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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I arrived early this morning, and came into the big hall with the booths while most folks were at the breakfast session. That let me take a bunch of pictures of many booths without a bunch ofpeople standing in the way. I'll try and post later tonight.

Had a nice chat with James Trussart, and a lengthy chat with Christoph Kemper about the difficulties (and capabilities) of modelling distortion. Made the folks at the Bigsby booth smile big when I told them about meeting Ted McCarty. Just came from a session on "New Trends in the Guitar". One of the areas touched on by the panel was breaking the gender barrier. Another was the concept of "guitar in EDM".
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tried out a Grez Mendocino baritone guitar and had a long chat with the maker. I am now lusting for a chambered baritone. Jeez what a nice instrument. SOOOO resonant.

Valeton has a series of mini-pedals that look exactly like Boss, with the foot treadle and all, but roughly the same size as the mini-pedals everyone stuffs their pedalboards with these days. Apparently, Boss did not pursue trademark infringement, and gave their blessings.

The Wampler mini Faux Spring Reverb sounds decent.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Didn't have time last night, but here is this morning's treat.

The breakfast sesssion was a "best in show", where a panel of 7 dealers brought attention to things they thought deserved mention. When it came to "companies to watch", one of the panelists addressed what he felt was the elephant in the room: Gibson. He didn't dwell on the troubles, but emphasized that everyone wanted the company to thrive and continue, and would be watching to see that it did. The hall gave huge applause tothat. So, as they said in Monty Python and the Holy Grail: "not dead yet".
 

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Chambered guitars are fun. I believe a few of the reverens sig models are chambered.

Are you seeking out any other specific people or companies before its over?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've mostly been schmoozing with the pedal folks, a lot of whom seem to know of me. Just came back from the Korora booth ( Spira neat product, very usable effect with simple interface and lots of possibilities), and Walt looked at my name tag and broke out in a big smile and warm handshake. This is starting to get weird. When I used to teach, one year I had a class of 1100, most of whom took the class on cable TV. I had never met any of them, but every once in a while, I'd run into someone who would say "I think you were my psych prof"...like the guy at Rona 3 months ago when I was shopping for a garden shed. So apparently my web-presence has not gone unnoticed in the pedal community. It's validating to see such great products coming out of people who feel they learned something from me. And they're all such nice people. Great to be part of that community.

Right nw, I'm at the booth I'm working, which is sadly a little too close to the drumand cymbal area, where sveral John Bonham wannabes are making an ungodly racket. I don't mind drum solos. I'm just not a fan of long ones.
 

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I've mostly been schmoozing with the pedal folks, a lot of whom seem to know of me. Just came back from the Korora booth ( Spira neat product, very usable effect with simple interface and lots of possibilities), and Walt looked at my name tag and broke out in a big smile and warm handshake. This is starting to get weird. When I used to teach, one year I had a class of 1100, most of whom took the class on cable TV. I had never met any of them, but every once in a while, I'd run into someone who would say "I think you were my psych prof"...like the guy at Rona 3 months ago when I was shopping for a garden shed. So apparently my web-presence has not gone unnoticed in the pedal community. It's validating to see such great products coming out of people who feel they learned something from me. And they're all such nice people. Great to be part of that community.

Right nw, I'm at the booth I'm working, which is sadly a little too close to the drumand cymbal area, where sveral John Bonham wannabes are making an ungodly racket. I don't mind drum solos. I'm just not a fan of long ones.
Too modest. You're a giant in that industry, as a groundbreaking experimenter, a disseminator (sp?) of knowledge, a mentor, a huge contributer and enabler of the DIY community, and much more.

Mike looking spiffy as per usual.
 

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Another was the concept of "guitar in EDM".
What's the problem? I think there's some fine guitar players in Edmonton. I know a few myself (not to mention amp guys like Chuck.....).

Perhaps @keto and @Dorian2 may want to weigh in here.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Too modest. You're a giant in that industry, as a groundbreaking experimenter, a disseminator (sp?) of knowledge, a mentor, a huge contributer and enabler of the DIY community, and much more.

Mike looking spiffy as per usual.
That's very kind of you to say. A littl embarassing, but very kind. Robert Keeley was introducing me around as "a legend". Jeez. I'm gonna start driving through red lights screaming "I'm Mark fricking Hammer, baby!!". My head won't be able to fit into a hat anymore. Actually, I just came from a session that Craig Anderton gave. He was every bit as nice, and an excellent in situ teacher, as I had hoped he would be. Met every idealized expectation. Now THAT guy is a legend, and was my "internet" from about 1976 on, until the web came into being. I'm just passing on what I learned from him. He was talking about the music store of the future and how they might include studios for rental. I mentioned that the new Halifax library actually had public-access recording studios, and he was suitably impressed. It seems Halifax has one up on the SF Bay area. Who would have thought.
 

