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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Do you ever start to learn a song only to get to the solo part and just realize that it is too difficult for current skill set or do you persevere? I am talking your moderately difficult solos like some of Anguses. It also depends on what your current skill set is. For me some of his solos are extremely difficult because I don't have super fast fingers like his. He plays some mind blowing solos. I know we can expand our knowledge and skills by trying beyond our comfort zone. Just go for a bite at a time and not the whole elephant. I literally have to slow my thinking process down so I don't overthink things.

I have to admit that I started the solo to Hotel California and I wasn't "grace under pressure". I cracked like a boiled egg. I thought I would be gung ho like I was with Stairway to H. I just found myself realizing how much was involved in just even listening to it was crazy! All the little subtle techniques involved! Whew!

A project for another day. Constant challenge is good but sometimes you have to kickback and just play the stuff you know and just love to play. Just that positive vibe from playing the shit that gets you rocking and you sound good because you just know you do. Playing right in the pocket smiling ear to ear because you're just having one of the best times of your life!
That builds your confidence right to where it should and then you give a stab at the new solo because you just may get right this time. And if you do, that is a holy shit moment if ever there was one!
 

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I typically break difficult parts down and slow them down to train the fingers on the movement. Boring, but it works. However, sometimes I just don't have the patience, so I just rock out with what I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I typically break difficult parts down and slow them down to train the fingers on the movement. Boring, but it works. However, sometimes I just don't have the patience, so I just rock out with what I know.
Yup, me too sometimes! I will just Play the blues and the minor pentatonic scale. It works well together and it 's an easy combination of notes in any key that I can finally put together and it sounds cool!
 

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I've never really been one for copying a solo note for note--
Getting the general character of it?--sure.
But I'd rather do my own thing--even if it isn't as good as the original.
But that said--learning existing solos is one way to learn how to do your own--or at least a part of it.
For me it was the first 4 notes of Albert King's intro solo to Crosscut Saw that made it click for me--and I'm sure I wasn't playing it that well--but it made something click.
 

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there is a world of difference playing a signature lick in a song and playing a solo.
One you need to learn as closes as you can and the other is meant to be played as you feel.
Most solos are NOT signature parts of that song so don't treat them as such.
G.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I usually go right for the solo first. Once I get that down, I'll learn the rest of the song. Once that's done I learn to take the signature licks from the solo and build my own interpretation of it.
That's awesome! To be quite honest with you, it makes a lot of sense to do that way! Just never thought if it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
there is a world of difference playing a signature lick in a song and playing a solo.
One you need to learn as closes as you can and the other is meant to be played as you feel.
Most solos are NOT signature parts of that song so don't treat them as such.
G.
Quite frankly I like to play things the way they were musically written. I will improvise if I have to because I am not as familiar with the solo as I should be but if it's a solo like Stairway to H then I like to play it in the correct manner!
 

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Do it all the time. If the solo is too complicated or long I don't work on the song. Just don't want to waist all that time on something. I used to do Back in Black but never really had it down right and it was easily forgotten. His solo's do not stick to your basic minor pentatonic. I don't really even find them that great to start with. I would like to do some Vince Gill but the solo's are too involved. Generally I just make up my own on the fly. Sometimes they work and sometimes they are a disaster. I think I would rather have a root cannel than pick through a difficult solo tab.
 

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Do it all the time. If the solo is too complicated or long I don't work on the song. Just don't want to waist all that time on something. I used to do Back in Black but never really had it down right and it was easily forgotten. His solo's do not stick to your basic minor pentatonic. I don't really even find them that great to start with. I would like to do some Vince Gill but the solo's are too involved. Generally I just make up my own on the fly. Sometimes they work and sometimes they are a disaster. I think I would rather have a root cannel than pick through a difficult solo tab.
If you can hybrid pick you get pretty close to Vince Gill's solos. Start with One More Last Chance and Liza Jane. I can't quite perfectly nail his phrasing, but I'm probably 90 percent there on those two.
 

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Learning a solo note for note allows you to do explore things that you may not normally do. It is a good exercise and it is work - Some of my favorite guitarists transcribe solos note for note on a regular basis to maintain their discipline and expand their musical abilities.

I use mostly software to slow down licks and when i get lazy, i go to Youtube. Sometimes Tab but you don't necessarily get the feel of the solo.

I once tried to learn a solo by Elliott Easton by slowing down the tempo and repeating the lick over and over. I did it so many times that i made myself nauseous!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Do it all the time. If the solo is too complicated or long I don't work on the song. Just don't want to waist all that time on something. I used to do Back in Black but never really had it down right and it was easily forgotten. His solo's do not stick to your basic minor pentatonic. I don't really even find them that great to start with. I would like to do some Vince Gill but the solo's are too involved. Generally I just make up my own on the fly. Sometimes they work and sometimes they are a disaster. I think I would rather have a root cannel than pick through a difficult solo tab.
But see that's the beauty of everything. You like Vince Gill and I don't and I love AC/DC and you don't. Each to his own. I have a passion for everything I play. I have an obsessive focus on the songs that shake my soul. AC/DC play many songs that shake my money maker. They're not for everyone. Back in Black was easily forgotten because you didn't have any passion for that particular song. Oh well, hole dug in the ground! haha

If you want to get better though you absolutely have to push yourself beyond your comfort zone. If you don't you stagnate. That's not what I want personally. I am growing better everyday and that's because I am always pushing my own personal boundaries. I owe it to myself to be the best guitar player I can be and nothing will stop me or get in my way. I am going for the kill. A lot of people are not fortunate enough to have the drive and determination that I possess. You are personally responsible for your own growth no matter what it is!
 

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Sure beats the days when we had to pick up the needle
and place it back a 1/8th inch on our records, eh!? lol.
It sure does. The technology is incredible. 10 years ago, i had a little Tascam unit that would reduce the speed of the CD and maintain pitch and I thought that was incredible. Now, you can EQ the song as well and many more options (and no need for a CD).
 

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I differentiate between songs I'm learning and songs that come up in a jam, of course.

When I'm learning a song, I like to learn the solos correctly. Once I know it, I can deviate as I want, but I feel like I have to know the solo first, if for no other reason than out of respect for the song/writer. But if someone plays a song I haven't learned the solo to at a jam, I at least want to try and start with the basic idea that they do and then improvise from there. Sometimes I just can't remember or find it, then I just go for it. It's a jam so no one's really judging, but if you can get close to any of the signature parts of it, the other guys may look over and give you a nod of approval. That feels good.

My first CD player, a nice Sony Esprit, had a repeat setting that would repeat from Mark A to Mark B inside a song (hitting the button once and then again) and that was a huge boon to learning solos - considering I came from the 8-track days. Now I sometimes use Amazing Slowdowner to hear parts better or clear up muddy live bits. I don't think I've ever learned a solo off tab, but I have used tab to prove chord progressions are correct, if there's any doubt.


You are personally responsible for your own growth no matter what it is!
Nah, I'm blaming Sleeman's and Hostess. I had nothing to do with it, it's all their fault!
 
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I have forgotten the amount of solos I have skipped learning... Im not a good role model in that regard.
 
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