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I haven't been called in years. I always politely said no, I'm not in a financial position. I guess they gave up. Education institutions are chronically underfunded anyway. All universities ask alumni for donations and have done so for years and will continue to do so.
 

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I graduated from 3 universities. Only the last one contacted me for donations. Being as that one charged me more in continuing registration fees (which included athletic fees for the use of a gym that was several thousand miles away) while I was off on the other side of the country for 4 years than I paid for the first two degrees, I figured I had done my fair share.

That said, tuition covers only a modest fraction of the cost of university, so they have to get their money from somewhere. And the somewhere includes both wealthy and not so wealthy benefactors, in addition to whatever the university makes from investing research grants, and government funding. It takes a lot of money to operate a university.

A longtime friend of mine was president of a big Canadian university, and while students may have thought he was in on every decision affecting their lives, the overwhelming brunt of his job was actually schmoozing governments, industry, and rich folks for money. Sadly, when rich people make a hefty donation, they get to say what it gets used for. It doesn't just get put into general revenues. The university president's role is to put a bug in their ear and gently nudge them in the direction of directing their money to things the school really needs. Sometimes they listen, and sometimes not. During my time at U. Vic., the former Lieutenant Governor of BC donated a couple of hundred thousand to the school to build a fountain in front of the library. They would fill the fountain with water for promo pics once a year, and then drain it for the remainder. Nice fountain and nice pics, but I could think of many better uses for the money.

Let's hope that some or all of us are eventually in a financial position to express our gratitude for what we gained while we were in school.
 

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It can be a pain, but support governments who support education and hopefully the problem goes away a bit. Most people have no idea who cash strapped universities actually are
 

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when I graduated, almost immediately I got frequent letters asking for alumni donations.
I laughed as I was struggling to find work, had to default on OSAP etc...the idea was ludicrous.

TBH. I was bitter for years at university as I felt it did little for me in finding practical work, and my first job paid barely $20k/yr, my friends who went to college for much less time and less expense to be mechanics had been earning $50-60k and buying boats and stuff. it isn't the answer for everyone, and employers don't exactly "ooooh" and "aaahh" at a candidate with a bachelors degree anymore.
I had some great experiences in university, but I wouldn't say I connected as much with it as I did with high school.
 

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It can be a pain, but support governments who support education and hopefully the problem goes away a bit. Most people have no idea who cash strapped universities actually are
nor do they remember how much of a our fees are subsidized by the government.
Think your tuition bill is too high? Check out the government's - Macleans.ca

maybe that's why college sports (and the revenue they bring in) are so important to our neighbors down south. watching American tv /movies feels weird....no one cared about or went to football games at U of T.....or my high school either, TBH. same with frats/sororities....such a different, blander experience up here.
 

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nor do they remember how much of a our fees are subsidized by the government.
Think your tuition bill is too high? Check out the government's - Macleans.ca

maybe that's why college sports (and the revenue they bring in) are so important to our neighbors down south. watching American tv /movies feels weird....no one cared about or went to football games at U of T.....or my high school either, TBH. same with frats/sororities....such a different, blander experience up here.
Not bland at all. We put education first and don't look at ourselves as pro sport development leagues. Tying educational operationing budgets to sports is dangerous and ends up with complete absurdities (coaches making millions, sports budgets which far exceed educational budgets). Looking at Universities as "businesses" gets it all wrong. A University is not a business "selling" a product or service, although administrators and politicians unfortunately keep trying to squeeze it into that model.
 

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Not bland at all. We put education first and don't look at ourselves as pro sport development leagues. Tying educational operationing budgets to sports is dangerous and ends up with complete absurdities (coaches making millions, sports budgets which far exceed educational budgets). Looking at Universities as "businesses" gets it all wrong. A University is not a business "selling" a product or service, although administrators and politicians unfortunately keep trying to squeeze it into that model.
oh I agree...theres a lot of problems with the US "professional" unpaid sports program...but I still say it was a bland experience here compared to all the fun they seem to have at American schools. and for that reason I think theres more post graduate loyalty there than here. Noone talks about where they went after they graduate here...Noone says "ahhh.....a York University man!" the way they would say if you went to Cornell or Yale etc. Its just a different experience.
and maybe I noticed it more having gone to a school with especially low spirit (U of T) and was in a program (science) that was largely made up of geeks and immigrants anyways, who tended not to care about much more than studying. as such I have absolutely zero attachment to the place I went to for 5 years.
 