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Mark, we are all very lucky to have you and your thoughtful sharing of knowledge and experience. I think the fact that the pedal community at NAMM recognizes you as a teacher and experimenter speaks volumes to what you offer the music community - even if a bunch of them don't even know it. I know I appreciate learning from you and your detailed descriptions of products or experiences.

If you see Rob Keeley again before you go, thank him for building the Caverns for me :p.
 

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"I'm Mark fricking Hammer, baby!!"
You earned all of this fame/respect/honour through a lot of hard work,
devotion,
time spent helping others,
building...troubleshooting....rebuilding...rinse and repeat,
and the numerous detailed/lengthy tutorials that I keep trying to convince you to assemble into a (small) book

We are all proud to know Mark fricking Hammer.
Some of us have even had the privilege of meeting Mark fricking Hammer.

OUR CONGRATULATIONS to SIR Mark fricking Hammer, baby!!
 

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I was certainly excited to meet you even though we did spend quite a bit of time looking at tools in Lee Valley :) One thing many forum members might not know is Mark can cook a pretty mean spring roll. He is Mark multi fricking talented Hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks, but enough with the compliments, already.

Today was anyone-can-attend day, so the aisles were chock full of even more people who wanted to grab a custom Strat clone and wank away through a high-gain pedal. Imagine Saturday at L&M and multiply by at least 50. I attended a panel discussion on the future of the guitar at the end of the day, and even with the show-supplied wireless headphones I could barely make out what the discussants were saying. Outgoing GP editor Michael Molenda was supposed to moderate that session, but was a no-show, so I left early. But not before learning that Chris Kemper is actually a keyboard player and initially developed the Access Virus keyboard before moving on to the Profiler.

I did go to pass on Justin/Budda's compliments to Robert Keeley, but by that point he had left the show. You should send him an e-mail and tell him I told you to.

Had a real long chat with Stan Savage, the guy behind this innovative product: TruV Volume Tremolo It turns your whammy bar into a volume pedal, while still maintaining pitch-bending capabilities. A smart piece of engineering.

Dropped into Carter' Vintage Guitars after the show was over and folks were packed up. Took this pic that I thought you'd get a kick out of.

Lots more pics to follow once I get back home.
 

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Carter vintage guitars is the only store we stopped at in nashville last year. The owner of mythos pedals works there, nice guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What is Broadway in Nashville like on a Saturday night? One particular block, between 5th and 4th Ave, is essentially wall-to-wall clubs/honky-tonks, many of which get their mention in the TV show Nashville. But even if one is an inveterate watcher of the show, it doesn't give any sense of just how packed in all that entertainment is. So here is an example. What you see here are two drummers in two different bands, on two different stages, in two different clubs, side-by-each.

And here is one side of that block. On the left is Tootsie's Orchid Lounge, with Layla's just down the block and Roberts' Western World next to Layla's. Keep in mind that all these clubs will not only have a stage by the front window, but another in the rear and/or upstairs, all with bands working away and a packed house. This was taken around 5:00PM. It gets wilder as the evening goes on. And I'm only looking at ONE side of the street on ONE block. The next block down continues the theme.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Okay, gear. I'll try and show the more interesting things. At least interesting to me. I'll begin with the Guild line of electrics, and the reissuing of many of the classics: Starfire, Bluesbird, Thunderbird. I was disappointed to see that they elected NOT to include the built-in guitar stand in the solid bodies that was included in the originals, 50 years back.


Next up, the "wall of D'Angelicos". Long considered merely a name for collectors, they have come back with a vengeance, a reasonable price tag, and a pretty extensive line of models. The semi-acoustics, and the big jazz boxes play real nice. The "potato-shaped" solid-body I found uncomfortable. I imagine others have no problem with it, but I need a big rear bass bout to rest my picking forearm on, and that model lacks enough resting space. Believe it or not, I find the Gibson ES-339 uncomfortable to play for the same reason. I saw a lot of guitars from many companies with that colour of green. Though not the D'Angelicos, many companies were showing guitars with satin/matte finishes, and they look dead sexy.


Here's the gang from Premier Guitar, shooting their Day 1 review video, that they have posted. Given the din around them, and all the folks walking by, I'm amazed that a) you can hear them, and b) they aren't completely distracted by what's going on around them.
 
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