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Discussion Starter #1
Good day, I have a wonderful Tele style guitar built by Jeff Neville that needs shielding to reduce EMI buzz. (I've tested cables, switched amps, turned off lights, and concluded that it's definitely the guitar.)
I am going to acquire some copper foil tape to line the pickup and control cavities and wanted to know if anyone out there has had a positive (or negative) experience with this approach as a remedy.

Any and all feedback is welcome, thanks!
 

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I would not count on the shielding to totally "cure" the "buzz"...but it might (or might not) help.

How is that for useless feedback?

Make sure that the shielding tape was designed to have continuity (through the adhesive backing) when you overlap it.

That makes up for my useless feedback above...LOL

Good luck with it!
 

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I would check your grounds first to see that they are all solid. At the pots and the bridge.
 

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I’d check to make sure you have proper grounds and proper solder connections at those grounds.

I’ve never had a issue with noise and never had a guitar with all that shielding, seems like a lot of unnecessary work.

Also check the actual socket you’re plugging your amp into. I had crazy humming/buzzing when not touched my strings(everything plugged it). Grabbed all my gear and went upstairs, plugged into a different socket, noise was gone.
 

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If the problem persists you may want to try some noiseless pickups. I have tried almost all of them, and for a Tele I highly recommend Kinman Broadcasters and Dimarzio Area Ts.
 

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I hate single coil buzz when playing at low volume at home. The EHX HumDebugger is pretty good at killing it, but you may notice a change in tone. For me the best solution was hum cancelling pickups from MJS in Mississauga. They can make them for whatever you pickup style you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the useful suggestions, everyone; much appreciated.
I really love the sound of the Dawgtown pickups in this axe so switching pups is not an attractive solution for me (respectfully). Based on your collective input, I think I will take some time over the weekend to thoroughly check the grounding connectivity between pups, pots, the bridge plate, etc. Then I can make an informed choice about any additional shielding that might help 'beat the buzz'. I will post my findings in due course.

Thanks again!
 

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Ground the electronics to the bridge, then when you touch the strings a lot of the hum will go away. Also check to see if the jack grabs the cable properly.
 

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Sheilding cavities worked for me but if you're in a room with a dimmer switch its really hard to get rid of that.

Also, tighten the output jack nut too, and the jack nut on the amp or pedals. These often get loose and then you lose ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi again folks, well I ordered some copper foil (gotta love Amazon Prime 2-day shopping!...), lined the picker and control cavities and then double checked all the ground connections. Lo and behold, the excessive buzz is gone and the guitar is much quieter now. Again, thanks to everyone who chimed in with your helpful suggestions; much obliged!
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Oops, that should’ve said ‘lined the pickup cavities’.... damned auto-correct! o_O
 

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How does a loose nut on the output jack of a guitar result in the loss of ground?
You're right! I'm thinking of my amp doing that, causing crackling and weird noises.
The loose jack nut on my guitar did cause it to cut out not from losing ground but shorting out. Bad wiring on my part, I added shrink tubing.
 

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Bad wiring on my part, I added shrink tubing.
This is nice way to wire a jack with vintage shielded wire. FYI


It is a good idea to check the positive/"hot" contact on the jack to see that it is making good contact and that the plug is "snapping" into position when it is plugged in. Cheap jacks are the worst for this and I would always suggest switching to a Switchcraft jack if this becomes an ongoing issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I can concur with greco's advice, as I've also had shaky (crackling & buzzing) connectivity with output jacks that was remedied by 'switching to a Switchcraft'...
 
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I recently encountered a simpler method though that works just as well.
Just shield the pups. I did this with my Jazz bass pups and it works without affecting the tone,
Mod Garage: How to Shield Single-Coil Pickups | Premier Guitar
Dirk Wacker's advice is sound, though I have to confess I don't understand the first thing about "eddy currents". However, if he says that leaving a small gap in the shielding tape rduceds any undesirable tonal changes, I'll take him at his word.

What I will suggest, however, is using teflon plumber's tape to cover the coil first. It is cheap, very thin, conforms to the coil very nicely, and has absolutely no adhesives that can decompose over time. The copper shielding tape's adhesive will stick to it, but if you have to remove all that stuff, should the coil itself ever pose problems, you'll be able to take everything off without any damage to the coil. Admittedly, the right kind of black cloth tape looks cooler, but I'll trade undamaged for looks-cooler any day of the week.

I will also put in a plug for the magic of dummy coils.
 
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