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Hi everyone
The middle wire on the bridge pickup volume pot has come loose on my ibanez sz520 , so I have ot solder it back . Is there anything I should know ? Do I need these little clip things to dissipate the heat ? Will any sodering pencil do the job?

I did a bit of soldering before , but I don't want to ruin my guitar.:wave:
 

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Hi everyone
The middle wire on the bridge pickup volume pot has come loose on my ibanez sz520 , so I have ot solder it back . Is there anything I should know ? Do I need these little clip things to dissipate the heat ? Will any sodering pencil do the job?

I did a bit of soldering before , but I don't want to ruin my guitar.:wave:
Any soldering iron should be fine, Coustfan! Canadian Tire will have something.

Don't bother with clips. Just touch the iron to the middle solder lug for a second or two and then feed the solder on to it until it melts and flows over the connection. Then immediately take the iron away, holding things still until the solder hardens. As long as you don't keep heating things for minutes at a time you should be fine.

Just remember, always use electrical solder! It has rosen inside the solder wire to act as a flux to help the solder tin/lead stick better.

Often newbies make the mistake of using plumbing solder, which is easier to find. It contains an acid flux, useful when soldering copper pipe. Unfortunately, when used on an electrical connection it will stay there and slowly start to eat away at the connection, causing future problems.

Have fun, and "pas le Mauditz bier!"

:food-smiley-004:
 

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another common mistake is melting the solder with the iron. As Wild Bill mentioned, heat the contact point, then feed the solder onto it.
 

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Just a thought...when you get a soldering iron, you might want to get one with a small chisel or pencil style tip
(or one that allows you to choose/replace tips). Working in a small, confined space can be frustrating with an iron with a large tip..... IMHO.

Good Luck with the repair.

Dave
 

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KEEP YOUR SOLDERING TIP C L E A N! Use a that funny looking sponge (wet it) and rub the tip on it. Always make sure that the tip has a fine layer of solder on it (tinned), if the solder tip metal is exposed to the air, the solder will not "flow" on to the surfaces you want to solder. There are some great soldering pointers (videos etc.)on solder.org.
 

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KEEP YOUR SOLDERING TIP C L E A N! Use a that funny looking sponge (wet it) and rub the tip on it. Always make sure that the tip has a fine layer of solder on it (tinned), if the solder tip metal is exposed to the air, the solder will not "flow" on to the surfaces you want to solder. There are some great soldering pointers (videos etc.)on solder.org.

Yes, absolutely. The tip must be clean and shiny with no more than a fraction of a millimeter of solder on it. You won't be able to do a good and clean job with a soldering tip that's caked with oxidized solder. Once you figure the importance of keeping the tip clean, you've got half of the work done.

Instead of a sponge, I use damp tissue paper (enough rolled up to make a quarter inch pad).
 
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