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Discussion Starter #1
I saw at musicstop they had a Line6 Guitar box that allows recording and all sorts of amps and effects. The software has a tool to remove the humbucker noise. I don't want to pay another $150. Is there a software package out there cheaper that will allow me to mix MP3 backing tracks or CDs remove guitar tracks and such. I already have a Gdec and can record via line in and play the mp3 in WMP 11 and record what you hear on my audigy. I guess I need something that will remove the humbucker noise.

Thanks for any help,

Jeff
 

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Just out of curiosity, humbuckers are supposed to be quiet, so what is this "humbucker noise" that you are getting?
 

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Hum can be introduced from many sources. Have you tried recording with your monitor off. Is your guitar cable pooched? is your amp near any other sources of electrical output? Is the cable from your G-Dec ok aswell? Make sure all connections are firm and in place you may also be experienceing partial connections which also cause hum.

I live near some radio towers and on some days the interfearence is so bad I can't record. I usually have to find the "magical sweet spot" with my guitar cable by moving around the room until the interfearance is reduced.
 

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Ya make sur eyou don't face the monitor while recording too. Seems obvious, but I didn't figure that out right away hah.

Does the box not come with Gearbox software? It's supposed to. I just bought one used and it did. As far as I know you can download the Gearbox software from the Line 6 website anyway. If you need to make an account, you can just use the serial on the Toneport. They have all kinds of software downloads at the site.

The noise reduction gates in the software aren't the greatest anyway. Using gates like that comprimises the tone a little. I just try to find a way to reduce buzz like not playing near the monitor, and keeping the lights/tv/appliances off.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi, thanks for the replies, yes I play with monitor on and yes it is in a small room right wireless router and other electronic devices. I suspected it might be interfereance.

Also, I am using an Epiphone SG400 which has a defect in the trebel switch which causes me to get alot of static or lose sound alltogether. That might be causing it or a bum humbucker. I am using a simple patch chord $27 right angle from Musicstop. The humming noise is gone when I play clean and returns when I use dirty.

Is there any recording software out there I can use? Right now I am using a 1/4 to 1/8 patch chord from phones on G-dec to line in on computer. I use Windows sound recorder to record (60s time limit) and WMP to play the backing track.

Thanks
Jeff :rockon2:
 

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HFXRock said:
Hi, thanks for the replies, yes I play with monitor on and yes it is in a small room right wireless router and other electronic devices. I suspected it might be interfereance.

Also, I am using an Epiphone SG400 which has a defect in the trebel switch which causes me to get alot of static or lose sound alltogether. That might be causing it or a bum humbucker. I am using a simple patch chord $27 right angle from Musicstop. The humming noise is gone when I play clean and returns when I use dirty.

Is there any recording software out there I can use? Right now I am using a 1/4 to 1/8 patch chord from phones on G-dec to line in on computer. I use Windows sound recorder to record (60s time limit) and WMP to play the backing track.

Thanks
Jeff :rockon2:
Software to remove hum usually just makes a mess of your recordings, it has to analyze and then remove it based on your threshold values. Usually it still leaves some hum in certain places and removes actual parts of recordings that it shouldn't.

If you have Nero, it includes a wave editor that has some noise removal stuff, along with some other other sound processors.

That said, I too concur to fix the signal originally to remove the hum.

Recording Software:
Take a look at Cubase LE it's a professional piece of software that's been scaled back for beginners.
Another option is look at some recording H/W they often include software like Cubase LE, Traction or others.
 

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Mr. David Severson said:
I live near some radio towers and on some days the interfearence is so bad I can't record. I usually have to find the "magical sweet spot" with my guitar cable by moving around the room until the interfearance is reduced.

This is probably old to you but have you tried AC line filters? I've always found that RFI rides in on the power cord. A filter cured the problem with one guy who lived only half a mile from some radio towers. It was a country station and he was the farthest thing from a country fan so he was incredibly grateful!

Except for his Willie Nelson albums, of course. EVERYBODY loves Willie!:food-smiley-004:

In a studio I found that a lot of little filters can work better than one big one feeding an entire rack but of course the one big one is easier and should be tried as a first step.

With those amps that use the "computer cord" type of female chassis connector you can use filters made up as a power connector with an AC filter buiilt right in! They come in 1,3, 5 and greater amp ratings and fit in the exact same mounting spot. They are a little deeper at the back but there's usually room.

They only cost a buck or two in production quantities so it's a shame more amp makers don't put them in at the factory. They work GREAT! The only amp I ever saw one in was a "Zoot Horn 500" bass amp from at least 25 years ago. This was a tribute amp to Zoot Horn Rollo - Zappa's bass player.

Just FYI, in case you didn't already know.
 

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Use an LCD monitor and fix your guitar. Make sure your guitar is grounded, you shouldn't need software to get rid of hum, if you do you have some other problem and your money is best spent resolving the root issue.

Wireless routers work in the GHz range, unless you are using a wireless transmitter for your guitar, it's not causing your issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just got the guitar replaced. You know its a miracle.. The noise is gone.

Have have an LCD screen, but there is hum when the tv is on, when its off though noise goes away thanks for the tip.

Thanks for all the help.

Jeff
 

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I'll tell you what works for me flawlessly, and I'm pretty picky about my guitar tone getting altered in any way so if it didn't work I wouldn't use it. I do most of my multitrack recording with Adobe Audition (used to be Syntrillium Cool Edit Pro) and it has a noise reduction filter that works by taking a sample of purely just your noise floor and then uses that information to filter itself out of the entire guitar track if that's what you apply it to. If you do the process properly you won't get artifacts. The trick is let your recording roll a bit at the beginning without starting to play anything so you have just the pure noise that the filter can take a profile of later on. Using this, I don't even worry anymore about hum my pickups pickup from one of my monitors which is a CRT, and sometimes even record in the summer with a fan running in my room. If you don't sample the noise properly or long enough you can end up with flangy sort of artifacts but if done right you won't and it doesn't alter my tone. And the reason I do it this way instead of gating is becasue a gate won't work if say you hit that last power chord in a song that just rings and naturally fades... as the chord trails off you will start to hear the noise or the gate will cut in too early and you lose your nice end trail. Anyway, I think most DAWs these days have a similar filter. I can even do a quick recording and post an audio clip example if anyone wants.

Also, as mentioned, about 90% of hum caused by a guitar's pickups picking it up from A CRT monitor can be resolved by turning yourself (and your guitar) perpendicular to the screen.
 
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