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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
. . . to be a non-smoker eh?

After 35 years (give or take a year) of smoking basically a pack a day, I quit a few days ago. I'd wanted to for a while, but hadn't planned to that day. I just realized as evening approached that I hadn't smoked at all that day so decided not to. And I haven't since.

Best part about it is that I feel fine. Some minor cravings, but otherwise fine.
 

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. . . to be a non-smoker eh?

After 35 years (give or take a year) of smoking basically a pack a day, I quit a few days ago. I'd wanted to for a while, but hadn't planned to that day. I just realized as evening approached that I hadn't smoked at all that day so decided not to. And I haven't since.

Best part about it is that I feel fine. Some minor cravings, but otherwise fine.
it's not the nicotine addiction that makes quitting tough. it's the habit/routine.
 

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At least you have guitar playing to occupy your hands. That is also something that ex smokers deal with. I quit cold turky 33.5 years ago. Granted, I just started cycling so it wasn't all the complimentary. You'll start breathing easier, climb stairs easier, have extra money......a LOT......and you'll smell better. Both physically and literally. Think olfactory. There is no downside to quitting.
 

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Excellent! Just remember that you can never have another cigarette. If you do and start up again, you've lost. If you do and don't start up again, you will be fooled into thinking you can smoke again anytime and you'll be fine, which is not true.
Wherein the expression "quittin's easy, I've done it a thousand times" comes into play. I found cold turkey really does work better than cutting back. Cutting back leads to smoking more. But yes, giving in to a craving will be the last thing to do. I can't comment on the outcome of quitting cigarettes but you also smoke weed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Imagine the gear you can buy with your smoke money. If only I could do the same with wine.

I ain't gonna lie, that was one of the first things I thought of. A pack a day at $12 per pack is $360 a month or $4320 a year. The reptilian part of my brain immediately started thinking about gear I could buy. Thankfully I don't need anything.
 

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My friend quit and then hogged back so many artificially-sweetened candies that he had a seizure in my driveway -- thank goodness he hadn't driven away. Not seizure, SEIZURE! It took me and my neighbour to restrain him. I drove him around for months while he waited to get his license back.

That seizure event was the perfect opportunity to invite his best friend back to town: yep, Mr. Tobacco. He & Mr. Tobacco have been fine ever since.

If you feel like candies, go with real sugar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Funnily enough, I haven't been reaching for sweets or anything else any more than I normally would.

That being said, I am having a cup of tea right now and hadn't had tea for 3-4 years even though I used to drink it regularly.
 

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Good for you! You might not need more gear, but $5k year certainly can buy stuff, or a vacation.
I remember my parents quiting and taping a quarter to the calendar each day they didn't smoke. I think it represented a half pack each or so. 1972, no idea what smokes cost the but they were cheap because they weren't taxed heavily yet.
My dad was a slim man till then but quickly gained 30 pounds in a few years and struggled to get it off again. It's not a given that happens to everyone, but eating more seemed to be a thing back then when people quit. All my aunts and uncles smoked, but most quit eventually and gained weight.
 

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I don't know if this is true, but I've heard smoking stimulates the digestive system. If it is true, that would explain weight gain for many people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Good for you! You might not need more gear, but $5k year certainly can buy stuff, or a vacation.

I need to head over to the UK. I was hoping for late August, but doubt things will have settled down enough by then so late October is more likely. The money I won't be spending on smokes can pay for that, and maybe a return trip in December.
 

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Very very hard. But you can do it. I quit after 20 yrs of at least a pack a day. Hang in there. Your brain will lie to you, saying, “just one is ok. After all you’ve been clean for ten days.” Don’t listen to it! A few extra pounds won’t kill you like smoking will.
 

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Excellent! Just remember that you can never have another cigarette. If you do and start up again, you've lost. If you do and don't start up again, you will be fooled into thinking you can smoke again anytime and you'll be fine, which is not true.
i started smoking at 12. i'm 56. it killed my parents. i've quit a few times. the first time, i quit for 2 years. when i started back again, it wasn't due to cravings, it was boredom. for a few years after that, i could pick it up and put it down at will.
the next time i quit, it was for 10 years. a combination of things, stress being the biggest one, caused me to start smoking again, about 4 years ago. i have a real hard time with it now, i'm still doing it.
anyhow, the point i wanted to make regarding the above quote is this:

the first time i quit, it was HARD. but i quit because it disgusted me. i used to keep an "emergency cigarette" in a little test tube with a rubber stopper on top of a piece of machinery in my shop. one day that was particularly stressful, i grabbed that test tube, pulled the stopper, and went to another guy to ask for a light. a guy standing next to him said
"you could light that, but if you do, every shitty moment you went through trying not to smoke is all for nothing."
i broke that cigarette and went back to work.
 

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Wherein the expression "quittin's easy, I've done it a thousand times" comes into play. I found cold turkey really does work better than cutting back. Cutting back leads to smoking more. But yes, giving in to a craving will be the last thing to do. I can't comment on the outcome of quitting cigarettes but you also smoke weed.
I agree. Took me about 10 years to quit. Cold turkey is the way, and the secret is - there is no such thing as having 1 cigarette. Ever. 1 will always lead to more.
 

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I started smoking when I was 11. Didn't stop until I was 45 so 34 years of smoking. I used to finish a pack of 25 on an evening out in the bars. I was considered a heavy smoker. I'm done with it now. Its been 21 years now since I stopped. I still occasionally have cigars. When we went to Cuba a few years ago, I was smoking the cigarillos all through out that trip. Got home here and didn't smoke. Doesn't bother me anymore.

Well congratulations! You've just added a few years into your life.
 

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Good luck and keep it up! It gets easier every day. Physical addiction goes after a few weeks and can be easily handled with nicorette. Psychological addiction took me about a year - basically go through everything you go through in a year without a butt and you'll be fine, no more cravings after that. After 10 years, physically, it's like you never smoked at all. The hardest things is breaking the routine of the habit, especially for musicians - hanging around with smokers, having a butt at a jam or a gig. Maybe COVID is a good time for quitting, everyone's social routine is changed.
 
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