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I need a cheap way of getting a spring reverb to run in series
with my stereo. I found the 80's style stereo at the dump
and it drives a 12" speaker just fine for 60's vintage guitar.
I miss that 60's reverb sound that the solid state reverbs
cant replicate.
Thanks, Wendell in PEI
 

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"It's always something..."

west6008 said:
I need a cheap way of getting a spring reverb to run in series
with my stereo. I found the 80's style stereo at the dump
and it drives a 12" speaker just fine for 60's vintage guitar.
I miss that 60's reverb sound that the solid state reverbs
cant replicate.
Thanks, Wendell in PEI
Well, for stereo you'd need TWO spring reverbs!http://guitarscanada.com/Board/images/smilies/tongue.gif
:tongue:

There's no cheap and easy way to do this unless you already have a lot of electronics experience, Wendell. First of all, the spring reverb unit is just part of the circuit. You need to build a driver circuit to feed signal into the springs and then a recovery circuit to build up all the gain you lost in the springs.

What kind of circuit? What are the specs of your spring reverb tank? There's LOTS of different ones! Once we know we can decide on what the circuits would look like. Then you're gonna have to get a soldering iron out and build 'em.

I think you're hoping it's just a matter of plugging various units you've scrounged up in a certain order. Unfortunately there's a lot more to it than that. It's like saying "I found a piston and a wheel! Now how do I put them together to make a snazzy car?" Speaker outputs are usually way too much power to feed a reverb tank and the output likely wouldn't match a stereo preamp input.

We haven't even talked about how we need a mixer circuit. You don't just drive the signal through some springs. It sounds best when you can mix the spring output with the original "dry" signal.

If you want to learn how to build amps and reverb circuits you might want to google up the ax84.com site. This is a site for beginners as well as experienced guys, focused mainly on building low power amps that sound like classic tube Marshalls.

You just know that's GOTTA be fun!
 
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