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Good job. The first 2-3 weeks is the hardest. Get through that and it’s mostly smooth sailing except for the odd 3 minute craving. It feels MUCH better being a non smoker. Not a puff for me for a little over four years now.
 

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That does bring up an interesting question - when can I consider myself a non-smoker?
Every single day, apparently. ;) Mark Twain is reputed to have said: "Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I’ve done it thousands of times."

In the AA world, it seems people consider themselves to be lifelong alcoholics, but in remission of sorts. The same thing does not seem to apply to smokers, but having neither a propensity towards alcohol or nicotine (luck o' the draw, not any sort matter of principle), I don't know whether this is a qualitative difference between each type of dependency, some sort of belief within AA, or what. But you do ask an interesting question. I'll be curious to see what others post on the matter.
 

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Every single day, apparently. ;) Mark Twain is reputed to have said: "Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I’ve done it thousands of times."

In the AA world, it seems people consider themselves to be lifelong alcoholics, but in remission of sorts. The same thing does not seem to apply to smokers, but having neither a propensity towards alcohol or nicotine (luck o' the draw, not any sort matter of principle), I don't know whether this is a qualitative difference between each type of dependency, some sort of belief within AA, or what. But you do ask an interesting question. I'll be curious to see what others post on the matter.

AA has some cultish aspects so their adoption of the mindset of 'forever in remission' might not actually be supported by science. Other programs for dealing with alcohol addiction don't always agree with AA on that element, or for that matter on most aspects of how to treat alcohol dependency so even with that specific substance there's disagreements on whether or not the idea of 'remission for life' is true.

That said, not many people casually smoke cigarettes in the way people casually drink alcohol so alcohol might have a more slippery slope to be worried about. The occassional celebratory cigar or visit to the sheisha shop might be more like what occasional drinkers do, so only if those were really common would people need to worry about that turning back into addiction.

I'd imagine the nature of the substance in question matters too. Some substances are really psychologically addictive but don't have significant physical aspects, others have a substantial physical aspect as well. Alcohol can be pretty terrible for physical dependency as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
AA has some cultish aspects so their adoption of the mindset of 'forever in remission' might not actually be supported by science. Other programs for dealing with alcohol addiction don't always agree with AA on that element, or for that matter on most aspects of how to treat alcohol dependency so even with that specific substance there's disagreements on whether or not the idea of 'remission for life' is true.

That said, not many people casually smoke cigarettes in the way people casually drink alcohol so alcohol might have a more slippery slope to be worried about. The occassional celebratory cigar or visit to the sheisha shop might be more like what occasional drinkers do, so only if those were really common would people need to worry about that turning back into addiction.

I'd imagine the nature of the substance in question matters too. Some substances are really psychologically addictive but don't have significant physical aspects, others have a substantial physical aspect as well. Alcohol can be pretty terrible for physical dependency as well.

Smoking has a huge psychological aspect.

Since quitting, I constantly find myself thinking that when I finish X I will have a smoke, or when I do Y I will have a smoke. And they aren't big things, they are simple activities but my habit was to smoke afterwards. Even something as simple as going upstairs to grab a drink will make me think of smoking when I come back downstairs (I smoked in the garage, not in the house, so would pass the door to the garage while going up/down).

Previously, the idea would gnaw at me until I smoked again. This time (luckily), I can immediately dismiss the idea and that is it.

Driving is the worst though as I always smoked while driving.
 

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I have often said that people should receive in pleasure what they forfeit in health and longevity. The difficulty with smoking is that, for so many smokers, there isn't all that much pleasure involved, so they sadly give up more than they get; a pretty lousy deal if you ask me. They stand with the cigarette pinched between index and middle finger, the smoke rising as the stance is adopted, and the inhale is largely procedural and often unconscious. My response is smoke the ones you're going to truly enjoy, and leave the rest in the package. But the habitual nature, and manner in which it is woven into daily activities, makes that a difficult path to pursue.

The conditioned tolerance model of dependencies, that applies classical conditioning principles to the analysis of such dependencies, predicts that the more pairings a substance has with external events/stimuli within some period of time, the stronger the association, and the more those external events can elicit the compensatory responses that in turn provoke substance-seeking.

Bodies generally work towards homeostasis. Substances with punctate physical effects (i.e., perceivable onset/offset) produce compensatory physical responses over repeated presentations, to counteract the direct physical effects of the substance in question and achieve that balance/homeostasis. When the ingestion ritual and cues associated with that substance occur, the compensatory response kicks in, which is perceived as a need for the substance and its effects.

Think of it like living with someone who turns the thermostat down whenever they see you coming up the driveway or walking up to the door. Eventually, your reflexive response when you come home will be to go immediately to the thermostat and turn it up to a "liveable" temperature, because coming home predicts "too cold".

