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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Right now on Vancouver Island, and elsewhere in BC, I am allowed to kill up to 25 yellow perch per day. Although I would much rather fish for native fish like this fish: My best fly caught and released freshwater rainbow but in a lake so far undisturbed by idiots.
Many fly fishermen here in BC are finding that all we are left with now is invasive species opportunities. For perch and bass.
Here is what is possible in the way of perch right now on Shawnigan Lake. These did deep fry properly after trimming and scaling with garden shears. I caught them about 4-5 years ago. Who knows how large they are now, some could be getting up to 10 inches, Shawnigan is that productive with the right insect populations of chironomid, may fly and at one time early season caddis fly.

These perch can currently be had in unlimited numbers if you are a catch and release fly fisherman. A simple little size 12-16 chironomid imitation or black and red micro leach guarantees continuous action without a let up almost all day in the shallows of Shawnigan Lake. Far better perch fishing than can be had anywhere else in Canada. You can clean up using a zero weight and not risk any chance of being spooled by other larger fish. They fight and jump like crazy on 2 lb fluorocarbon leader and tippet and if filmed with network fishing show methods can produce some real sport fishing action shots.

My question to those who like to eat these little morsels of aquatic proteins is. Is it possible to pickle them after offing the heads and cross spines? Has anyone ever come up with a way of softening the bones by smoking and pickling them? It seems that perhaps this is the only way they may become of any use at the table or in the basement man cave/sports bar.
 

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Those Perch look kinda small. If I can get back to my cabin in Ontario this year I will try to post a pic of Perch there. Large enough to fillet, but still not generally kept for the table. Maybe too many better fish. Not sure if there is a limit now. Some previously Perch lakes have been successfully re-stocked with other species like Walleye.

Also not much colour on that rainbow. What are you guys doing to your fish out there? Lol. Just kidding. Nice size! A beauty.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Those Perch look kinda small. If I can get back to my cabin in Ontario this year I will try to post a pic of Perch there.

Also not much colour on that rainbow. What are you guys doing to your fish out there? Lol. Just kidding. Nice size! A beauty.
Oh yah, the rainbow was eating mostly leach, traveller sedge and especially black and red gomphus, (dragonfly larvae). The lake it came out of is super productive and if no added trash fish like perch or bass is deliberately and ILLEGALLY planted there by morons it will continue to produce rainbows up to 20 lbs.

The rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in the original picture was of the Pennask Lake strains. Thus the almost steelhead looks and bright silver slab sides. Two jumps over 5 feet in the air, one cartwheel and 3 strong 40-50 yards of backing runs on a seven weight dry line with 8 lb tippet. It only took about 30 seconds to revive even after the short hero shot my brother took of me and the fish. Water temp was about 56 f that day so it was not starved for O2 the way they can be during summer fishing. Rain and mild winds and cold nights are wonderful, it can snow and freeze down to -5C in late June up at the altitudes we fish for these beauties.

My hands were wet and I protected the head from hitting the boat and carefully started to revive it within a few seconds of taking it out of the water.

It was too large for us too eat and we still had a good 5 days of fishing and no freezer so it went back to eat bugs and break other people's rods another day.

On some ponds we fish we regularly get spooled and have to point the rod to avoid losing fly lines. But then again I envy the great perch ice fishing masters of Ontariario this time of year. Incredible sport watching tipups all day or sitting in a shack with a beer waiting for a fish to slowly nibble on the maggot or worm or whatever piece of meat is on the end of hook.

My problem with ice fishing is I have one heck of a time getting a long enough chainsaw hole cut to open up enough water get in a decent cast this time of year where I fish.

Ice-off and chironomids most likely won't come till late April this year in the Kamloops region. In the Cariboo where the real fish are nothing much comes open for fly fishing until early May after cold long winters. But dreaming about days on the lake is much better than sitting around worrying about what is currently happening during this year flu season.

A few years back, on a really great little lake I took an unintentional bath. I didn't even bother pulling the ripcord on my pfd because it was an easy swim to Moose Poop Bay and the shore. The water was about 60f and I really needed a bath anyway. The problem was the battery in the boat was not tied down and it slide sideways when I leaned over in a skinny 10 ft jon boat. Didn't even lose any of my gear just a little of my pride. Lucky that it wasn't a cold spring day, then I would not have been quite so nonchalant about the incident. My brother was in the 14 footer and just rowed me to shore so I could dry off and feed the mosquitoes LOL

But enough about my fishin' exploits now to get back at studying up Villa Lobos preludes 1, 2 and 3 and dreaming about playing all three well with expression and commitment in front of real humans again.
 

