pedals well" is in the same category as "it gets pretty loud."

No shit.

Headroom and balanced eq. My 100 watt Royal Atlantic has a 2nd lease on life as a "pedal platform" because of those two things. It's spectacular.
I agree. That's usually what I think of when I hear 'takes pedals well'. A loud, clean platform that lets you hear the pedal without much interference or influence from the amp (all amps have a voice, so some influence is inevitable).

The only caveat to that for me is if you like a smaller amp near clipping with a pedal boosting the front end to get it the rest of the way there. Large amps don't work so well in that regard. I mean, unless you get to play bloody loud, which most of us sadly don't (at least in practice/gig scenarios).
 

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I agree. That's usually what I think of when I hear 'takes pedals well'. A loud, clean platform that lets you hear the pedal without much interference or influence from the amp (all amps have a voice, so some influence is inevitable).

The only caveat to that for me is if you like a smaller amp near clipping with a pedal boosting the front end to get it the rest of the way there. Large amps don't work so well in that regard. I mean, unless you get to play bloody loud, which most of us sadly don't (at least in practice/gig scenarios).
100%. There's some notable exceptions to the headroom idea.
 

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I've seen quite a few reviews where it's clear that the reviewer is not fond of the amp but uses the term 'great with pedals' as a way to throw in a positive comment.
In this case it's saying that although the amp doesn't really have a great (or inspiring) base tone, it's a good platform (essentially a power amp) for pedals.

As Budda said earlier, the JCM 800 and JMP family of amps excel with pedals.
In this case the amp has excellent base tone that can be an excellent foundation for pedals to compliment.

'Great with pedals' can be a compliment or condescending depending on the tone of context it is used in.
 
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