The habit/act of cigarette smoking has the unfortunate characteristic of associating nicotine-ingestion with so many events, actions, and contexts that the individual attempting to quit is constantly assaulted by things that elicit that compensatory response, increasing the urge to smoke in order to "restore balance". I would expect people to find it easier to give up cigar smoking. A big part of the hurdles cigarette smokers face when trying to quit is the "convenience" of cigarettes and how many come in a package.
 

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as colchar said, it was a smoke with everything, hammering nails with a cigarette in my mouth, sometimes getting in my eye..I do not miss that.
I would get in the car, start it, then push in the old car lighter ,tapping the steering wheel , fiddle with the tunes, waiting on that coil to get hot. lol
stay with it .. you got a whole forum rooting for you
 

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Driving is the worst though as I always smoked while driving.
Driving is a tough one, for sure.

I stopped by chance 5 years ago. I had a bad cold/flu and I just couldn't smoke through it. I knew I had to stop soon anyhow... smoking at 50+ for a man is a bad idea. So, cold turkey coffee and smokes on the same day. It was tough but not debilitatingly so, and my wife still smokes! There are times when I still crave it... I often smoke in my dreams, and there are certain moments that come together, like the perfect storm, it's the time of the year, the time of day, the smell of something, the song in my head and it's like, if someone handed me a smoke at that moment I would take a huge haul off it.

You just have to fight your way through it. It does get easier, but the temptation can pop up way down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I still haven't smoked.

And I hadn't had a drink since quitting smoking as I figured it would increase cravings and be too much of a temptation. I just finished cutting the grass. As always, I had a beer while doing so and - nothing. No increased cravings, no reaction at all. I might as well have been drinking Pepsi.
 

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I still haven't smoked.

And I hadn't had a drink since quitting smoking as I figured it would increase cravings and be too much of a temptation. I just finished cutting the grass. As always, I had a beer while doing so and - nothing. No increased cravings, no reaction at all. I might as well have been drinking Pepsi.
The problem is more, you're out at the bar, on your 3rd or 4th beer, and half the table keeps getting up and down to go out for a smoke. For me, it was maddening, and I eventually bummed a smoke or as many as I could before I got told to go buy my own, which I inevitably did.

I think I'm past that now, but then, haven't been in the trigger sitch due to, you know.
 

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I still haven't smoked.

And I hadn't had a drink since quitting smoking as I figured it would increase cravings and be too much of a temptation. I just finished cutting the grass. As always, I had a beer while doing so and - nothing. No increased cravings, no reaction at all. I might as well have been drinking Pepsi.
I like where this is going. I'm always rooting for people working to make positive changes in their life and health. Keep it up.
 

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I had to stay out the bars for about 6 months when I quit. Back then everybody smoked right in the bars so it a tough place to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
The problem is more, you're out at the bar, on your 3rd or 4th beer, and half the table keeps getting up and down to go out for a smoke. For me, it was maddening, and I eventually bummed a smoke or as many as I could before I got told to go buy my own, which I inevitably did.

I think I'm past that now, but then, haven't been in the trigger sitch due to, you know.
I don't really go to bars any more and haven't had more than two drinks at a sitting in ages so I think I'll be safe. By the time either of those things happen again I'll have had quit for long enough that I'll be OK. At least I think I will.
 

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The problem is more, you're out at the bar, on your 3rd or 4th beer, and half the table keeps getting up and down to go out for a smoke. For me, it was maddening, and I eventually bummed a smoke or as many as I could before I got told to go buy my own, which I inevitably did.
That's what it was like for me except back then you could smoke in bars. So I'd go out drinking and end up having to buy a pack although by the time I was 22 or 23 I'd stopped permanently and I was never really addicted anyway just did it because it was there and could stop any time.

My wife smoked a lot and couldn't quit until it was too late and she had bad COPD starting up which eventually killed her about 8 years ago. Tragic to watch it and know how it's going to end; I told her when we were young that she'd end up dragging an O2 tank but sometimes there's just nothing you can do. I once said to her "I should have chained you to a wall for 3 or 4 weeks 30 years ago to get you off that shit;" she said "you're right."
 

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That's why I said, and say, that "people should receive in pleasure what they forfeit in health and longevity". Motorcycles are dangerous. Hell, driving anything is dangerous. But we accept the risk because it makes us feel alive. Okay, fair trade. Many of the foods we love are not the best thing for us, but damn they taste SOOOO good. What makes smoking such a lousy, and patently unfair, deal is that people end up forfeiting a LOT more in health and longevity than they get in pleasure. And I hate seeing people get screwed over.
 
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