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Oh yah, the rainbow was eating mostly leach, traveller sedge and especially black and red gomphus, (dragonfly larvae). The lake it came out of is super productive and if no added trash fish like perch or bass is deliberately and ILLEGALLY planted there by morons it will continue to produce rainbows up to 20 lbs.

The rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in the original picture was of the Pennask Lake strains. Thus the almost steelhead looks and bright silver slab sides. Two jumps over 5 feet in the air, one cartwheel and 3 strong 40-50 yards of backing runs on a seven weight dry line with 8 lb tippet. It only took about 30 seconds to revive even after the short hero shot my brother took of me and the fish. Water temp was about 56 f that day so it was not starved for O2 the way they can be during summer fishing. Rain and mild winds and cold nights are wonderful, it can snow and freeze down to -5C in late June up at the altitudes we fish for these beauties.

My hands were wet and I protected the head from hitting the boat and carefully started to revive it within a few seconds of taking it out of the water.

It was too large for us too eat and we still had a good 5 days of fishing and no freezer so it went back to eat bugs and break other people's rods another day.

On some ponds we fish we regularly get spooled and have to point the rod to avoid losing fly lines. But then again I envy the great perch ice fishing masters of Ontariario this time of year. Incredible sport watching tipups all day or sitting in a shack with a beer waiting for a fish to slowly nibble on the maggot or worm or whatever piece of meat is on the end of hook.

My problem with ice fishing is I have one heck of a time getting a long enough chainsaw hole cut to open up enough water get in a decent cast this time of year where I fish.

Ice-off and chironomids most likely won't come till late April this year in the Kamloops region. In the Cariboo where the real fish are nothing much comes open for fly fishing until early May after cold long winters. But dreaming about days on the lake is much better than sitting around worrying about what is currently happening during this year flu season.

A few years back, on a really great little lake I took an unintentional bath. I didn't even bother pulling the ripcord on my pfd because it was an easy swim to Moose Poop Bay and the shore. The water was about 60f and I really needed a bath anyway. The problem was the battery in the boat was not tied down and it slide sideways when I leaned over in a skinny 10 ft jon boat. Didn't even lose any of my gear just a little of my pride. Lucky that it wasn't a cold spring day, then I would not have been quite so nonchalant about the incident. My brother was in the 14 footer and just rowed me to shore so I could dry off and feed the mosquitoes LOL

But enough about my fishin' exploits now to get back at studying up Villa Lobos preludes 1, 2 and 3 and dreaming about playing all three well with expression and commitment in front of real humans again.
LOl, i can relate to your pic
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LOl, i can relate to your pic
Arfff!!! I am getting a little long in the tooth but not scrappin' for a war that cannot be won. Especially on issues of ecologically responsible sport fishing in British Columbia in some places where the environment has yet to be screwed over completely by imported fish species just yet.
Fortunately as a proud Orangutan I live where my cousins the Sasquatch are still to be found roaming in the forests and especially where fishermen tend to congregate. Here is the proof that my species is related to the British Columbian strains of Sasquatch
Science information on the net is amazing these days especially when it is confirmed on episodes of Ancient Aliens!
Who knows? soon the fishing shows coming from my neck of the woods might reflect the true wonders of what really goes on in the bush out here in the name of progress, The latest environmental abuse on Vancouver Island makes the Muskoka lakes look like a true Alaskan wilderness.
BTW Sasquatch do cry. :rolleyes:

Maybe I will return to my normal sane self after this madness with Covid 19 settles down but till then, I will try not to be seen. I am in the Sasquatch line and hate being photographed unless I have one of these little beauties to show off. This one only about 24 inches and around 6 lbs before being filleted. It smoked up wonderfully. And was caught outside Merit BC two years after the 30" plus one in the first picture in the thread. We don't do exact measurements but as you can plainly see the fish ain't all that bad considering we only fish with fly rods and barbless single hooks without exceptions.
 

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Oh yah, the rainbow was eating mostly leach, traveller sedge and especially black and red gomphus, (dragonfly larvae). The lake it came out of is super productive and if no added trash fish like perch or bass is deliberately and ILLEGALLY planted there by morons it will continue to produce rainbows up to 20 lbs.

The rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in the original picture was of the Pennask Lake strains. Thus the almost steelhead looks and bright silver slab sides. Two jumps over 5 feet in the air, one cartwheel and 3 strong 40-50 yards of backing runs on a seven weight dry line with 8 lb tippet. It only took about 30 seconds to revive even after the short hero shot my brother took of me and the fish. Water temp was about 56 f that day so it was not starved for O2 the way they can be during summer fishing. Rain and mild winds and cold nights are wonderful, it can snow and freeze down to -5C in late June up at the altitudes we fish for these beauties.