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By contrast, however, it is the American way despite the fact that American Colleges can be anywhere from 5-10x (or more in some cases) Canadian tuition. Despite the much higher tuition, it is expected and is the accepted culture there to donate, especially at the corporate level, and Americans tend to identify themselves with their respective colleges for life, as Diablo pointed out.

Sport is a whole different animal in the US and is hard to compare apples to apples. Besides being more monetized, organized sport development model is largely through the school system in the US, right from elementary school to NCAA. Here, school sports are extra-curricular "activities" as I am learning as the General Manager of my son's Uni Lacrosse Team, and athletic development models are mostly by self-organized, self-funded clubs that are under Provincial Sports Organizations and National Sports Organizations. While the same sport governing bodies exist, they work with the education system for development.
 

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They were asking for a donation.......

ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME?

They charge that much for tuition, then have the balls to call and ask for a donation?

They've lost my respect.

Tuition doesn't come anywhere close to covering the costs of education, and government funding doesn't cover the rest of their financial needs, so it makes sense that they will call seeking donations.
 

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I graduated from 3 universities. Only the last one contacted me for donations. Being as that one charged me more in continuing registration fees (which included athletic fees for the use of a gym that was several thousand miles away) while I was off on the other side of the country for 4 years than I paid for the first two degrees, I figured I had done my fair share.

Bollocks. The extra fees paid by grad students are nowhere near the cost of tuition, never mind being more than the cost of entire degrees as you ridiculously claim. Just stop and think about what you are claiming here - that ancillary fees as a grad student added up to more than the cost of an entire four year undergrad degree. I get that you are trying to make a point but do you not grasp that you are diminishing that point by making ridiculous claims and that there are other people here who went to university, for both undergrad and grad school, who have paid those fees themselves and will thus know full well that you are full of crap?

And if you were half as smart as you pretend to be you would have realized back then that universities allow grad students who are not on campus to submit a form which reduces the ancillary fees that they pay. They understand that if you are not there, you are not using certain services and thus do not make you pay the fees for those services. When I was living in London I filled out those forms and didn't have to pay those fees. Maybe if you were half as smart as you pretend to be you would have figured that out too and would have saved yourself some money.


Sadly, when rich people make a hefty donation, they get to say what it gets used for.
So do small donors. My parents donated the entire time that my brother and I were in university and they always directed their donations to specific purposes (usually the library).
 

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I would bet my university can rival the type of life long affiliation some US students hold, but I know what you are getting at. Our schools are generally much smaller and don't have the sports programs to rally around as a source of identity. I would also wager a bet that, given the much higher fees, American students are "invested" in their school's identify in a way Canadian students are not. It is a different culture, but having spent my entire adult life on campuses across the country we really are not that bland; we just aren't married to something akin to Hockey Night in Canada.

The US system runs as the wider country runs: those in the upper socio-economic classes spend their money as they see fit. While some freely donate, the level of US student debt is freaking shocking. Student debt is also increasing at an astronomical rate in the USA due to cut backs in government spending. I don't want to go down that road and don't want Canadian schools to become increasingly dependent upon the whims and desires of the affluent.

So yes, the donations calls are annoying (I get them too) but I think the bigger issue is funding schools in the first place.
 

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when I graduated, almost immediately I got frequent letters asking for alumni donations.
I laughed as I was struggling to find work, had to default on OSAP etc...the idea was ludicrous.

While in grad school my roommate and I didn't give our undergrad institution our address, we left them with out parent's addresses. Eventually they started calling and writing to us looking for money and we were pissed (jokingly pissed) that our parents had ratted us out and had given them our contact info.



maybe that's why college sports (and the revenue they bring in) are so important to our neighbors down south. watching American tv /movies feels weird....no one cared about or went to football games at U of T.....or my high school either, TBH. same with frats/sororities....such a different, blander experience up here.

