The Canadian Guitar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,261 Posts
Lol, the bench even has little booties on it's footsies (this thing makes me sick; appologies to grammas everywhere).
 

·
Premium Member
Air guitar
Joined
·
3,250 Posts
Someone has way too much spare time :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,947 Posts
Lol, the bench even has little booties on it's footsies (this thing makes me sick; appologies to grammas everywhere).
Those booties are the most useful things in that whole package (I assume they are for preventing floor scratches) but they are fugly that's for sure .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,468 Posts
no word of a lie, my mother put milk bags on the feet of her piano and bench...it prevented her cat from using them as a scratching post.
altho I'm sure in this pic its done for the floors.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,163 Posts
I suspect that's actually a piano not an amp...I also suspect someone is either 1) far too close with their grandmother 2) works at a coffin company.
My wife watches enough of these victorian and baroque-era costume dramas that I might have thought there was actually a person under there, rather than any sort of object.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,261 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,163 Posts
There's easier /less garrish ways to protect the floor - they're called furniture felts (also good for kick drum beaters - the modern ones that are just a round plastic disk). No need for those ridiculous booties.
Yeah, but it's a set, man. If you had a white Strat with a white pickguard and white pickups, you wouldn't stick black control knobs on it, would you?

Forty years ago, when I was working at McMaster on stuff that would eventually give a guy in England the Nobel for medicine, I had to comb Hamilton for the older heavy glass leg protectors that resembled small ashtrays. We needed something to put the bran mash food reward in for the brain-damaged rats, that was heavy and stable enough that they couldn't knock over in their franticness. Plastic just wouldn't do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
Forty years ago, when I was working at McMaster on stuff that would eventually give a guy in England the Nobel for medicine,
Dude.... that is a whole other thread!!! You can't just give us that wee tidbit as anecdotal and be done!!

Some guy won the Nobel and you did some of his research?!?!?!?!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
25,163 Posts
Nah, I didn't do it. Or I should say, it wasn't my idea. The prof I worked for was doing it, and regularly communicating with John O'Keefe, who shared the 2014 prize ( The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Spatial Model for Cognitive Neuroscience ). If you look at the dedications at the front of O'Keefe and Nadel's 1978 book The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map ( https://www.cognitivemap.net/HCMpdf/HCMComplete.pdf ), it is dedicated to two historic giants of psychology - Ed Tolman and Don Hebb - and to the prof my wife and I were working for, the late Abe Black, who passed away in 1978. A bunch of Abe's papers are cited in the book. The co-author, Lynn Nadel used to come by our lab now and then. All these McGill guys stick together.

We were essentially replicating some of Tolman's studies from the 40's, but with rats that had their hippocampus severely damaged. We were examining their remaining ability to "navigate" using distant cues, and relying on them alone. That meant that they couldn't sniff their way to the correct choice. So, to be able to confirm that, I had to have heavy glass food receptacles at the end of each maze alleyway, both baited with bran mash, but one covered with nylon mesh that prevented access to the food, and the other with a hole in the mesh that allowed for access. I also had to construct an elevated maze on a pedestal with removeable arms that could be switched around like 3-card monty. The intent was to assure that the rats couldn't leave a trail of some bodily fluid that would help them make the choice. The maze was in a circular room-within-a-room that was on ball-bearings, like a lazy susan. The floor, heavy curtains, ceiling, and maze could all be rotated every single trial, such that the rat couldn't rely on any consistency in sounds or light or subtle breezes, either. They were obliged to look up and treat the things I was suspending from the ceiling like they were reading the stars. I had to do the surgery to produce the selective brain damage. I still have the surgical tool I used and all the stained brain slices in a box. Heck, I'm looking at it right now.

It was tough slogging. When you have fairly amnesic animals, you have to train them EVERY day so they don't forget over the weekend. I had a number of 40-day shifts, but it was worth it. It was VERY neat to learn about O'Keefe's award in 2014, and feel a sense of connection to it. I kinda miss the smell of science.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top