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Discussion Starter #6
Will a vet need to heavily sedate the dog to remove those?

Beautiful looking dog.
If he goes to the vet they probably will sedate,he's big enough for them to take precautions but I doubt it will come to that.
I've got a few out already ,but he's sick of me in his face for now.
He's actually my neighbour's dog who has adopted me.
Bill will probably pull a few tonight.
Must have been a small porcupine ,the quills are pretty small,and no there are none in his mouth.
 

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I legitimately thought the dog had a bird in its mouth. I'm not sure which is worse.
 

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He got off very lucky. Your dog was Smart enough to get the out of there after the first sniff. I've seen so many worse cases. My son's husky tried to kill a porcupine, and he just about died from it. Unbelievable mess.

My one black lab I had years ago ran right over top of a porcupine in some tall grass. He didn't have any quills in his mouth, but his chest, stomach, inside of this legs, and his privates were covered with them. He couldn't walk so we sat out in the field where it happened for over an hour and he let me pull out quills till he could walk home. He won't let me pull the ones out of his wiener & sack though......had to go to the vet for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
He got off very lucky. Your dog was Smart enough to get the out of there after the first sniff. I've seen so many worse cases. My son's husky tried to kill a porcupine, and he just about died from it. Unbelievable mess.

My one black lab I had years ago ran right over top of a porcupine in some tall grass. He didn't have any quills in his mouth, but his chest, stomach, inside of this legs, and his privates were covered with them. He couldn't walk so we sat out in the field where it happened for over an hour and he let me pull out quills till he could walk home. He won't let me pull the ones out of his wiener & sack though......had to go to the vet for that.
Our old lab let me pull all the quills out of her on a couple of different occasions.
She'd let me pull a few,then pull away and run around the yard for a bit,then come back to get a few more pulled out.
The rotti in this guy must over rule the lab in him when it comes to "quill in the face removal" policy.
 
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If you cut the tips off the quills it makes removal easier because they don't have air in them expanding the quill when pinched with pliers. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
If you cut the tips off the quills it makes removal easier because they don't have air in them expanding the quill when pinched with pliers. YMMV.
yeah,I've done that in the past but these quills are really short and the dog really doesn't like me near them.
If I cut them off they will be even harder to grab on the next attempt.
Of the quills remaining,the longest ones only have about an inch to try and grab as it is.
 
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yeah,I've done that in the past but these quills are really short and the dog really doesn't like me near them.
If I cut them off they will be even harder to grab on the next attempt.
Of the quills remaining,the longest ones only have about an inch to try and grab as it is.
You just have to nip the very tips off. Probably the best thing though is knock the dog out at the vets. There may be small ones inside the mouth that you may not see. At least that was my experience.
 

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Could you please educate me as to how you remove the quills.

You cut them to allow the quill to 'collapse' and then grip them with pliers to somehow manipulate them to be removed...correct?
I'm assuming they have a 'barb' ...how do you cope with the effect of the barb hooking on the tissue?

Thanks

How is the dog doing so far?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Could you please educate me as to how you remove the quills.

You cut them to allow the quill to 'collapse' and then grip them with pliers to somehow manipulate them to be removed...correct?
I'm assuming they have a 'barb' ...how do you cope with the effect of the barb hooking on the tissue?

Thanks

How is the dog doing so far?
Chico is quite fine,they don't seem to be bothering him in the least,there's just a few in his chin.
He's eating and drinking fine.
There are two schools of thought on removal,some advocate cutting the quills,while some claim that makes them more prone to splintering and harder to grab later.
Most vets recommend an office visit and sedation,I've done three removals myself(on two different dogs ) and they all worked out well.
Mind you those dogs were very co-operative,they wanted them out,knew I was helping ,and let me do it so it was easy.
This guy is a little more leery,which is a shame because there are relatively few and it could be over in a couple of minutes.
From some of his actions I'm sure he has a historyof abuse from humans,so I can't really fault him for shying away when something hurts him.
tomoorow I'll go and see Bill and we'll decide how to proceed,maybe the two of use can keep him calm enough to finish.
About the barbs,it not so much one barb at the end but little barbs all in the same direction along the quill.
The quill only wants to travel in one direction and that is inwards,that's what makes them dangerous if they are in the chest or mouth for example.

actually I hear the dog outside right now back-talking some coyotes across the road.....situation normal
 
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Could you please educate me as to how you remove the quills.

You cut them to allow the quill to 'collapse' and then grip them with pliers to somehow manipulate them to be removed...correct?
I'm assuming they have a 'barb' ...how do you cope with the effect of the barb hooking on the tissue?

Thanks

How is the dog doing so far?
Grab quill with pliers. Yank quickly. Watch for dog biting. Even dogs that are not prone to bite might getcha if you are removing quills.
 

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My childhood, Socks, got got a face-full of them; probably 10 times more that this dog. He patiently let me pull them all out. He only let it happen once. He was a pretty smart dog. A real smart dog would've known to leave the porcupine alone in the first place.
 
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Thanks for the update and for all the information.
New update,we couldn't get all of the remaining quills out yesterday,not for lack of trying though.
75lbs of dog wasn't having it.It's amazing how strong he is.
He went to the vet today,they put him out and fixed him up...they did find a couple in under his tongue so it's good he went.
I was just over,he's home now and still pretty groggy.

A real smart dog would've known to leave the porcupine alone in the first place.
Can't blame him for being a dog .
Dogs learn through experience or training,they don't know what a porcupine is until they come across one.
Now he knows what one is.

Vet says he'll either never be back for porcupine issues or he will become a repeat offender.
Apparently some dogs hold a grudge and attack every one they see after an incident .
 
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