It depends on where you went to school. At places like Western, Laurier, etc. football is big (clearly not on the same level as in the US, but big for Canada).
 

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nor do they remember how much of a our fees are subsidized by the government.
Think your tuition bill is too high? Check out the government's - Macleans.ca

maybe that's why college sports (and the revenue they bring in) are so important to our neighbors down south. watching American tv /movies feels weird....no one cared about or went to football games at U of T.....or my high school either, TBH. same with frats/sororities....such a different, blander experience up here.
The contemporary emphasis on access to higher education, as well-intentioned as it is, has a lot of things that come along with it that we tend not to think about:
  • More students means more staff. Not just profs, but support staff as well. More profs means more lab/research/office space.
  • More students means more classrooms and more buildings. Not just classrooms but residences.
  • More students means more facilities. Bigger computing center, networks, video projection systems, and technical staff to maintain them.
In short, the cost of providing access to higher education and operating the schools seems to mushroom much faster than the cost to students. And tuition is an ever-decreasing fraction of the cost of attending post-secondary education. When I was an undergrad at McGill, my tuition was roughly 35-40% of the total annual cost of living away from home and going to school. A modest summer job and an $800 school loan pretty much covered things. Today, unless one is in one of the professional programs (medicine, law, health services, management, etc.), where tuition is high and enrollment limited, tuition likely amounts to about 25% or less of the total cost of living away from home and attending school.

Diablo, you might find this infographic of interest: EduData – Where do university graduates work in Ontario? – It'sNotAcademic The connection between what people study, and where they end up is not always as they imagine it to be. What's interesting to see is how the connection between area of study and career path changes with age cohort. The connection between what people study and their eventual career has been changing.
 

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U of O, Fanshawe, Queens, UVic, Western, Conestoga all send their pleas to this household but none of us are really in the position to contribute in any meaningful way. Post secondary education is tragically underfunded, but the lowly among us can have little effect compared to corporations, association, federations, industry...of some we may be a part and may be able to influence.

A walk around Queens a few years ago seemed to reveal which departments were getting extra money. Never mind programming and resources, the brick and mortar could tell a tale.
 

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Tuition doesn't come anywhere close to covering the costs of education, and government funding doesn't cover the rest of their financial needs, so it makes sense that they will call seeking donations.
and whether you agree with University sport or not, for the most part, student-athletes pay their own way to play for their school, which is not going to lead to professional sports.
 

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Bollocks. The extra fees paid by grad students are nowhere near the cost of tuition, never mind being more than the cost of entire degrees as you ridiculously claim. Just stop and think about what you are claiming here - that ancillary fees as a grad student added up to more than the cost of an entire four year undergrad degree. I get that you are trying to make a point but do you not grasp that you are diminishing that point by making ridiculous claims and that there are other people here who went to university, for both undergrad and grad school, who have paid those fees themselves and will thus know full well that you are full of crap?

And if you were half as smart as you pretend to be you would have realized back then that universities allow grad students who are not on campus to submit a form which reduces the ancillary fees that they pay. They understand that if you are not there, you are not using certain services and thus do not make you pay the fees for those services. When I was living in London I filled out those forms and didn't have to pay those fees. Maybe if you were half as smart as you pretend to be you would have figured that out too and would have saved yourself some money..
$800/yr for a 3-year undergrad degree at McGill (Quebec students do 3 instead of 4 years as in Ontario)

UVIC charged around $2500/yr in continuing registration, including athletic fees, grad student association fees, etc. There was no option for opting out of any of the fees, and no excuses accepted, regardless of how far away one was. If you wanted the degree, you paid up like you were on campus. Perhaps regulations have changed in the quarter-century since. I forget the tuition rates for the in-between degree at U of A, because a lot of it was covered by assorted grants and assistantships, but it was less than UVic charged.

I thought I might be able to escape your harassment by staying out of the political pundit section Apparently I was wrong.
 
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