My hands were wet and I protected the head from hitting the boat and carefully started to revive it within a few seconds of taking it out of the water.

It was too large for us too eat and we still had a good 5 days of fishing and no freezer so it went back to eat bugs and break other people's rods another day.

On some ponds we fish we regularly get spooled and have to point the rod to avoid losing fly lines. But then again I envy the great perch ice fishing masters of Ontariario this time of year. Incredible sport watching tipups all day or sitting in a shack with a beer waiting for a fish to slowly nibble on the maggot or worm or whatever piece of meat is on the end of hook.

My problem with ice fishing is I have one heck of a time getting a long enough chainsaw hole cut to open up enough water get in a decent cast this time of year where I fish.

Ice-off and chironomids most likely won't come till late April this year in the Kamloops region. In the Cariboo where the real fish are nothing much comes open for fly fishing until early May after cold long winters. But dreaming about days on the lake is much better than sitting around worrying about what is currently happening during this year flu season.

A few years back, on a really great little lake I took an unintentional bath. I didn't even bother pulling the ripcord on my pfd because it was an easy swim to Moose Poop Bay and the shore. The water was about 60f and I really needed a bath anyway. The problem was the battery in the boat was not tied down and it slide sideways when I leaned over in a skinny 10 ft jon boat. Didn't even lose any of my gear just a little of my pride. Lucky that it wasn't a cold spring day, then I would not have been quite so nonchalant about the incident. My brother was in the 14 footer and just rowed me to shore so I could dry off and feed the mosquitoes LOL

But enough about my fishin' exploits now to get back at studying up Villa Lobos preludes 1, 2 and 3 and dreaming about playing all three well with expression and commitment in front of real humans again.
The real fish are in the Cariboo? I would argue that but things might have changed in the last bunch of years. Cariboo fishing is fine but can it be compare with working a fly, wet or dry on say the Skeena and getting a good sized Steelhead. It is a shame about Shawnigan tho. Used to be good fishing. That being said we have probably both fished the same waters and had luck with the same kinds of flies.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
The real fish are in the Cariboo? I would argue that but things might have changed in the last bunch of years. Cariboo fishing is fine but can it be compare with working a fly, wet or dry on say the Skeena and getting a good sized Steelhead. It is a shame about Shawnigan tho. Used to be good fishing. That being said we have probably both fished the same waters and had luck with the same kinds of flies.
Most likely downstream of Houston or down below Mauricetown or elsewhere on that river. Or wherever. We may very well have shaken hands or crossed lines at one time. I gave up on all those rivers a few years back because dodging jet boats with 4-5 people in them in a pontoon, drift boat or even wading up from the walk down to Humble Pie is no fun anymore and seeing dead hen fish in the slack waters that had bashed themselves to death on the rocks really got to me. Worse still the last time I hooked one it was almost dead from being hooked multiple times during the short fall season of "summer runs". I agree with this guy in a cage.
 

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In the mid 90's they were improving the road from the Puddle to Anahim Lake. The flagging crew I ran stayed at Tatla Lake and worked from Riske Creek to Anahim. There was always a fly rod or two in the truck and a 22 if we decided to stay at a jobsite and were tired of trout. The 6 of us were there for almost three months then over to Hundred Mile. BTW if you're going to end up hiding around Klemtu I might see you there. It probably hasn't changed much since the 70's.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In the mid 90's they were improving the road from the Puddle to Anahim Lake. The flagging crew I ran stayed at Tatla Lake and worked from Riske Creek to Anahim. There was always a fly rod or two in the truck and a 22 if we decided to stay at a jobsite and were tired of trout. The 6 of us were there for almost three months then over to Hundred Mile. BTW if you're going to end up hiding around Klemtu I might see you there. It probably hasn't changed much since the 70's.
I have always wanted to try some little lakes north of Anahim which were stocked with Dragon based dry fly friendly fish, most likely because the lakes are very insect productive. That is if the track in is passable depending on conditions and access restrictions. The pair may well be decent dry fly lakes or at least good wet fly. I am seriously thinking of doing freelance recording and setting down some original tracks for the good people at Nootka Sounds up Island now that I am finally semi retired. That is when and if the madness of today subsides. We were good friends with George Clutesi when I was a young pup and family regularly had him over for social visits and discussions about the truth about the ecology and peoples of the West Coast of this continent.
Tight lines
Eric
 

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Perch can be fun. I like the electric zap zap of them hitting. The taste pretty good too, and reproduce quickly.

