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When you are executing these solo's are you "seeing" major/minor triads on the fretboard or simply notes that you know are the 1, 3 and 5? Hope its not a stupid question. Your execution is enviable. I'm hearing some Gilmour in there....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When you are executing these solo's are you "seeing" major/minor triads on the fretboard or simply notes that you know are the 1, 3 and 5? Hope its not a stupid question. Your execution is enviable. I'm hearing some Gilmour in there....
Well both, actually. Triads shapes are great to know but you need to know where 1-3-5 are for each chord in as many ways as possible. It's great practice to play triads on one string in order to get used to finding them fast.


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Discussion Starter #7
Glad you dig it. Also, remember that every single one of these chords come from one key and scale - C Major Scale. I don't recall if I mentioned that in the video.


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Well both, actually. Triads shapes are great to know but you need to know where 1-3-5 are for each chord in as many ways as possible. It's great practice to play triads on one string in order to get used to finding them fast.


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That's a great piece of advice. I think I've just figured out my practice schedule for this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Distortion, I'm just following the chords. The concept is quite simple. The hardest part is coming up with interesting lines.

The chord progression:

C G Dm F
Am G Em F
 

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Can you use notes from the sus chords as passing tones only to resolve on the 1, 3 or 5th note of the chord? If you did that you can string the melody line out as long as you want to because your not resolving on any of the notes in the triad?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Any notes are fine as long as you resolve back to a chord tone. Now it's about phrasing too. Rhythm, shape of phrase, how many notes, etc. Chord tones and phrasing go together. A long string of 1/16 notes that happen to end on a chord tone will likely sound awful.


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Any notes are fine as long as you resolve back to a chord tone. Now it's about phrasing too. Rhythm, shape of phrase, how many notes, etc. Chord tones and phrasing go together. A long string of 1/16 notes that happen to end on a chord tone will likely sound awful.


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Thx for your reply! This is a very unique approach. I need to start doing my homework on all the notes that are involved on the chords.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It's actually not unique... you maybe didn't realize this is an approach a lot of experienced players use. Still Got The Blues is a good example of a melody that follows those chord tones in a very melodic way.
 

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Yeah this is definitely not unique. I'm working an exercise now that breaks down as follows:
- goal is to land on the third note of a chord on the downbeat (the 1)
- lead in will be an eight note from 5th of chord, followed by the 4th scale note (on the 4 and the and before the downbeat)

This will eventually be expanded to land on the chord 3rd on the 1 and the 5th of the chord of the 3 of a measure.

So lets take a I-IV-V progression in a 12 bar blues in A. The three chords are A, D and E. So for the bars with an A chord will be played with a target of C# (third note of chord) precedsd by a E and a D. The D chord will be played with a target of F# preceded by an A and G#. And lastly the E chord will be played with a target of G# preceded by an B and an A.
What about the ROOT you ask? Well, that's the bass player's job. :)

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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah this is definitely not unique. I'm working an exercise now that breaks down as follows:
- goal is to land on the third note of a chord on the downbeat (the 1)
- lead in will be an eight note from 5th of chord, followed by the 4th scale note (on the 4 and the and before the downbeat)

This will eventually be expanded to land on the chord 3rd on the 1 and the 5th of the chord of the 3 of a measure.

So lets take a I-IV-V progression in a 12 bar blues in A. The three chords are A, D and E. So for the bars with an A chord will be played with a target of C# (third note of chord) precedsd by a E and a D. The D chord will be played with a target of F# preceded by an A and G#. And lastly the E chord will be played with a target of G# preceded by an B and an A.
What about the ROOT you ask? Well, that's the bass player's job. :)

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Sounds like a good exercise. I'm ROOTing for ya! haha!
 

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I put a lot of likes in this thread. This is yet another practice technique that I have to spend way more time on. I'll have to incorporate more of this in my practice schedule. Thanks particularly on the mention earlier of Rhythm and Phrasing Robert. A player can hit all the chord tones they want, but if they don't make sense rhythmically and in a phrase, it can sound like gibberish. Told my buddy's son just last night that he's at the point in his playing where he's just now starting to piece the words that he speaks on guitar (via the 2 pentatonic positions he knows) into better phrases (sentences). This stuff is like learning a bunch of new words and sentences for the first time. put Don't together it proper will it sound like almost in gibberish end. :rolleyes:
 
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