Not as fun as rainbows though.
C
 
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I have always wanted to try some little lakes north of Anahim which were stocked with Dragon based dry fly friendly fish, most likely because the lakes are very insect productive. That is if the track in is passable depending on conditions and access restrictions. The pair may well be decent dry fly lakes or at least good wet fly. I am seriously thinking of doing freelance recording and setting down some original tracks for the good people at Nootka Sounds up Island now that I am finally semi retired. That is when and if the madness of today subsides. We were good friends with George Clutesi when I was a young pup and family regularly had him over for social visits and discussions about the truth about the ecology and peoples of the West Coast of this continent.
Tight lines
Eric
Years back, when I worked for the industrial friction place I had to go into Tahsis, Zeballos, Fair Harbour and other places from Tofino to Winter Harbour or Nanimo to Port Hardy, then up to the Charlottes. Drove in to some places, flew into some and boated into others.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Years back, when I worked for the industrial friction place I had to go into Tahsis, Zeballos, Fair Harbour and other places from Tofino to Winter Harbour or Nanimo to Port Hardy, then up to the Charlottes. Drove in to some places, flew into some and boated into others.
I was a flunky and second cook in the camp that put in the road and services to the copper mine across from Port Hardy back in 70 and hooked into a monster early March Steelhead on the Quatse only to have my butt kicked on the old Mitchell 300 bass reel that I was using. 10lb test and holy crap! batman, it almost had the drag smoking and was very close to my feet a few times before it got serious, looked at the kid from Ontario, smirked and ran down stream and just took every bit of the 120 yards I had on and one jump an pop it was gone. It was a fairly bright buck so it could not have been in the creek very long before being insulted by a once very good Bass fisher. Such was my intro to the best sport fish in Canada.

All that area of Vancouver Island is just log export land these days. Most of the really good stuff doesn't even get as far as the Fraser up to Mission log auction markets any more. They just boom them in coves and wait for the scheduled transfer tugs after international buyers chopper in and select the ones they want.

There still is some very limited decent fresh water catch and release only river fishing in that general area though, if you know all the new roads: That is if they are not locked up. We are losing all sport fishing access to a substantial portion of Canada in a big hurry. Depressing as hell but it is not politically correct to mention the truth about what is really happening here in BC. So enough said on that matter.


It took 5 years of trying to catch Steelhead from age 13-18 here in BC to actually understand that a thirty second fight with a Bass with a few jumps was a bit of a joke compared to a truly wild anadromous Steelhead.

The lakes with bass in them on Vancouver Island are a sad joke of a sport fishery and an ecological travesty. They are put here only to sell the eastern style garbage gear and give migrant eastern bass masters a place to dream about launching their now useless and very expensive 100hp bass boats one day.

Disclaimer:
These statements are only the personal opinion of a cousin of the sasquatch, and are not meant to offend the newly converted and radical exponents of Bass Fishing In BC. These statements are made only to warn them that if they ever do hook a real fish here in BC they might have to take the gear being peddled to them back to their dealership, even if it is from the new fangled mega sports and trinkets shop in Tsawwassen.

Second Disclaimer:
It is in the opinion of this creature that Twitter and short snipes about complicated issues and topics SUCKS! Even if it has become the fashion to TL,DR long posts on the internut.

Hope you can also wet a line soon. My casting arm is twitching and is beginning to effect my study of Villa Lobos!
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Are they considered invasive in your waters?

The perch, not the rats :).
C
The rats go back to the first sailing ships. The perch and bass are exclusives to the 20th and 21 first centuries.
Perch and Bass do incredible damage to the delicate balance of lakes that have a completely different ecology. The once abundant three spine stickleback that abundant native cutthroat trout predated upon in Vancouver Island lakes are mostly now extinct largely from over-predation by planted bass, now perch, Brown Trout, aggressive hybridized rainbows and the countless other mistakes made to erroneously "enhance" the once super abundant fish resources of most of the West Coast habitat.

We all screwed it up royally and I do not finger point on this issue. But those who were here saw the whole show and warned long ago about the unprecedented decline in habitat and numbers of once very abundant and harvest resilient fish of the species Oncorhynchus. I have witnessed and tried to document the decline as have many others who know the truth about what has happened and is still happening to the once unique and marvelously beautiful ecology of the west coast of Canada. As I stated Sasquatch do cry.
 

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^^ that is what happened in Lake Tahoe. Lahontain Cut Throat Trout was the native species, but overfished, and then invasive species. Was declared extinct.

Now they have been found again, unfortunately because they were "extinct", now they are the invasive species to the other trout that were introduced. No help is being given.

Crazy world.
C
 

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My dad (RIP) was born in Whiterock in 1942, and was a BC outdoorsman most of his life. Lots of great pics and stories, that echo some of the experiences, told of in here. Unfortunately my folks split when I was young and my brothers and I stayed with mom, so didn't get much education or experience. Living vicariously through your stories.
 
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